Connect with us

Crowdfunding

$100,000,000 raised for creative projects and Aussie businesses

Published

on

⁠‏‏‏‎ ‎‎

Our year, like everyone else, has been full of unexpected events and turns. But what is really heartwarming and encouraging is to see our wider community supporting local projects and backing Aussie business to lead the charge forward to what will be the new normal.

This time has proven that while things are tough, anyone can access the tools to create real change from their own homes and can reach a wide network of like-minded supporters if they have a strong story to tell.

We have recently released some new tools for creators and supported local campaigns to raise the funds they need to make their projects a reality. We have also been working with local creatives, organisations and partners to raise awareness and funding for a range of projects and are always open to having a chat about your next project.

Start your own crowdfunding campaign today!

There have now been over 15,700 successful campaigns on the Pozible platform, ranging from environmental and social causes, feature and indie film productions, arts and theatre productions, independent publishing and music projects, and everything else in between.

Most recently, the Pozible platform has seen some successful campaigns from iconic live-music venue Cherry Bar raising $77K, a new Sydney start-up distillery Finders Distillery receiving $22K, and an amazing campaign to thank essential services workers with a beer from The Good Beer Co. raising over $52K.

Check out some more campaigns currently live on Pozible here.

⁠‏‏‏‎ ‎‎

⁠‏“A decade on, it’s really inspiring to see what we built being used as a powerful tool and model to help the creative industries in unprecedented times”

— Alan Crabbe co-founder of Pozible and Birchal.

⁠‏‏‏‎ ‎‎

⁠‏Birchal was first founded by Pozible co-founder Alan Crabbe and Matt Vitale in late 2017, and since then has gone from strength to strength — completing 45 successful equity crowdfunding raises for Australian brands and startups. From a successful raise of $1.8 million for Eco-tech company Seabin Project earlier this year, to a record-breaking campaign for Outland Denim that achieved $1.3 million from nearly 1,000 investors.

Source: https://blog.pozible.com/100-000-000-raised-for-creative-projects-and-aussie-businesses-b23ff3bc9206?source=rss—-ae0d23b22248—4

Crowdfunding

‘Good ideas, good work and good luck’: Australian grassroots campaigners on how they got it done

Published

on

‘Good ideas, good work and good luck’: Australian grassroots campaigners on how they got it done

From town hall meetings to QR codes and crowdfunding, three environmental campaigners share the practical tips that helped make their work effective

Edwina Robinsons wears a black top and jeans in front of tall, thick green plants

Last modified on Fri 24 Sep 2021 16.34 EDT

If you’ve ever signed a petition, written a cranky letter to your local MP or joined a protest there’s a good chance you’ve been part of an grassroots campaign, but what does it take to actually start one? How do you bring people together to solve a common problem and how do you increase your chances of success?

We asked some of the people behind three successful campaigns for the practical advice they learned along the way.

The small-town organiser

In 2009 the small New South Wales town of Bundanoon was streets ahead of today’s single-use plastic bans when it became the world’s first municipality to refuse to sell bottled water.

Huw Kingston, who worked with his neighbours in the town of Bundanoon to ban plastic bottles in 2009.

Local residents overwhelmingly supported the ban at a town meeting, voting 354 to one, cementing their long-term opposition to a multinational company’s bid to extract 50m litres of water a year from a nearby bore.

The “Bundy on Tap” campaign became international news, which local businessman Huw Kingston puts down to “a combination of good ideas, good work and good luck”.

At the time, Kingston ran the town’s bike shop and cafe. He floated the idea of a ban in a letter to the local paper, suggesting it was hypocritical to oppose water mining while selling bottled water. The idea caught on and a committee was formed to investigate.

Kingston says education about the environmental impact of bottled water was the key to getting everyone on side, including businesses and local event organisers, although they faced stiff opposition.

He says arguing respectfully with the industry helped their cause: “It was good to do a lot of debates on talkback radio and help them dig themselves in a bigger and bigger hole.”

What begin as a fairly simple plan took off once the world noticed: “We wanted to make a point that we didn’t want the water extraction plant. We would get rid of the product, put a few signs up in town and get a bit of extra notoriety.”

However, the international media attention meant that companies wanting to be on the winning side supplied Bundanoon with free reusable water bottles and public water fountains.

Schoolchildren queue to drink from a new public drinking fountain on the first day of a bottled water ban in the Southern Highlands community of Bundanoon on September 26, 2009. The 2,000-person town pulled all bottled water from its shelves and replaced them with refillable bottles in what is believed to be a world-first ban. AFP PHOTO/Penny SPANKIE (Photo credit should read Penny SPANKIE/AFP/Getty Images)

Kingston wouldn’t advise others to attempt a complete ban: “We were able to do it in a small town with 15 or so businesses, but you couldn’t do it elsewhere without legislation. The main game is bringing back the water fountain.”

“We wanted to give people a choice. They can go into a shop and waste their money on a plastic bottle of water, or they can go on to the street and fill up from a fountain or fill up at a cafe.”

The social strategist

Australian Capital Territory landscape architect Edwina Robinson’s campaign to establish “a climate-cooling microforest in every urban hotspot in Australia” was sparked in 2019, during Australia’s hottest, driest summer on record: “I wanted to do something about it, so I came up with the idea of creating microforests, which are dense pockets of climate-ready native vegetation that cool the landscape, provide habitat, enhance community wellbeing and give hope for the future.”

Robinson’s idea became reality when she participated in a social enterprise incubator program and launched a StartSomeGood crowdfunding campaign. She began emailing her network of friends and environmental design colleagues and posting on her Facebook page and LinkedIn – in 30 days she had raised $23,000 to establish the ACT’s first microforest in a “dusty, weedy” public park in Downer.

Liz, Purdie and their kids in the Downer Microforest

Robinson worked through the paperwork from four government departments to get permission and motivated hundreds of volunteers to join four community working bees to build 450 sq metres of garden beds.

A carer group and planting volunteers were sourced from a mailing list compiled during community consultations, as well as through local publicity: “We advertised in the local newsletter and I put events on Eventbrite and linked people through to my social media.”

The first microforest quickly inspired two others. Purdie Bowden and Elizabeth Adcock from the neighbouring suburb of Watson contacted Robinson, wanting to do the same thing. Robinson made introductions, creating a new microforest powerhouse. The trio quickly set up a dedicated website and Facebook page and launched their own crowdfunding campaign. They raised $53,000 in 40 days with the help of an extensive social network, including school families, and QR code on the website that linked to the fundraiser.

Robinson said she met regularly with the Watson team to share tips and resources then, once the Downer microforest was established, she documented the whole project to share with them and any other interested groups.

“We say to people, they don’t have to be experts because we team you up with the experts, no matter where you live. We’re inviting people to do something great in their community and I think people really like that.”

The persistent letter-writer

A large bunch of balloons released 300km away is the last thing you expect to find on a beach walk. But when Karen Joynes, a community environmental activist from the south coast of New South Wales, found 14 deflating balloons branded with logos from Albury city council and a soccer team, it only took her a few phone calls to find out they had drifted from the border town overnight: “I called council and they confirmed that a bunch of balloons had been released at the game the day before. I followed up with the Bureau of Meteorology and they confirmed that it was possible.”

The 2014 discovery prompted Joynes to start tallying the numbers of balloons washing up on her local, remote beach. She says balloons are one of the most deadly forms of litter for seabirds and marine life, even when advertised as “biodegradable”.

Joynes described these risks to sea life to a local shopkeeper who started selling helium balloons in 2016. She begged the retailer to ask her customers not to release the balloons. When that request was refused, Joynes decided she would have to do something herself. She connected with two other women, Victorian Amy Motherwell and Western Australian Lisa Hills, to found No Balloon Release Australia and launch a petition asking the federal government to ban helium balloon releases, and the use of helium to inflate balloons.

Joynes writes to every new state, territory or federal environmental minister about the environmental dangers of balloon releases, and pens new letters every time there’s “a mass balloon release or some new research comes out, saying, ‘Here’s another example of why we need to take action’.” She also writes to public servants: “It’s really useful to contact those people because a lot of them are involved in policy and can tell me this issue is coming up repeatedly, and they can make recommendations to the minister.”

She says existing state litter laws are rarely enforced for balloon releases: “A lot of the time the releases are in memory of someone who’s died tragically, so it’s really hard to fine people in that situation.”

After five years of campaigning, in July 2021 Joyce celebrated Victoria becoming the first Australian state to outlaw balloon release: “We’re hoping it’s a tipping point, that other states will see that it can be done and it’s been well received.”

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/sep/25/good-ideas-good-work-and-good-luck-australian-grassroots-campaigners-on-how-they-got-it-done

Continue Reading

Crowdfunding

This Beer is Illegal in 15 States

Published

on

You rely on Crowdability to bring you the best start-up deals. Now rely on us to bring you the most fascinating stories and trends from the world of technology. You won’t find this stuff in the mainstream press. Look for it every Friday morning.

A Juicy Steak — from a Vending Machine?

Originally, they sold candy, cigarettes, and sodas. Today they offer everything from headphones to cars. What’s next for vending machines? A juicy ribeye »

The Science Behind that “New Car” Smell

It ranks among the best scents in the world, up there with fresh-cut grass and warm cinnamon buns. But what exactly is that “new car” smell? Sniff out the answer right here »

Don’t Buy the iPhone 13!

Apple just announced the iPhone 13. But there’s already speculation about its next blockbuster smart phone. And based on the rumors, it might be worth the wait »

Netflix for Cars

Through a new service, you can get behind the wheel of a futuristic car whenever you’d like. There’s nothing to own, and no hassles to deal with. Intrigued? »

This Beer is Illegal in 15 States

American brewer Samuel Adams is launching a limited-edition beer. But it packs such a punch, it’s illegal in nearly a third of the country. Get the scoop »

Comments

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.crowdability.com/article/this-beer-is-illegal-in-15-states

Continue Reading

Crowdfunding

Meet the Founder, Wearth London

Published

on

A group of 2,000 adults said they would spend 12 percent more on sustainable items on top of the annual household expenses of approximately £30,000. That makes sense as you only have to spend a bit of time researching about the products we use on a daily basis to understand how they’ve contributed negatively to the Earth today. 

However, finding eco-friendly products is difficult. A lot of the brands out there are small and independent, with limited resources to market themselves. Imogen Minoli and Ed Davies noticed this back in 2017 when they launched Wearth London, an online marketplace building a greener future.

We had the opportunity to speak to Ed about his journey building Wearth London, and helping people live a sustainable lifestyle.

As a consumer, what were your challenges when looking for eco-friendly products?

In the lead up to starting Wearth, Imogen & I were starting to want to make more sustainable choices after learning about how our own consumer habits impact the planet around us. We started looking for products which aligned with our values, but which were also high quality, contemporary items which fit into our homes. We found it difficult to find these and it was quite an overwhelming experience at times knowing where to start. 

Why did you start Wearth London and why does the e-commerce industry need it?

After initially finding it difficult to find products which aligned with our values. We ended up doing a lot of deep dives into the internet and eventually found there were lots of independent UK brands out there which make amazing sustainable & ethical products. 

We wanted to create an online platform which brought these brands and makers into one place online. An important aim is to help empower consumers and make it easier for people to make greener swaps. Our ethos is that anyone can make a difference and even small changes here and there can make a difference. 

Transparency is an important aspect here and in the ecommerce industry in general it can be difficult to know why a product is eco-friendly just because it says it is so. This is why on Wearth you can see what the product is made from, its delivery packaging and its main values (e.g. plastic-free, made in the UK and so on). As a result, the customer can make an informed purchase and understand why this product is on Wearth. 

You have more than 250 independent sustainable brands in your marketplace. How do brands benefit from being stocked on Wearth London? 

Our brands are at the heart of Wearth and we work closely with our partner brands. Our aim since starting has been to not only be a revenue source for our brands, but also to create unique marketing opportunities exclusive to being part of our community. This has included influencer collaborations, for example so far we’ve had over 500k YouTube views from working with sustainable lifestyle vloggers. We have also built up our social media community over the years and now have over 110k followers where we promote our brands on a daily basis. Press features is also something we work hard on and we have enabled a number of our brands to be featured in national publications including VOGUE Magazine, The Guardian, The Financial Times & more! 

Could you tell us about some of your biggest achievements to date? 

We started Wearth just the two of us in 2017 and to date we have bootstrapped the business. Despite this, we have achieved a lot of things we are proud of. Firstly, we have been able to create well over £3m of sales for our brands with considerable growth every year, our first year we had sales of just over £30k! 

It has been amazing helping to create a new revenue stream for independent UK brands. Seeing our community grow over the years, both in terms of our social media following, but also our visitors to our website which is approaching 4 million since we launched!

Our biggest achievement to date so far has been helping our customers to shop and live more consciously in a way that helps to protect our planet. It has been inspiring hearing from our customers and how we have made it easier to find and support eco-friendly brands. 

What are your future plans for Wearth London?

