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Who’s Really Behind The Super Secret Solar Tariffs Petition?

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The US solar industry is in an uproar over a group of petitions before the Department of Commerce, which seek to impose heavy new tariffs on imported solar panels and solar cells. The writers of the petitions have chosen to remain anonymous and now the guessing game is on. So, who is behind those solar tariff petitions?

What’s The Big Deal About Solar Panel Tariffs?

If you’re new to the topic of solar panel tariffs, all you need to know is one thing: the number of actual soup-to-nuts solar manufacturers in the US is vanishingly small. Almost all of the domestic manufacturing in the US is done with imported panels and cells, among other parts. That means tariffs can make or break key players and put a damper on the entire domestic industry.

It’s not quite that simple, because other elements can come into play. The Trump administration put a crimp in the industry when it imposed new solar tariffs in January 2018, but technology improvements, new solar financing instruments, and the use of solar panels not covered by the tariffs helped keep the industry up and running.

Supply chain security is another complicating factor. As with the Obama administration, the Biden administration is trying to ramp up domestic supplies of key parts and materials. That’s going to take time. As things stand now, the US is going to have to continue relying on imports to accelerate solar installation in accord with the President’s ambitious climate action plan.

So, Who’s Really Behind The New Solar Panel Tariffs?

Into this picture steps a group of anonymous companies petitioning the Department of Commerce to impose new tariffs of 50% to 250% on imports of crystalline silicon photovoltaic panels and cells from Malaysia, Vietnam, and Thailand, according to an angry letter fired off by the Solar Industries Association of America earlier this week. The letter was signed by 190 or so US solar stakeholders.

In the letter, SEIA demanded to know who was behind the petitions. If you know how to look up petitions at the Department of Commerce, have at it. We searched under “crystalline silicon photovoltaic” and came up with four recent and not-so-anonymous requests for relief.

The first occurred in 2017 during the Trump administration and was filed on behalf of Suniva. The next one popped up in 2019, on behalf of “United States Trade Representative.”

Then it was radio silence until last month, when two petitions popped up. One was filed on behalf of Suniva and Auxin Solar, and the other was filed on behalf of Hanwha Q Cells USA, LG Electronics USA, and Mission Solar Energy.

If you’re having an a-ha moment, you might have to guess again. Auxin, Suniva, Hanwha, and LG were not among the 190 solar companies that signed on to the SEIA letter, but Mission Solar does appear on the list.

So, either Mission is playing both sides against the middle, or it has one hand that doesn’t know what the other is doing, or there are two different companies called Mission Solar. Or something else is going on.

Either way, neither of the August petitions are the ones upon which SEIA is aiming its wrath. According to news reports last month, several petitions were that were filed in August have yet to be published by the Commerce Department.

Who Really Supports Solar Panel Tariffs?

One might look for a hint among the solar companies that publicly supported the Trump administration on solar panel tariffs. One was Suniva, which later filed for bankruptcy. In 2019 our friends over at Quartz reported that Suniva later-later successfully reorganized through the New York firm Lion Point Capital.

Quartz also noted that the German company SolarWorld Industries’ wholly owned subsidiary SolarWorld Americas supported the Trump tariffs before it, too, filed for bankruptcy. Its assets were purchased by SunPower in 2018.

SolarWorld Americas did surface again in 2020, when the D.C. law firm Wiley represented it in a tariff case against the Chinese company Sunpreme in California (more on that in a sec).

What Is The American Solar Manufacturers Against Chinese Circumvention?

As for the identities of the anonymous petitions, the answer still lies somewhere deep within the halls of Wiley, which is also representing those filers. In a press release dated August 16, Wiley cites the organization American Solar Manufacturers Against Chinese Circumvention as the entity behind the anonymous petitions.

By circumvention, they allege that Chinese companies have off-shored much of their solar business to Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam, while continuing to hold a firm grip on subsidized manufacturing and R&D at home. The Wiley press release names many names including affiliates of Jinko Solar in Malaysia, Canadian Solar Manufacturing in Thailand, and Trina Solar in Vietnam.

Wiley’s August press release was widely reported, but nobody seems to have found a website or any other background information about an organization named the American Solar Manufacturers Against Chinese Circumvention, other than there are reportedly several solar companies in the group.

That thing about anonymity brings up another case of interest involving Wiley and privacy. Last March, the firm issued a press release that describes two amicus briefs it filed in support of organizations challenging a California law that requires all charities operating within the state to disclose their major donors to the California Attorney General.

