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How to Make THC Edibles: Your Guide to DIY Edibles

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THC edibles are trending more now than ever due to their potent powers, and ease for DIY’ing at home. By infusing common recipe bases, like oil, butter or honey, the possibilities are seemingly endless for THC edibles options. Not to mention, you’ll only need a small amount of cannabis flower or oil to do so. To help navigate the growing world of homemade THC treats, we’ve put together the only guide you’ll need to make DIY edibles.

How To Make THC Edibles?

Most at-home THC edible recipes begin with the same simple base. An oil, or liquid, that’s been infused with cannabis. Meaning once you know how to make THC butter or oil, any recipe or meal that calls for these ingredients, can essentially be canna-infused. Also increasing in popularity is the infusion of cannabis into a simple syrup that can be used in hot-drinks or other recipes that could use some sweetening plus elevating. Here are the simple steps to follow to create your THC bases for a variety of baked goods, treats or recipes. Keep in mind, anywhere that cannabis flower is used, you can substitute with equal amounts of THC concentrates, like distillate, wax, etc.

How To Make THC Butter?

recipe to make thc cannabutter

Just like heat is necessary to get THC’s benefits from smoking, vaping, or dabbing…it’s also the first necessity for DIY edibles and THC butter, too. To release the beneficial cannabinoids found in cannabis, the flower must be decarboxylated or heated up, first. Follow the steps below to do so, before moving on to infusing your butter.

  1. Choose your amount of cannabis flower. For reference, the standard cannabutter recipe is 3.5 grams to 1 cup of butter. Feel free to adjust to your tolerance, or increase the recipe for bulk batches.
  2. