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The Growth Deal will secure Prestwick’s status as a major aviation hub

With the recent Ayrshire Growth Deal announcement of £80m funding to support aerospace and space in the region, the historic aerospace hub of Prestwick is set to go from strength to strength.

Ayrshire has been at the heart of the Scottish aerospace industry for nearly a century. Beginning with Scottish Aviation in the thirties it now hosts major players like BAE Systems, GE Aviation, Spirit AeroSystems, Woodward and Collins Aerospace.

The Aerospace and Space Innovation Centre will connect the aerospace business of Prestwick to STEM education across Scotland

More than half of Scotland’s aerospace workforce is based around the Ayrshire coast, but this is set to increase. A dramatic expansion is to be backed by the Ayrshire Growth Deal, a multi-million pound investment from the Scottish and UK governments, and the three Ayrshire local authorities.

A quarter of a billion in total is going into creating high value sites and spurring the development of new sustainable industry in Ayrshire; £80 million is dedicated directly to aerospace. This will establish Prestwick as one of leading aerospace and space sector hubs in the country and provide the boost required to support the region’s aim of becoming a leading European space cluster, ideally placed to take advantage of the burgeoning global commercial ‘NewSpace’ market. Given Scotland’s expanding space sector, the deal will help establish space supply chain capabilities that go far beyond the rapidly developing Spaceflight plans, making Prestwick an innovation centre from the ground to orbit and everywhere in between.

Prestwick has long been associated with more varied aviation activities, from opening Scotland to transatlantic services, supporting military aviation and even occasionally welcoming giant Antonov heavy lifters shuttling airframe components. Aircraft and major subassemblies have been built here since the 1940s, and Spirit continue to operate from Scottish Aviation’s swooshing Art Deco building (itself repurposed from Glasgow’s 1938 Empire exhibition), alongside newer facilities. The Growth Deal funding will support enhanced industrial facilities, laboratories, testing centres and skills development.

The final frontier

The investment will bring to life Prestwick’s long interests in the space sector; new commercial build facilities will provide a base for space technology companies beyond the developing horizontal launch capability. With nearby Glasgow connected by road and rail, and already a centre of small satellite manufacturing, Prestwick is looking to accommodate NewSpace enterprises, building space structures, vehicles, or their engines. Numerous partners are in discussions already with South Ayrshire Council, which could lead to, amongst many things, providing test and evaluation services for space missions, like vibration sensitivity or electromagnetic compatibility. Further in the future, Prestwick has a long-held ambition to see human missions reach space from Ayrshire, and to become a centre for microgravity research.

A flagship part of the new enterprises will be a brand-new Aerospace and Space Innovation Centre – publicly open visitor centre and innovation hub, aimed at connecting the aerospace business of Prestwick to STEM education across Scotland, disseminating the activities of the cluster to the local community, and providing a home for research, business incubation and training.

This centre will also be the focus of partnerships with local and national education institutes; including the Universities of Edinburgh, Strathclyde and West of Scotland. A particularly important link will be that with Ayrshire College, building critical engineering skills in the local community. The transport connectivity between Ayrshire and everywhere else, via road, rail, and even air and sea, is something that provides a real advantage to the area and makes such partnerships, and many more, possible.

There are further developments ongoing beyond the deal itself, with the Scottish Government contributing to two projects through its Advancing Manufacturing Challenge Fund (AMCF), aimed at supporting small-to-medium companies in the West of Scotland. These projects are the ‘Supply Chain AeroSpace’, and the ‘Aerospace Digital Visualisation Suite’, and have been established through a collective bid from South Ayrshire Council, Ayrshire College, the University of Strathclyde and the Ayrshire Engineering Alliance, successfully securing two million pounds of investment.

Spirit continue to operate from Scottish Aviation’s Art Deco building, alongside newer facilities

The Supply Chain AeroSpace project helps small companies establish themselves in the Scottish aerospace supply chain; and the Aerospace Digital Visualisation Suite provides data visualisation, augmented reality and virtual reality expertise to companies starting out in -these powerful, and fast evolving technologies.