One was filed in support of the Thomas More Law Center and the Americans for Prosperity Foundation. The other was filed jointly with the American Legislative Exchange Council.

If ALEC rings a bell, it should. Among other issues, the organization has been linked to obstruction on climate action, leading climate activists and other stakeholders to try and shed light on its donors.

Wily’s amicus brief with ALEC goes beyond First Amendment issues to describe why anonymity is so important to charitable organizations like ALEC.

“…ALEC’s brief highlights an organized campaign to defame, harass, and boycott ALEC members as well as members of other organizations over several decades using compulsory disclosure as a tool,” Wiley explains in its press release.

“The brief details how public officials allied with private activists tried to obtain rosters of ALEC’s ‘members and private contributors’ for the purpose of using that information ‘to ruin ALEC and eliminate its ideas from the public square,’” Wiley adds.

Do tell! Let’s go back to those anonymous circumvention petitions that Wiley filed in August. PV Magazine’s reporting included an interview with Wiley partner Timothy Brightbill, who explained the reasoning behind the anonymity:

“[Brightbill] declined to name members of the antidumping organization, saying that ‘Given the Chinese control of the entire solar supply chain, retaliation is likely if their identities are revealed.’ In such situations, the companies who make up the coalition ‘are allowed under U.S. law to remain confidential,’ he said.”

That seems to settle that. Wiley and Brightbill also represented SolarWorld Americas in that 2020 legal action, so it seems that anonymity cuts a fine cloth in matters such as these.

The Commerce Department has until September 30 to answer the anonymous petitions, so stay tuned for more on that.

Follow me on Twitter @TinaMCasey.

Photo: Solar panels via US Department of Energy.

 

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/09/24/whos-really-behind-the-super-secret-solar-tariffs-petition/

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Never Mind the Torque Talk, Feel the Romance 

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As relayed by Majella Waterworth to David Waterworth 

Conversations collected at the AEVA EV experience day in Cleveland, Queensland, 26th September 2021.


Two young men were enamored by our Tesla Model 3. Majella showed them the tech and then got the comment: “I couldn’t afford this and an expensive engagement ring for my fiancé.” Apparently, he was expected to pay 3 months’ salary — about  $10,000 — for the ring.  My wife, who is quite the expert on jewelry, suggested he look at estate jewelry. But he said if he bought something second hand he would be divorced before he got married.

Then there would be the expense of the date on which he would present the ring. So, she showed him Romance Mode, Netflix access, the quality of the music, and how the panoramic glass roof would be the piece de résistance of a very affordable romantic date. The lower boot in the back would be just right for the chilled champagne and beer, and the frunk would hold the pizzas. Now, that was a hit, and they all had a good laugh.


A young couple arrived and began asking the usual questions about range, charging, and price. They had a two-year-old and another on the way in less than 2 months. Majella suggested they check out the back seat, and when they saw the baby seats, they realized a Tesla could be a family car. They checked out the screens that shielded the glass roof and made the car more comfortable for the children. They were impressed by the space afforded by the frunk and the two boots – you need all the room you can get when you are out with two small children. Karaoke with the Disney tunes was a hit, as was the ability to use Spotify for more kids music.

They live in a unit block and were concerned about where they could plug in. Majella showed them the PlugShare app on her phone. Dad was really surprised at the amount of information available – type of plug, speed of charging, availability. He was impressed at how many charge points there were close to home. He loved the lightning bolt on the Tesla screen that showed where the Superchargers were and how to get to them. 

Photo by Zach Shahan/CleanTechnica.


Majella is a mother and grandmother. She has practiced her people skills over many years in retail. She is an amateur gemologist who enjoys faceting gemstones she has found herself.

 

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/10/17/never-mind-the-torque-talk-feel-the-romance/

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Bright Yellow Rivian R1T Spotted In NYC

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Sam Sheffer shared a short video of a beautiful, bright yellow Rivian R1T to TikTok yesterday. The electric truck was spotted in New York City and Sam noted in the video captions that he had a longer video on his YouTube channel — although, at the time of this article publishing, it is not yet up. In his TikTok video, Sam started with the front of the truck and showed that the frunk opened and closed automatically (sorry, Earl, no frunkpuppy submission here).

As with Tesla, Rivian has cameras everywhere. There are also very cool and unique roof-rack latches that easily snap on and off and can also be moved to the back of the truck above the bed area. The tires are 20 inch tires.

