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Serbian Government In Talks To Buy 8 SJ100s For Air Serbia

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Air Serbia may soon become a Sukhoi Superjet 100 customer as the Serbian state resumes talks for the acquisition of this Russian-made aircraft. The talks were previously held just over a year ago, before COVID-19, when Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister hinted that Air Serbia might purchase eight SSJ100s.

Air Serbia SSJ100
Air Serbia’s livery could soon be on SSJ100 aircraft. Photo: SuperJet International – Sukhoi and Aeroprints.com via Wikimedia

Serbia and Russia hold talks – again

Serbia and Russia are again holding talks about the possibility of Air Serbia, the flag carrier of Serbia, acquiring Sukhoi Superjet 100 passenger aircraft as part of its fleet renewal plan.

In a statement seen by Simple Flying, the Russian Ministry of Industry and Trade announced that talks for Serbia to purchase SSJ100 aircraft for Air Serbia are ongoing and that the deal is “under consideration.”

The discussion on behalf of Russia and Serbia was held last week Friday at the Saint Petersburg International Economic Forum between the Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation, Denis Manturov, the Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation, Yuri Borisov, and Nenad Popović of the Government of Serbia.

The ongoing negotiations represent an important opportunity for Sukhoi Civil Aircraft Company which is trying to find a permanent customer in Europe outside of Russia for its SSJ100 aircraft.

Air Serbia aircraft
Air Serbia could use the SSJ100 to replace its ATR fleet, which the airline uses to operate flights on high-frequency regional feeder routes. Photo: Air Serbia

Air Serbia is in the midst of fleet renewal

Air Serbia recently retired its last several remaining Boeing 737 aircraft, and it will soon need to retire its low-capacity fleet of ATR72 aircraft too.

Less than two years ago, when the 737s were still flying, their average age was 34. The ATR72s are still flying, and six of them are over 25 years old. Even its Airbus A319 and A320 aircraft are on average 18 years old.

Air Serbia has one of the oldest fleets of any national airline in Europe, so the acquisition of brand new Sukhoi Superjet 100s would be a welcome boost to the airline’s offering. It would also reduce Air Serbia’s maintenance costs.

Aeroflot Sukhoi Superjet
Aeroflot operates the Sukhoi Superjet 100 in Europe. Photo: Getty Images

Sukhoi needs a customer

Sukhoi is very keen to find a customer in Europe to raise the profile of its SSJ100 aircraft. Presently, only Russian airline Aeroflot continues to use the aircraft in Europe on regular scheduled flights.

Previous SSJ100 customers in Europe included Brussels Airlines, which played around with the idea of acquiring the aircraft through a lease agreement with CityJet, but it ultimately did not acquire any Sukhois for itself.

Given the close relationship between the states of Russia and Serbia, and their cooperation on other projects like the Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine, it is not unlikely that Air Serbia would eventually be an airline with a permanent SSJ100 fleet.

Back when these talks were last held, there was also mention of Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport becoming the European maintenance center for Russian aircraft. This would reduce Air Serbia’s operating costs of having an SSJ100 fleet and also boost the likelihood of more airlines across Europe taking them on.

Do you think Air Serbia will become an SSJ100 operator? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/air-serbia-sukhoi-sj100-talks/

Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

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The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

Published

on

The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

Published

on

The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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Aviation

How Much Is A Boeing 717-200 Worth In 2021?

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The 717-200 is one of the quiet achievers in the Boeing stable. The aircraft was originally built by McDonnell Douglas and called the MD-95. McDonnell Douglas merged with Boeing in 1997, and two years later, the MD-95 was rebadged as the 717-200. The aircraft went to be an unsung star with operators worldwide.

boeing-717-200-worth
Delta Air Lines is one of three remaining Boeing 717-200 operators Photo: VincenzoPace/Simple Flying

So, what’s a Boeing 717-200 worth?

Boeing stopped making the 717-200 in 2006. The aircraft’s blue-chip design and manufacturing credentials, along with consistently high-quality maintenance, see 107 Boeing 717-200s still flying for a select band of airlines. But 25 years after the last Boeing 717-200 rolled off the production line, what’s a 717-200 worth these days?

According to aircraft database ch-aviation, you could expect to pay between US$3.12 to $5.64 million for a Boeing 717-200 in 2021. If that’s a little steep for your tastes, monthly leasing rates range between US$65,000 to $82,500.

There remain just three Boeing 717-200 operators, all high-quality airlines that look after their planes, thereby helping retain values. Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines still has 68 Boeing 717-200s, of which 48 are presently flying. Hawaiian Airlines has 19 of the planes, of which 15 are now flying. QantasLink has 20 of the Boeing 717-200s, with 19 in the air.

boeing-717-200-worth
Hawaiian Airlines still has 19 Boeing 717-200s. Photo: Hawaiian Airlines

Flying hours and airframe age a big influence on a plane’s value

While a high-quality owner can provide a plane a certain lustre, beyond reputation, several factors will influence what a 717-200 is worth. First and foremost are flying hours and the airframe age. Qantas’ 717-200s have an average age of 19.3 years. Hawaiian’s 717-200s are slightly older with an average age of 19.4 years. Delta’s 717-200s have an average age of 20.1 years.

Every aircraft type has a flying hours average, adjusted for the year of production. Whether a certain plane has more or less than the nominated average flying hours will impact its value.  But flying fewer hours doesn’t impact the airframe’s value as much. Age has a big value on the airframe. Early in a plane’s lifespan, flying hours have a big influence on resale value. Later in a plane’s lifespan, the age of the airframe is usually a bigger factor.

A good maintenance program is also a significant contributing factor to the resale value of a 717-200. Delta, Hawaiian, and Qantas all have sterling maintenance programs that give their aircraft better than average resale values. That said, a 20-year-old plane will never be worth as much as a five-year-old plane.

boeing-717-200-worth
Airlines like Qantas have excellent maintenance programs, helping boost aircraft resale values. Photo: Qantas

Paperwork matters when assessing aircraft resale values

Also important is the state of the aircraft’s engines and how close they are to overhaul time. The closer to overhaul time, the less the value. Then there are also seemingly lesser factors that combine to add up. Paperwork matters. Prospective buyers want to see a history of speedy responses to any airworthiness directives, engine and airframe logbooks, the current airworthiness certificate, equipment lists, weight and balance data, and flight manuals. Maintaining these records is standard at most airlines.

A 20-year-old plane will never be in as new condition, but adjusting for age, buyers will look for signs of damage and wear and tear both to the airframe and the aircraft’s interior. A new paint job can cover many sins, but sophisticated aircraft buyers know paint jobs can hide problems like corrosion.

Reputable airlines like Delta, Hawaiian, or Qantas would never pull such a stunt. Doing so would irretrievably damage their brands and impact goodwill. While the numbers of Boeing 717-200s still in the air are slowly declining, solid resale and lease rates suggest the 717-200 is still highly regarded by operators.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/boeing-717-200-worth/

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