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Space and the new ESG business climate

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The E in ESG is getting another boost as the United States rejoins the climate change fight, and space promises to play a central role.

A rising number of companies have already added ESG scorecards to their annual reports, detailing the progress they are making toward environmental, social and corporate governance goals.

As the importance of ESG grows, the space industry will become an increasingly critical part of how every company operates.

The momentum has been accelerating after BlackRock, the world’s largest fund manager overseeing roughly $9 trillion of assets, said last year it would base all its decisions on ESG criteria.

“Climate risk is investment risk,” BlackRock chief executive officer Larry Fink wrote in his annual letter to other CEOs.

Planet SkySat captures the March 2021 Fagradalsfjall volcano eruption in Iceland in near-infrared to track the path of molten lava. Credit: Planet Labs Inc.

The concept got a major push when Allison Lee, acting chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), outlined plans March 15 to put ESG at the heart of the U.S. financial market regulator’s agenda.

Setting the stage for potentially forcing companies to monitor and disclose ESG targets, she said: “I am asking the staff to evaluate our disclosure rules with an eye toward facilitating the disclosure of consistent, comparable, and reliable information on climate change.”

It joins similar efforts in Europe and elsewhere as measures to tackle climate change get a significant boost from the U.S. rejoining the Paris Agreement, which aims to drive global action on the issue.

A lot of ESG data about the Earth can only be gained from the vantage point of satellites beyond it, putting space in the center of this international trend.

MARKET DEMAND

Space likely has the biggest role to play in the environmental side of ESG, one of its most visible components, and where satellite companies are already helping companies track and meet climate change targets.

“Nature will be on the balance sheet, which means space will be on the balance sheet because you can’t see ESG without us,” said Andrew Zolli, vice president of impact initiatives for U.S. satellite imagery operator Planet.

Many space companies, ranging from satellite operators to dedicated analytical businesses, have been growing in recent years as ESG trends expand their market to businesses that have not sought space capabilities before.

Ursa Space Systems’ Daniel Baruch. Credit: Ursa Space Systems

Underpinning much of the demand are the financial crises, corporate governance scandals and environmental declines over the last decade, according to Ursa Space Systems’ Daniel Baruch.

They have helped deteriorate shareholder value and trust in companies, said Baruch, director of global energy markets and business development at U.S.-based Ursa, a geospatial analytics company specializing in applications for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data.

“But you’re also seeing an influx in just the availability of data to provide this transparency,” he said.

“You’re seeing more sustainability information and different data sets that are coming out, exponentially in the last three years.”

More businesses realize they need to measure their carbon emissions and other impacts on climate, Cooper Elsworth, sustainability product manager at Californian geospatial analysis firm Descartes Labs, noted.

On the flip side, it is also becoming increasingly important for companies to assess the changing climate’s impact on their operations, including physical and production risks.

“Remote sensing provides a scalable, low-friction data source to begin to quantify these climate and decarbonization risks on businesses,” Elsworth said.

“The adage ‘if you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it’ is particularly relevant to climate action and ESG reporting right now — a compelling reason for the space sector to become involved in this burgeoning ESG landscape.”

Descartes Labs primarily focuses on using remotely sensed data to improve carbon accounting and carbon reduction measures for corporations.

It works with businesses with supply chains that have liability associated with tropical deforestation, for example, helping them monitor, attribute, and reduce their impact on the levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

TARGETING POLLUTERS

Canada-based GHGSat uses its satellites to monitor greenhouse gas emissions from industrial facilities around the world.

While space agencies including NASA and ESA have been monitoring these gases for years to inform global climate change models, GHGSat’s satellites focus on a more granular level to track facilities with much lower emission rates.

“What we’ve wanted to do from the get-go was to measure emissions from targeted individual facilities, and work with the operators with those facilities to understand, control and reduce their emissions,” CEO Stephane Germain said.

The company combines its measurements with third-party data, providing analysis to the emission generators themselves, regulators and market analysts.

At the top of the list of customers for GHGSat are those in the oil & gas market — the largest industrial source of emissions worldwide.

GHGSat also has customers across the next most prominent sources of emissions: power generation, coal mining, agriculture and waste management.

“We’ve done some exploratory discussions with several large … consumer-facing customers, and they have a clear interest in understanding the greenhouse gas intensity of their supply chains,” Germain added.