“Now, Rivian says this is an adventure vehicle, so in case of emergency, check this out,” Sam says while opening the door to the truck and then pressing a button along the inside of the door. “Inside the door is a built-in flashlight. How cool is that? And if the flashlight wasn’t enough for you, inside the center console thing is a portable Bluetooth speaker that charges in here!”

The truck also has an automatic liftgate that is activated by the push of a button and a gear tunnel where you can put anything from skateboards to groceries in. He also gave an inside look at the cab and showed the displays and the wooden dash. The seats are made with vegan leather, he added.

While demonstrating the charging port, which has a light to help its owner see at night, he asked, “Is this a transformer or is this a truck?”

You can watch Sam’s video on TikTok here.

 

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/10/17/bright-yellow-rivian-r1t-spotted-in-nyc/

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US & Denmark Unveil Big Plans For Wind Power

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Here’s the thing about renewables like wind and solar that many people don’t get. The “fuel” that makes them work is free. That is not to say the devices we construct to harvest energy from wind and solar don’t cost anything and don’t contribute some greenhouse gas emissions. But let’s not pretend that somehow all the concrete, steel, and piping that go into making a thermal generating plant are inexpensive and carbon free.

And yes, getting the power generated by renewables from where it is made to where it is used requires building new transmission lines. But they don’t leak oil and gas into our rivers and oceans the way pipelines do. Isn’t it odd how fossil fuel apologists question the need for new transmission infrastructure when it involves electricity from renewables but never do when it comes to electricity from thermal sources? One is a scourge while the other is a blessing? Does that make any sense?

The central point is, once the fuel for thermal generating plants gets consumed, we have to go out and find more of it. Prices for coal, oil, and gas aren’t stable. They fluctuate constantly — sometimes wildly — which makes it hard to make long term business decisions. The world is about to get a hard lesson in the true cost of relying on fossil fuels this winter. With unnatural gas in short supply, prices are expected to skyrocket. The cost of electricity in some places could double or triple as a result.

Yet the cost of sunlight never goes up. It is free and always will be. All we have to do is gather it up and distribute it efficiently and humans will have all the electrical energy they could possibly need forever.

Wind Is Solar

Wind is just solar energy in a different format. Think about it. Wind is air moving from one place to another. And what causes the air to move? Temperature differences. And what causes temperature differences? The sun. Whether we are talking about a breeze that fills the sails of a boat or the jet streams that encircle the globe, the sun is the ultimate source of all air movements on Earth.

Denmark Opts For Wind Islands

Denmark has been experimenting with offshore wind power since 1991. It’s no wonder two of the world’s largest wind turbine companies — Vestas and Ørsted — are both Danish. For years, it has thought about constructing artificial islands in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to serve as bases for offshore wind farms. Now the government has officially sanctioned the idea. The Danish government will own 50.1% of the islands with private partners owning the rest.

The island in the North Sea will have a capacity of 3 GW, which is equal to the electricity consumption of three million households and twice the amount of energy provided by all offshore wind turbines in Denmark today. It also corresponds to approximately half of Denmark’s total electricity consumption. The capacity will be expanded in phases to a maximum of 10 GW, which could cover the electricity consumption of 10 million households and contribute to the further electrification of Denmark and its neighboring countries.

In the Baltic Sea, the artificial island will be located offshore near the island of Bornholm. Electricity from the offshore installation will be distributed from Bornholm to electricity grids on Zealand and neighboring countries. The turbines off the coast of Bornholm will have a capacity of 2 GW, corresponding to the electricity consumption of two million households.

The decision to establish the two energy islands was reached under the climate agreement of 22 June 2020, which was entered into by the Danish Government, the Liberal Party, Danish People’s Party, Social Liberal Party, Socialist People’s Party, the Red-Green Alliance, Conservative Party, Liberal Alliance and the Alternative.

The US Offshore Wind Initiative

Offshore wind is popular because the equipment can be placed well out to sea where it is invisible to people on land. We don’t object to a welter of poles, wires, and transformers cluttering up our built environment but heaven forfend we have to deal with the sight of a spinning turbine. Eeeek! Also, wind speeds tend to be more stable and predictable out over the ocean than they are on land, which makes offshore wind more reliable.

This past week, the US government announced plans for seven major offshore wind farms along both coasts and in the Gulf of Mexico. They are part of a plan by the Biden administration to create 30 GW of offshore wind energy by 2030 — enough for 10 million homes. Sharp eyed readers will note Danish authorities expect that much electricity to power 30 million homes, which tells you something about how much electricity the average home in the US uses compared to homes in the rest of the world.