We have lots of exciting plans for the future which is one of the reasons we’re raising money. Firstly, we are in the process of launching our new website, a key part of this is our new content platform which is built on WordPress. Here we will have a wide range of writers from sustainable fashion, plant-based recipes to eco news. We’re looking forward to creating a new place online to discover conscious content in one place. 

We are planning to partner with even more brands to launch new categories and improve the depth of our range. Key areas we are looking to expand our collections include homewares, fashion and our refillable range. In terms of business growth, we also plan to start delivering to Europe in 2022! 

Looking further into the future we also have plans to develop our range of innovative and unique eco-friendly products to fill gaps in the market which we have identified. This will help to further our mission of helping consumers to live and shop more consciously to protect our planet. 

If you could only pick three products, which are your favourite stocked on Wearth London and why?

Good question! There’s a number of products I use on a day to day basis, a bit of an essential one to start with but I like Fulfilled’s shampoo and conditioner. The great thing about them is that I’ve been using the same bottle for over a year now and buy the refills.

I love a good candle, maybe one of the reasons why we have so many on Wearth! I couldn’t pinpoint my favourite but I am looking forward to trying our new range of Pott Candles which come in a hand crafted ceramic pot. 

A final product I use a lot is Clean Natured’s amber dispenser jar bottles, these are great for hand soap, cleaning products and have always been popular with our customers. I would guess that Imogen would likely say the vegan brownies from Nummy would be one of her favourites! 

What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt so far building Wearth London?

Naturally there have been a lot of challenges over the past four years, especially as we’ve bootstrapped, and a lot of lessons learnt as a result! I would say the biggest lesson so far is trying not to do everything yourself and trying to build a team around you (even if some of these are freelancers in the early days) which can help turn your vision into a reality and provide more space to focus on growing the business. 

To learn more about Wearth London, and for the opportunity to invest, visit the pitch here.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.seedrs.com/insights/blog/founder-stories/meet-the-founder-of-wearth-london

Continue Reading

Crowdfunding

Meet the Founder, Wearth London

Published

on

A group of 2,000 adults said they would spend 12 percent more on sustainable items on top of the annual household expenses of approximately £30,000. That makes sense as you only have to spend a bit of time researching about the products we use on a daily basis to understand how they’ve contributed negatively to the Earth today. 

However, finding eco-friendly products is difficult. A lot of the brands out there are small and independent, with limited resources to market themselves. Imogen Minoli and Ed Davies noticed this back in 2017 when they launched Wearth London, an online marketplace building a greener future.

We had the opportunity to speak to Ed about his journey building Wearth London, and helping people live a sustainable lifestyle.

As a consumer, what were your challenges when looking for eco-friendly products?

In the lead up to starting Wearth, Imogen & I were starting to want to make more sustainable choices after learning about how our own consumer habits impact the planet around us. We started looking for products which aligned with our values, but which were also high quality, contemporary items which fit into our homes. We found it difficult to find these and it was quite an overwhelming experience at times knowing where to start. 

Why did you start Wearth London and why does the e-commerce industry need it?

After initially finding it difficult to find products which aligned with our values. We ended up doing a lot of deep dives into the internet and eventually found there were lots of independent UK brands out there which make amazing sustainable & ethical products. 

We wanted to create an online platform which brought these brands and makers into one place online. An important aim is to help empower consumers and make it easier for people to make greener swaps. Our ethos is that anyone can make a difference and even small changes here and there can make a difference. 

Transparency is an important aspect here and in the ecommerce industry in general it can be difficult to know why a product is eco-friendly just because it says it is so. This is why on Wearth you can see what the product is made from, its delivery packaging and its main values (e.g. plastic-free, made in the UK and so on). As a result, the customer can make an informed purchase and understand why this product is on Wearth. 

You have more than 250 independent sustainable brands in your marketplace. How do brands benefit from being stocked on Wearth London? 

Our brands are at the heart of Wearth and we work closely with our partner brands. Our aim since starting has been to not only be a revenue source for our brands, but also to create unique marketing opportunities exclusive to being part of our community. This has included influencer collaborations, for example so far we’ve had over 500k YouTube views from working with sustainable lifestyle vloggers. We have also built up our social media community over the years and now have over 110k followers where we promote our brands on a daily basis. Press features is also something we work hard on and we have enabled a number of our brands to be featured in national publications including VOGUE Magazine, The Guardian, The Financial Times & more! 

Could you tell us about some of your biggest achievements to date? 

We started Wearth just the two of us in 2017 and to date we have bootstrapped the business. Despite this, we have achieved a lot of things we are proud of. Firstly, we have been able to create well over £3m of sales for our brands with considerable growth every year, our first year we had sales of just over £30k! 