He underlined growing interest in understanding the climate impact of steel and aluminum production, and how suppliers differ when comparing tons of greenhouse gases per unit of material.

“That’s a very exciting area … it’s another way to put a value to the carbon intensity of a commodity that is being used by large consumer-facing companies, and we’re certainly active in that analysis,” Germain said.

Coal-fired mills make much of the world’s steel, especially in some developing countries, producing significantly higher emissions than a company using hydroelectric energy for their power.

GHGSat has three in-orbit nanosatellites and another eight it intends to launch by the end of 2022 to meet growing demand.

Paris-based Kayrros has developed a global methane monitoring platform that combines input from several satellites to continuously track methane emissions, measure them and attribute them to their source down to the facility level. Credit: Kayrros

ANOTHER GREEN PUSH

“The incorporation of ESG into operational demands is absolutely rising,” said Peter Platzer, CEO of U.S.-based space data and analytics provider Spire Global, which has launched more than 100 tiny satellites in the past decade to track airplanes, ships and weather.

“It’s rising because of changes in regulatory environments, changes in customer behavior and changes in policy,” Platzer said.

“And given that it is a global problem, or global demand, satellite data is going to be absolutely crucial for companies to answer those three-pronged [ESG] changes.”

One way a company can get a handle on ESG is by creating a “digital twin,” a virtual copy of its business that can simulate various changes.

Spire’s analysis and weather forecasting capabilities enable shipping companies, for instance, to plot more efficient routes to save fuel costs. It has the dual benefit of helping them meet increasingly stringent emission standards from the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations agency that sets standards for seafarers.

“If you extend that you will have a digital twin of Earth, which allows you to really understand how the various resources and environmental effects interplay with each other,” he said.

“And again, you cannot do an interplay on a global scale without truly global data — and that means satellites.”

REACHING SUSTAINABILITY

Increasing demand for sustainable products is also driving companies worldwide, including major consumer packaged goods businesses, to make significant changes with where and how they source materials.

Orbital Insight, another geospatial analytics firm based in California, last year announced a pilot project with Unilever, the consumer giant behind Dove, Ben & Jerry’s and many other household products that rely on palm oil.

The project aims to track Unilever’s palm oil supply chain to prevent deforestation.

“By tracing the relationships among farms, mills, refineries and ports, companies can see into the elusive ‘first mile’ of supply chains to identify potential issues,” Orbital Insight product manager Zac Yang said.

“This project is setting the precedent for other consumer packaged goods companies to get farm-level traceability and prevent deforestation through AI with location data, satellite imagery and computer vision. We believe that this will be the future of supply chain monitoring and offers a new level of sophistication for traceability.”

Yang said the company is also receiving interest to extend the technology to cacao, soy, paper and other commodities.

“Our customers are also using the technology outside agriculture, to understand industry and competitor supply chains, as the AI algorithms can be applied to any industry needing insight into where materials within their supply chain are sourced from,” he added.

High-resolution SkySat imagery of the Brunt Ice Shelf in March 2021. Credit: Planet Labs inc.

While the environmental part of ESG is a natural fit for space capabilities, Planet’s Zolli highlighted how it also provides important clues for the other two parts of the acronym.

“We can determine by watching the Earth various things — especially when combining Earth observation data with other data — about how people are being treated,” he said.

Combined with reports on the ground, Zolli pointed to how satellites gain insights into issues including human trafficking, slavery and illegal fishing.

HURDLES TO CLEAR

More work is needed to get a clearer picture of “asset level” information, according to Zolli, such as for knowing precisely who owns what plantation or palm oil concession around the world.

“We can tell you exactly what’s going on there but we can’t always tell you exactly who is responsible,” he said.

“So there’s a lot of work to do in the middle to bring this vision about.”

One of the other biggest challenges facing the industry is the lack of ESG regulations, standards and universally recognized guidelines.

Two of the most influential ESG data standards are the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB), a San Francisco nonprofit that publishes a comprehensive list of industry-specific factors, and another led by the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation (IFRS), backed by the International Federation of Accountants in Geneva.

A dizzying array of competing standards makes guidelines and comparisons challenging, and is an issue that the SEC and other regulatory bodies are moving to address.