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said her department hopes to hold lease sales by 2025 for areas off the coasts of Maine, New York and the mid-Atlantic, as well as the Carolinas, California, Oregon and the Gulf of Mexico. The projects could avoid about 78 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions while creating up to 77,000 jobs, according to The Guardian.

In addition to offshore wind, the interior department is working with other federal agencies to increase renewable energy production on public lands, Haaland said, with a goal of at least 25 gigawatts of onshore renewable energy from wind and solar power by 2025.

The government’s wind initiatives will face a host of technical and political challenges. Who will ever forget a certain ex-president telling a group of fawning admirers that wind turbines “kill all the birds”? Yet the same people don’t bat an eye when offshore oil rigs (many of which are visible from land) spill millions of gallons of crude oil into the ocean, when pipelines threaten the water supply of millions of people, or fracking turns domestic drinking water toxic. Can you say “hypocrites,” boys and girls? Yeah, we knew you could.

The government is taking steps to address those concerns, however. The DOE announced last week it allocate $11.5 million to study the risks offshore wind development may pose to birds, bats, and marine mammals. It will also monitor changes in commercial fish and marine invertebrate populations at an offshore wind site on the east coast and spend $2 million on visual surveys and acoustic monitoring of marine mammals and seabirds at potential wind sites on the west coast.

“In order for Americans living in coastal areas to see the benefits of offshore wind, we must ensure that it’s done with care for the surrounding ecosystem by coexisting with fisheries and marine life – and that’s exactly what this investment will do,” Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm announced.

The Takeaway

The bottom line is what is known in the industry as the levelized cost of electricity — the triple net, absolute measure of what it costs to generate kilowatt of electricity. Water seeks its own level, nature abhors a vacuum, and business craves the lowest cost option. Today, the LCOE of wind and solar energy is lower than thermal generation and getting cheaper all the time. And why not? The cost of fuel for renewables is zero. It doesn’t get much cheaper than that!

Fossil fuel adherents will fuss and fume about national security, energy independence, and the wonders of military might, but the truth is renewables not only slash carbon emissions, they can enhance national security, provide energy independence, and eliminate much of the need for standing armies to any country and all for free. What could we possibly be waiting for?

 

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/10/17/us-denmark-unveil-big-plans-for-wind-power/

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Cool & Fun Alternatives Manufacturers Can Use To Lower Insurance Premiums For Fast EVs (Part 2)

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In Part 1, I explored the problem of high insurance rates for EVs, and the problems that can come with giving insurance companies even more data. Long story short, there are life-and-death level privacy risks that come from having your personal data out there, the data isn’t as good as we think, and insurers will eventually want even more of our data or money.

In this article, I want to explore the problem a little more so we can see why alternative approaches are necessary, and then go through some of the options I’ve come up with.

I May Be Wrong, But I’m Not Alone

I know not all readers will agree with what I’ve had to say in Part 1, and some will think I’m being extreme or paranoid. Keep in mind that I’m not saying that you personally shouldn’t be able to purchase such insurance or share your personal data with whoever you want. I think customer choice is a great thing, and you should be able to choose that option if you’re comfortable with it and think it suits you.

Even if us “luddites” who don’t want telematics-based insurance are 100% wrong and 200% stupid, around a third of insurance customers aren’t comfortable sharing telematics data, so addressing this concern with alternatives is still a smart move. Leaving a third of the market to a company’s competition isn’t a great move, and if a manufacturer’s insurance monitoring programs are really saving lives, having 1/3 of the population sit those out leaves a lot of chances to improve safety on the table.

Manufacturers and insurers should come up with alternative approaches that we can choose from depending on our comfort level. That way, people comfortable with the risks of telematics-based insurance can still use it, while people like me can have alternatives to choose from. Plus, you can do telematics plus alternatives, and save even more!

On top of this, public support for innovative insurance programs can be improved when people aren’t reading about how something like a “safety score” could lead to bad driving. People don’t like to feel like guinea pigs, especially when it’s for an experiment they didn’t sign up to be part of. Once again, even if these concerns are unfounded, they should still be considered if a manufacturer doesn’t want the government coming down on them.

Things Any Alternatives Must Do

High performance vehicles often come with high insurance premiums because the history of other owners with the same make and model isn’t so great. Big wrecks, a high number of small wrecks, or anything else that drives the average cost of claims for that make and model up leads to a high “symbol,” and high premiums for the owners of that vehicle type.

Telematics helps insurers offer lower rates because (in theory) they don’t have to guess at who is more likely to do something irresponsible with a vehicle that has 2–5 times the power of the average family sedan they had a good driving record in before.