Skills and training are only part of the benefits projected for the area from the Ayrshire Growth Deal. The enhancement of the aerospace sector is forecast to add 4,000 jobs to the broader Ayrshire area. The commercial developments are also paired with planned improvements to transport infrastructure.

Significantly, Prestwick plans to reach beyond the industry, beyond launch, and to inspire the local communities and young people planning for a career. The visitor centre will provide outreach across all ages, whilst explaining and expounding the stories of this exciting site and industry, becoming a centre for education and a new tourist attraction for Ayrshire in its own right.

The Growth Deal will secure Prestwick’s status as a major aviation hub and spur its growth as a major space industry hub too, building new facilities, building links to the local communities, building skills and spacecraft too. It will bring a significant number of new high quality technical jobs to the area, and forge strong educational outreach programmes; inspiring school children to become the aerospace engineers, and perhaps even astronauts, of the future!

www.prestwickaerospace.com

www.am-aerospace.co.uk

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Rocket Lab returns to service with “flawless” launch for U.S. military

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Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle lifts off at 2 a.m. EDT (0600 GMT; 6 p.m. local time) Thursday from Zealand. Credit: Rocket Lab

Resuming launches after a mission failure two months ago, Rocket Lab successfully placed a small U.S. military research and development satellite into orbit Thursday following a fiery liftoff from New Zealand on a flight that was originally supposed to launch from the company’s new pad in Virginia.

The 59-foot-tall (18-meter) Electron rocket ignited its nine kerosene-fueled Rutherford engines and climbed away from Launch Complex 1 on the North Island of New Zealand at 2 a.m. EDT (0600 GMT) Thursday.

Liftoff from Rocket Lab’s privately-owned launch base on Mahia Peninsula occurred at 6 p.m. local time, just after sunset.

Heading east from Mahia, the rocket’s first stage burned its nine engines for about two-and-a-half minutes, followed by a six-minute firing of the second stage engine to reach a preliminary parking orbit.

A kick stage deployed from the the Electron rocket’s second stage to begin a coast across the Pacific Ocean, Central America, and the Caribbean Sea before igniting its Curie engine reach a circular orbit about 372 miles (600 kilometers) above Earth at an inclination of 37 degrees to the equator.

Rocket Lab, a California-based company founded in New Zealand, confirmed a good deployment of the U.S. military’s small experimental Monolith spacecraft about 52 minutes after liftoff.

“Payload deployed, flawless launch and mission by the team!” tweeted Peter Beck, Rocket Lab’s founder and CEO.

The mission was the 21st flight of a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle since 2017, and the eighth to carry a payload for a U.S. military or intelligence agency customer.

It was also the first Rocket Lab mission since May 15, when an Electron rocket failed before reaching orbit with two commercial BlackSky Earth-imaging satellites.

Rocket Lab’s internal investigation, with oversight from the Federal Aviation Administration, concluded the failure was caused by a problem with the igniter system on the Electron launcher’s second stage engine.

“This induced a corruption of signals within the engine computer that caused the Rutherford engine’s thrust vector control (TVC) to deviate outside nominal parameters and resulted in the engine computer commanding zero pump speed, shutting down the engine,” Rocket Lab said in a statement earlier this month.

Live video from beamed down from the rocket May 15 showed the second stage’s kerosene-fueled Rutherford engine igniting and immediately begin to tumble about three minutes into the flight. The engine shut down prematurely after firing for a few seconds, well short of a planned six-minute burn.

The rocket and its two BlackSky payloads fell into the Pacific Ocean downrange from the launch site in New Zealand.

Rocket Lab said the igniter problem “resulted from a previously undetectable failure mode within the ignition system that occurs under a unique set of environmental pressures and conditions.”

The company said engineers found no evidence of the problem during pre-flight testing, which included more than 400 seconds of burn time for the same engine. But Rocket Lab said it was able to replicate the issue after the flight, and teams “implemented redundancies in the ignition system to prevent any future reoccurrence, including modifications to the igniter’s design and manufacture.”