In the meantime, Baruch said the space industry has an opportunity to “provide markets with more timely asset-level monitoring, rather than relying on annual, self-reported public disclosures from companies that may not necessarily be accurate [or] objective.”

However, ESG is still “mostly a rich person’s acronym,” Platzer added.

It is unclear how countries such as India, with more than a billion people and relatively lax environmental regulations, will adopt the movement.

That said, Platzer believes climate change poses a generational challenge for humanity.

He sees space as paramount for hitting Net Zero, the concept of taking as much carbon from the atmosphere as that going in to address climate change.

“Data from the ultimate vantage point will become more and more relevant, to more and more people, because of climate change and the flip-side of climate change which is ESG and Net Zero,” he said.

This article originally appeared in the April 19, 2021 issue of SpaceNews magazine.

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Source: https://spacenews.com/space-and-the-new-esg-business-climate/

Aerospace

Boeing wins £1.4bn MoD contract for 14 Chinook helicopters

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Boeing wins £1.4bn MoD contract for 14 Chinook helicopters

Image: MoD

Boeing has signed a £1.4 billion contract with the Ministry of Defence for 14 Chinook heavy-lift helicopters.

The order for the new aircraft signals the commitment made by the MoD in the recent Defence Command Paper to invest over £85 billion on military equipment over the next four years to reform and renew the UK Armed Forces.

The move is a boost to Boeing, which has been looking to line up new customers for the helicopters, which are built at its plant outside Philadelphia in the US. The order will help guard against a potential closing of the facility after the US.Army sought to scale back its orders.

Defence secretary Ben Wallace said: “From assisting emergency repairs to UK flood defences, providing vital logistics support during COVID-19 to its warfighting role on Afghan battlefields, the Chinook has been the workhorse of the Armed Forces for over 40 years.

“The cutting edge H-47 (ER) will be at the forefront of our specialist requirements in dealing with threats and logistic support. Our £1.4 billion investment will mean we will be one of very few air forces with this capability.”

The helicopter can operate in a diverse range of environments, from the desert to the arctic, and transport up to 55 personnel or ten tonnes of cargo.

With a top speed of 300 kilometres per hour, the new H-47(ER) aircraft will have a range of new capabilities, including:

  • An advanced digital cockpit
  • A modernised airframe to increase stability and improve survivability
  • A digital automatic flight control system to allow pilots to hover in areas of limited visibility.

The 14 aircraft will be purchased from the US via a Foreign Military Sales agreement and includes development and manufacture over the next decade. Deliveries are scheduled to start in 2026.

The new helicopters will be based at RAF Odiham, the home of the Chinook fleet.

In addition to traditional warfighting roles, the Chinook supports a wide variety of specialist tasks, including the military aid to the civil authorities. Most recently, it was part of the Joint Helicopter Aviation Task Force which transported NHS paramedics, equipment and patients during peak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Introduced into service in 1981, the 40th anniversary of the first Chinook was recently celebrated with a new commemorative colour scheme.

The oldest of fleet will be retired, enabling investment in the new aircraft to modernise the UK heavy lift capability.

www.boeing.com

www.gov.uk/mod

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Low volume manufacturing demand grows

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Low volume manufacturing demand grows

Chris Ford, managing director at Ford Aerospace

Covid-19 placed immense pressure on all aspects of manufacturing, from supply chain challenges to unstable and unpredictable demand. It has, though, created opportunities for manufacturers that can offer agile, low-volume outputs, explains Chris Ford, managing director at Ford Aerospace.

At Ford Aerospace, the impact of the pandemic gave us the opportunity to play to some of our key strengths, such as agility, adaptability and customer care. Like other companies, we have used the slight dip in activity to make operational improvements, implementing more training and identifying areas of the business we want to improve.

For the manufacturing sector, there is now a big focus on recovery and opportunity, and we have a significant role to play in supporting businesses in these areas.

While many companies view low-quantity production runs as an unnecessary headache: many companies are just not structured to process low quantities economically and there is a widely-held belief across the industry that low-volume production of parts doesn’t generate enough of a margin to be profitable.

However, that is an area in which we have really been able to differentiate ourselves over the years. At Ford Aerospace, we are not only prepared to handle low volume manufacturing, but we have spent time to adapt our technologies to make our products more cost-effective.