For any alternative solution to work at reducing what you pay for insurance, it must (A) lower the actual number of wrecks and the costs of those wrecks for the make and model in the wild and/or (B) help insurers to see that you’re personally a less risky driver. Ideally, both should happen.

Idea #1: Tutorial Mode For New Owners

One of the biggest problems with fast cars is that it’s a lot easier to get in over your head. People who have been driving a gas car with only 100–300 horsepower don’t know how different a vehicle’s dynamics can be with 500+ horsepower and full, instant torque from zero RPM. Thus, even experienced drivers can make big, big mistakes.

If manufacturers offered an optional “Tutorial Mode” for new owners, insurers would likely approve a discount for drivers that went through the tutorial and gradual got used to the higher power levels a performance EV offers.

The car can start out offering only a small fraction of its full potential power for a set number of miles, while offering safety tips through the infotainment system. With a reasonably good driving score (with plenty of leeway for the occasional need to do things like stomp the brakes), the vehicle can unlock higher levels of power a little at a time until the driver finishes the tutorial and has full power at their disposal.

No data, other than that the driver passed the tutorial program, would need to be sent to insurers, so privacy concerns wouldn’t be an issue if one chose to use these “training wheels.”

Idea #2: In-Person Training For New Owners

The Jurassic Park-like entrance to the Bronco Off-Roadeo.

Earlier this year, I had a lot of fun going to Ford’s “Bronco Off-Roadeo” near Austin, Texas. The event is meant for new Bronco and Bronco Sport owners to get familiar with the off-road capabilities of their vehicles in a controlled environment with professional instructors. Perhaps more importantly, the training time is included in the price of the vehicle.

Not only was it a fun experience and a great show that Ford put on, but I left the event knowing a lot more about how the new Ford Bronco works, and where the vehicle’s features would work best. I didn’t leave there knowing everything, but anyone would be a safer off-roader after attending such an event.

The gathering area for the training drives.

There’s no reason that other manufacturers, including the manufacturers of high-performance EVs, couldn’t do the same. Insurance companies already give discounts for additional driver training, so this would be a great approach.

Idea #3: In-Car Virtual Reality Training

In-person training is expensive, especially if a customer has to travel to the event. Fortunately, modern technology gives us other options, and today’s EVs are well-suited to this kind of thing.

It may surprise some readers that the United States Air Force uses the DCS World flight simulator software to train A-10 Warthog pilots. The simulator runs on a normal gaming computer, using off-the-shelf VR goggles like the Oculus Quest. Add a decent set of controls (joystick, throttle, and a few other odds and ends–all available for cheap on Amazon), and you can provide a person with a simulation of flying that’s close enough to the real thing for the Air Force to allow it to serve as training time.

Here’s the thing: Tesla already uses the vehicle’s controls for in-car games. Beach Buggy Racing 2 Tesla Edition uses the car’s steering wheel and pedals to control the video game car on the car’s center display.

Tesla’s computing hardware is also up to the task of powering advanced VR software, especially the newer ones. So, that’s not going to get in the way. Add some power-steering-based wheel force feedback and modified sim racing software to the car, work any adjustable suspension to add realism, plug in a pair of VR goggles, and you can have a very robust and realistic car simulator software.

The gaming potential of using a Tesla as a sim racing rig is cool on its own, but it could also serve as a great virtual environment for safety training. While parked, the driver can experience all sorts of driving situations we would rather not ever see on the real streets, and learn to effectively deal with them to avoid collisions.

This could enable every Tesla to come with a months-long advanced driver training course that drivers could go through in their spare time to get insurance discounts. If other manufacturers’ in-car computers are sufficient to do this, any EV could potentially serve as a training area.

I’ve personally tried DCS World, and found the experience very realistic. I’ve also done Star Wars Squadrons in VR, and while I have no idea what flying a TIE fighter is really like, it did feel very realistic. But, none of my personal experience is anywhere close to what an Air Force flight instructor or a professional race car driver has. If today’s VR is good enough for them, it should be good enough for anybody.

Do You Have More Ideas?

I’m going to hand this back to the readers now. Do you have any ideas that EV manufacturers could use to improve safety? Do you have any other ideas to reduce insurance costs without introducing potential dealbreakers like monitoring or tracking?

I’d love to hear about them in the comments!

Featured image by United States Air Force (Public Domain)

 

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/10/17/cool-fun-alternatives-manufacturers-can-use-to-lower-insurance-premiums-for-fast-evs-part-2/

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