The May 15 mission was the third time an Electron rocket failed to reach orbit on 20 attempts since 2017.

Engineers traced the cause of an Electron second stage failure in July 2020 to a faulty electrical connector, which detached in flight and led to an early engine shutdown, dooming seven small commercial satellites.

Rocket Lab said it implemented improved testing to better screen for bad connectors, and the company successfully launched its next Electron mission less than two months later.

Rocket Lab racked up six straight successful Electron missions before the launch failure May 15. The company’s first orbital launch attempt in 2017 failed to reach orbit due to a ground system failure that caused safety teams to send a flight termination command to the rocket.

The small launch company says it is ready to resume a busy flight cadence through the rest of the year. Rocket Lab is close to beginning launches from two new pads — one in Virginia and another adjacent to its existing launch complex in New Zealand — to accommodate a more rapid flight rate.

Thursday’s mission, designated STP-27RM, was originally supposed to launch from Rocket Lab’s new pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, located at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. But delays in NASA’s certification of the Electron rocket’s new autonomous flight safety system have kept Rocket Lab from beginning service from the Virginia launch base.

In June, officials at Wallops said they hope to complete certification of the new autonomous flight safety system by the end of the year, enabling the first Rocket Lab launch from U.S. soil. With the launch of the military’s Monolith mission moved from Virginia to New Zealand, Rocket Lab’s first flight from Launch Complex 2 at Wallops will likely launch NASA’s CAPSTONE CubeSat payload to the moon.

The CAPSTONE mission is scheduled for launch late this year, according to NASA and Rocket Lab.

The Space Test Program, which helps manage development of the military’s experimental satellites, procured the launch of the Monolith satellite with the Rocket Systems Launch Program, part of the Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center.

Other partners on the mission include the Defense Innovation Unit and the Rapid Agile Launch Initiative, a program that books rides to orbit for small military satellites on emerging commercial small satellite launchers.

The Monolith satellite, built by the non-profit Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University, will demonstrate the use of a deployable sensor that is relatively large in mass compared to the mass of the spacecraft itself, according to the Space and Missile Systems Center.

The deployment of the sensor will change the satellite’s dynamic properties, testing the spacecraft’s ability to maintain stable attitude control, military officials said.

When the military announced the Monolith mission in 2019, officials said the satellite’s sensor package is aimed at space weather monitoring.

Data from the Monolith mission will help engineers design future small satellites to host deployable sensors, such as weather monitoring instruments. The Space Force said that will help reduce the cost, complexity, and development timelines of future missions.

“The satellite will also provide a platform to test future space protection capabilities,” the Space Force said.

Rocket Lab did not attempt to recover the Electron rocket’s first stage booster on Thursday’s mission. The company has retrieved two Electron boosters from the Pacific Ocean as engineers move toward reusing the rocket’s first stage, an innovation Rocket Lab says will allow for a faster launch rate and lower costs.

Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket is sized to deliver small satellites to orbit, providing a dedicated ride for spacecraft that would otherwise have to fly as a lower-priority payload on a larger launch vehicle.

The Electron rocket can deliver a payload of up to 440 pounds (200 kilograms) to a 310-mile-high (500-kilometer) sun-synchronous orbit, about 1% of the lift capability of a SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher. Rocket Lab sells dedicated Electron missions for as little as $7 million.

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Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/07/29/rocket-lab-returns-to-service-with-flawless-launch-for-u-s-military/

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Aerospace

Keysight Technologies Holds Aerospace Defense Symposium in India August 25-26, 2021

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Keysight Technologies enables customers to learn about the latest electronic test at the Aerospace Defense Symposium 2021 India.  Keysight experts will present vital information relating to the next generation of aerospace defense technology, in addition to demonstrations of the company’s solutions for this dynamic industry, which include next-generation spectrum analyzers, signal sources, vector network analyzers, ultra high bandwidth oscilloscopes, among others.