Recent years have seen an increasing appetite for low-volume manufacturing (LVM) and I have every reason to believe that this is going to continue for at least the next decade.

Right now, we’re seeing demand for even more bespoke products throughout the supply chain, from OEMs to end-users. Therefore, we know we can respond to this new requirement.

Our core capabilities mean that we offer a diverse range of services to customers – no matter how big or small a job is and it has proved a powerful catalyst for growth. We can produce customer designed products to the aerospace and defence industry in quantities ranging from single items to large batches of 50,000.

We now produce a huge range of precision machined, pressed and laser-cut components as well as Ford-branded Easipeel laminated products for a range of different businesses within the supply chain. We have even developed a unique method of producing thin gauge shims through our low-cost tooling capability.

Ford Engineering has worked with many UK-based companies on this basis to produce high precision laminate shim components for OEMs. We have a tried and tested methodology that has resulted in a strong reputation in the industry for producing first-class components and mechanical assemblies at an affordable price.

It’s not just about whether we can get an OEM a part though, it’s what’s actually best for their needs. We know OEMs want what’s right for a project, so we are always searching for new ways to tackle manufacturing issues and take pride in delivering an attractive solution.

With low-volume manufacturing set to increase in importance, and as the number of businesses asking for this type of work rises, I think we’re going to see a trend towards a more high-speed bespoke supply chain in the next few years and more personalised manufacturing.

This is something we have been doing successfully for four decades because we know our customers want products that are customised and delivered to them as quickly as possible.

Manufacturing products for other markets and building alliances with new companies is nothing new to us, but in the current climate it’s more important than ever to be able to find opportunities.

Our approach has always been to simply talk to customers to identify where they have needed help as a route to finding new business. From an industry recognition standpoint, our family-run business has received several accolades over the years. The uptick in the popularity of our services always comes down to own thing – the customer relationships we have fostered.

www.ford-engineering.com

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You’ve got to roll with it!

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You’ve got to roll with it!

The RollerFORM XL large coverage wheel probe

Olympus’ recently-launched RollerFORM XL scanner answers the demand for a wide-coverage and easy-to-implement phased array tool to accelerate the inspection of composite components with large surface areas. Olympus Scientific Solutions product manager, scanners & inspection solutions, Simon Alain, explains more.

In the aerospace industry, critical components such as aircraft wings are made with lightweight, durable composite material. Inspectors use non-destructive testing technology to ensure the integrity of these parts, both before they are assembled and for in-service maintenance. Ultrasonic testing is a standard method, but the parts’ extensive surface areas, the attenuative nature of composite and the complicated operation of some ultrasonic testing equipment can cause problems. Olympus’ new RollerFORM XL scanner is an innovative and easy-to-use phased array wheel probe that is all set to help resolve these issues.

Q) Firstly, please bring me up to speed with the latest news regarding new equipment.

To keep up with industry requirements, Olympus is working hard to launch solutions that bring value to our customers. Recently, we have emphasised the development of solutions for friction stir weld (FSW) inspection to address the growing use of welded metals. The automated solution includes a robot arm that precisely performs the inspection of the welds, reducing human errors. The use of ultrasonic phased array with multiple beam angles allows for the detection of randomly oriented defects, which are typical of friction stir welds.

Standard ultrasonic phased array vs CAF data comparison

We also recently launched the RollerFORM XL phased array wheel probe. This new inspection solution has features that allow simple yet efficient inspection of large surfaces, such as aircraft wings. Because this probe is contained in an acoustic-friendly material filled with water, it is like using a small immersion tank on the go and makes it easier to conform to curved surfaces.

Q) What types of CFRP wing testing performance demands are placed on you by today’s designers?

Wing inspections are particular in few ways. First, their shape includes curved sections that can be a challenge to inspect. Also, the region of interest may be on the top or on the bottom of the wing, requiring overhead inspection capability. For those reasons, it is important to develop tools that can be easily used by the inspectors regardless of shape and scanning orientation. The RollerFORM XL probe is a good example of a versatile tool that can be used in different conditions. We also recently developed a large, two-axis scanner that attaches to the surface using optional venturi-activated suction cups. This new version of the GLIDER scanner enables the inspection of large wing surfaces, even in an upside-down position.