It has been amazing helping to create a new revenue stream for independent UK brands. Seeing our community grow over the years, both in terms of our social media following, but also our visitors to our website which is approaching 4 million since we launched!

Our biggest achievement to date so far has been helping our customers to shop and live more consciously in a way that helps to protect our planet. It has been inspiring hearing from our customers and how we have made it easier to find and support eco-friendly brands. 

What are your future plans for Wearth London?

We have lots of exciting plans for the future which is one of the reasons we’re raising money. Firstly, we are in the process of launching our new website, a key part of this is our new content platform which is built on WordPress. Here we will have a wide range of writers from sustainable fashion, plant-based recipes to eco news. We’re looking forward to creating a new place online to discover conscious content in one place. 

We are planning to partner with even more brands to launch new categories and improve the depth of our range. Key areas we are looking to expand our collections include homewares, fashion and our refillable range. In terms of business growth, we also plan to start delivering to Europe in 2022! 

Looking further into the future we also have plans to develop our range of innovative and unique eco-friendly products to fill gaps in the market which we have identified. This will help to further our mission of helping consumers to live and shop more consciously to protect our planet. 

If you could only pick three products, which are your favourite stocked on Wearth London and why?

Good question! There’s a number of products I use on a day to day basis, a bit of an essential one to start with but I like Fulfilled’s shampoo and conditioner. The great thing about them is that I’ve been using the same bottle for over a year now and buy the refills.

I love a good candle, maybe one of the reasons why we have so many on Wearth! I couldn’t pinpoint my favourite but I am looking forward to trying our new range of Pott Candles which come in a hand crafted ceramic pot. 

A final product I use a lot is Clean Natured’s amber dispenser jar bottles, these are great for hand soap, cleaning products and have always been popular with our customers. I would guess that Imogen would likely say the vegan brownies from Nummy would be one of her favourites! 

What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt so far building Wearth London?

Naturally there have been a lot of challenges over the past four years, especially as we’ve bootstrapped, and a lot of lessons learnt as a result! I would say the biggest lesson so far is trying not to do everything yourself and trying to build a team around you (even if some of these are freelancers in the early days) which can help turn your vision into a reality and provide more space to focus on growing the business. 

To learn more about Wearth London, and for the opportunity to invest, visit the pitch here.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.seedrs.com/insights/blog/founder-stories/meet-the-founder-of-wearth-london

Continue Reading
Esports3 days ago

Here are all of CS:GO’s Operation Riptide skins

Esports2 days ago

How to start a Private Queue in CS:GO

Esports2 days ago

How to complete all week one missions in Operation Riptide

Esports3 days ago

Valve reveals CS:GO Operation Riptide, featuring private queue, short competitive games, new deathmatch modes, and more

Esports4 days ago

All Fashion Week Timed Research, Finding Your Voice Special Research, and event-exclusive Field Research tasks and rewards in Pokémon Go

Esports3 days ago

Pokémon UNITE APK and OBB download links for Android

Esports1 day ago

Can You Play Diablo II: Resurrected Offline?

Esports2 days ago

CS:GO Riptide Case: Full List of New Skins

Esports3 days ago

Some players unable to claim Pokémon UNITE mobile pre-registration rewards due to new error

Esports5 days ago

nexa: “We worked really hard to get back into the shape we were in before the player break”

Esports5 days ago

Team Anarchy and STMN Esports qualify for CoD: Mobile World Championship Finals from Europe

Esports1 day ago

Failed to Enter Game, Character Could Not be Found: How to Fix Error in Diablo II: Resurrected

Covid194 days ago

Fintech Apps Sees a Surge in Downloads Amidst the Pandemic

Energy2 days ago

Carbon Nanotubes Market size worth $ 20.31 Billion, Globally, by 2028 at 17.27% CAGR: Verified Market Research®

Blockchain2 days ago

United States Infrastructure Bill Brings Cardano Billionaire to Washington.

Blockchain3 days ago

Bitcoin & Ethereum Options Expiry on September 24th, What Does This Mean for the BTC and ETH Price?

Esports1 day ago

Best Stats for the Druid in Diablo II: Resurrected

Esports2 days ago

How to redeem Operation Riptide’s rewards in CS:GO

Cyber Security4 days ago

What Is a Ticketing System?

Esports3 days ago

5 Best Counters to Vex in League of Legends

Trending