When:             August 25th – 26th 2021

Where:            Virtual: https://connectlp.keysight.com/Aerospace-Defense-Symposium-India-2021

Keysight will present on a wide variety of topics relevant to the aerospace and defence industry as follows:

Day 1:             August 25, 2021 | 10:00 a.m. IST – 1:00 p.m. IST

Topics include:

  • Understanding technological advances in ultra-wideband mmwave signal generation and analysis for radar and satellite
  • Millimeter-wave frequency bands provide wide available bandwidths that enable high-throughput data, range resolution, accuracy and low latency. Keysight will discuss how technological advances help facilitate rapid measurements with ultra-wideband mmwave signal generation and analysis for radar and satellite applications.
  • Deep dive into Multichannel radio frequency/radar analysis with time domain instrumentation
    • With the advancement in time domain instrumentation, traditional radio frequency (RF) measurements no longer “separate” from the digital design engineer. Time domain instrumentation like next generation multi-channel oscilloscopes can help with RF analysis. Keysight will showcase how multichannel RF/radar analysis can be executed with time domain instrumentation tools.
  • Modulation distortion, noise power ratio (NPR), phase noise measurements with next generation network analysis
    • Modern network analysis tools help speed state of the art measurements including NPR, modulation distortion, and phase noise measurements. Keysight will discuss how the company’s network analyzers will help customers achieve desired measurements.
  • Seamless test methodologies for modern deceptive jamming designs
    • Digital radio frequency memory (DRFM) takes RF signals, digitizes them, and then creates new RF energy based on the pulse received. With a fast turnaround time, it can be used to create multiple false targets. Keysight will explore DRFM and its advantages during this session.

Day 2: August 26, 2021 | 10:00 a.m. IST – 1:00 p.m. IST

  • Demystifying complex test scenarios for aerospace defense applications with Keysight’s PathWave Test Automation software
    • Keysight’s PathWave Test Automation software enables customer to save time with connected test workflows. In this session, Keysight experts will present how to address complex test scenarios in aerospace defense applications.
  • Compact mmWave receiver design for military satellite communication with Keysight’s PathWave Advanced Design System (ADS) software
    • First time right system design ensures that a customer’s system has a competitive advantage. Keysight will discuss how PathWave ADS helps seamlessly design mmWave receivers for military satellite communication.
  • Quantum and optical communication in aerospace defense | challenges and solutions
    • As the end of Moore’s law draws near, quantum technology provides the means to achieve breakthroughs in computing. The unique properties of superposition and entanglement enable previously unimagined performance in quantum applications such as computing, communications and sensing. Keysight experts will discuss how quantum technology and optical communication go hand in hand.
  • Sneak-peek into 5G technology advancements in Aerospace Defense & Military
    • The expansion of 5G design for military and tactical applications has created specific requirements for successful implementation. Whether it is radar or satellite, 5G will play a vital role moving forward. Keysight will deliver a sneak peek into how 5G technological advancements will be leveraged in aerospace, defense and the military.

For more information, visit www.keysight.com 

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Source: https://www.eletimes.com/keysight-technologies-holds-aerospace-defense-symposium-in-india-august-25-26-2021

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Live coverage: Rocket Lab set for return-to-flight launch Thursday

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Live coverage of the countdown and launch of a Rocket Lab Electron rocket from Launch Complex 1 on Mahia Peninsula in New Zealand carrying the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Monolith microsatellite. Text updates will appear automatically below. Follow us on Twitter.

Rocket Lab’s live video webcast begins approximately 20 minutes prior to launch, and will be available on this page.

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Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/07/29/rocket-lab-stp-27rm-mission-status-center/

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Aerospace

Live coverage: Rocket Lab set for return-to-flight launch Thursday

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Live coverage of the countdown and launch of a Rocket Lab Electron rocket from Launch Complex 1 on Mahia Peninsula in New Zealand carrying the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Monolith microsatellite. Text updates will appear automatically below. Follow us on Twitter.

Rocket Lab’s live video webcast begins approximately 20 minutes prior to launch, and will be available on this page.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/07/29/rocket-lab-stp-27rm-mission-status-center/

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