Q) What are the most common examples of wing testing method types, i.e., NDT, ultrasound, and phased array?

The large coverage GLIDER XY encoder scanner

Olympus’ aerospace inspection solutions include technologies such as conventional ultrasound (UT), phased array UT, bond testing, and eddy current array. These technologies can be used manually or in conjunction with encoded scanners to perform complete 2D mapping. Ultrasound techniques are used at 0 degrees or an angle beam in pulse echo mode to inspect the volume of composite materials for delaminations or metals for corrosion or other defects. While eddy current can also perform corrosion inspection of thin metal sheets, it is the preferred tool for detection of surface defects in metals or cracks around rivet holes. The bond testing technique uses a pitch-catch mode to generate a vibration on a material and listen to the vibration differences, enabling the detection of disbonds. This is particularly powerful for the inspection of honeycomb structures.

Q) Are you being forced to look at different methods as the shapes/sizes of composite test pieces become increasingly varied and complex?

Absolutely. Positioning an ultrasonic probe according to a surface is essential to ensure reliable data. In fact, we developed the cohesive adaptive focusing (CAF) acquisition strategy to simplify the inspection of variable radiuses or opening angle components and compensate for probe misalignment by using innovative signal-processing algorithms. This method is used in immersion inspection of composite parts and adjusts the phased array ultrasonic beams depending on the relative positioning of the probe to the surface.

Q) Is the composites community looking for design parity with metals, which will mean development and acceptance of equivalent tests, both physically and in underpinning theory?

Materials modernisation is something we are always aware of and adapting to. More robust materials don’t necessarily mean more challenging inspections; sometimes it just means we need a new approach. Luckily, there are a multitude of non-destructive methods to choose from, and they all have their strengths and specialties to match the given material.

Q) In terms of your R&D, where is the main emphasis — more innovations in the hardware or the software?

We usually work on both in parallel. A solution is composed of many tools that wouldn’t be useful by themselves. It is only once they are combined that those tools enable an application to be solved. Depending on the application, those tools will either come from improvements in an existing product or the development of totally new product. Although our instruments are developed to be as flexible as possible, it is common to have to develop the probe, scanner, and software to bring the solution to a level where it will not only provide quality data but will also be easy to use and implement by the customer.

Q) How much of a role can simulation & visualisation software play in the composites testing arena?

An important feature that we brought to the market when we launched the OmniScan X3 flaw detector is the Acoustic Influence Map (AIM), an onboard simulation of the UT amplitude that’s expected in a specific region from a known defect. This software visualisation tool is used to help our customers decide if their hardware and acoustic beam combination will provide reliable data. It is very useful for an inspector to know what to expect prior to the inspection, but also to confirm that the findings (if any) make sense and are relevant. The simulation tool gives that confirmation.

Q) What composite wing-related testing developments will we be seeing in the future?

The industry is always aiming to go faster without compromising the accuracy and repeatability of the results. Ultimately, this is all about safety, so there’s no room for error. We are always working to create more tools to limit human error, make the inspector’s life easier, and help keep people safe.

www.olympus-ims.com

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Aerospace

You’ve got to roll with it!

Avatar

Published

on

You’ve got to roll with it!

The RollerFORM XL large coverage wheel probe

Olympus’ recently-launched RollerFORM XL scanner answers the demand for a wide-coverage and easy-to-implement phased array tool to accelerate the inspection of composite components with large surface areas. Olympus Scientific Solutions product manager, scanners & inspection solutions, Simon Alain, explains more.

In the aerospace industry, critical components such as aircraft wings are made with lightweight, durable composite material. Inspectors use non-destructive testing technology to ensure the integrity of these parts, both before they are assembled and for in-service maintenance. Ultrasonic testing is a standard method, but the parts’ extensive surface areas, the attenuative nature of composite and the complicated operation of some ultrasonic testing equipment can cause problems. Olympus’ new RollerFORM XL scanner is an innovative and easy-to-use phased array wheel probe that is all set to help resolve these issues.

Q) Firstly, please bring me up to speed with the latest news regarding new equipment.

To keep up with industry requirements, Olympus is working hard to launch solutions that bring value to our customers. Recently, we have emphasised the development of solutions for friction stir weld (FSW) inspection to address the growing use of welded metals. The automated solution includes a robot arm that precisely performs the inspection of the welds, reducing human errors. The use of ultrasonic phased array with multiple beam angles allows for the detection of randomly oriented defects, which are typical of friction stir welds.

Standard ultrasonic phased array vs CAF data comparison

We also recently launched the RollerFORM XL phased array wheel probe. This new inspection solution has features that allow simple yet efficient inspection of large surfaces, such as aircraft wings. Because this probe is contained in an acoustic-friendly material filled with water, it is like using a small immersion tank on the go and makes it easier to conform to curved surfaces.

Q) What types of CFRP wing testing performance demands are placed on you by today’s designers?

Wing inspections are particular in few ways. First, their shape includes curved sections that can be a challenge to inspect. Also, the region of interest may be on the top or on the bottom of the wing, requiring overhead inspection capability. For those reasons, it is important to develop tools that can be easily used by the inspectors regardless of shape and scanning orientation. The RollerFORM XL probe is a good example of a versatile tool that can be used in different conditions. We also recently developed a large, two-axis scanner that attaches to the surface using optional venturi-activated suction cups. This new version of the GLIDER scanner enables the inspection of large wing surfaces, even in an upside-down position.

Q) What are the most common examples of wing testing method types, i.e., NDT, ultrasound, and phased array?

The large coverage GLIDER XY encoder scanner

Olympus’ aerospace inspection solutions include technologies such as conventional ultrasound (UT), phased array UT, bond testing, and eddy current array. These technologies can be used manually or in conjunction with encoded scanners to perform complete 2D mapping. Ultrasound techniques are used at 0 degrees or an angle beam in pulse echo mode to inspect the volume of composite materials for delaminations or metals for corrosion or other defects. While eddy current can also perform corrosion inspection of thin metal sheets, it is the preferred tool for detection of surface defects in metals or cracks around rivet holes. The bond testing technique uses a pitch-catch mode to generate a vibration on a material and listen to the vibration differences, enabling the detection of disbonds. This is particularly powerful for the inspection of honeycomb structures.

Q) Are you being forced to look at different methods as the shapes/sizes of composite test pieces become increasingly varied and complex?

Absolutely. Positioning an ultrasonic probe according to a surface is essential to ensure reliable data. In fact, we developed the cohesive adaptive focusing (CAF) acquisition strategy to simplify the inspection of variable radiuses or opening angle components and compensate for probe misalignment by using innovative signal-processing algorithms. This method is used in immersion inspection of composite parts and adjusts the phased array ultrasonic beams depending on the relative positioning of the probe to the surface.

Q) Is the composites community looking for design parity with metals, which will mean development and acceptance of equivalent tests, both physically and in underpinning theory?

Materials modernisation is something we are always aware of and adapting to. More robust materials don’t necessarily mean more challenging inspections; sometimes it just means we need a new approach. Luckily, there are a multitude of non-destructive methods to choose from, and they all have their strengths and specialties to match the given material.

Q) In terms of your R&D, where is the main emphasis — more innovations in the hardware or the software?

We usually work on both in parallel. A solution is composed of many tools that wouldn’t be useful by themselves. It is only once they are combined that those tools enable an application to be solved. Depending on the application, those tools will either come from improvements in an existing product or the development of totally new product. Although our instruments are developed to be as flexible as possible, it is common to have to develop the probe, scanner, and software to bring the solution to a level where it will not only provide quality data but will also be easy to use and implement by the customer.

Q) How much of a role can simulation & visualisation software play in the composites testing arena?

An important feature that we brought to the market when we launched the OmniScan X3 flaw detector is the Acoustic Influence Map (AIM), an onboard simulation of the UT amplitude that’s expected in a specific region from a known defect. This software visualisation tool is used to help our customers decide if their hardware and acoustic beam combination will provide reliable data. It is very useful for an inspector to know what to expect prior to the inspection, but also to confirm that the findings (if any) make sense and are relevant. The simulation tool gives that confirmation.

Q) What composite wing-related testing developments will we be seeing in the future?

The industry is always aiming to go faster without compromising the accuracy and repeatability of the results. Ultimately, this is all about safety, so there’s no room for error. We are always working to create more tools to limit human error, make the inspector’s life easier, and help keep people safe.

www.olympus-ims.com

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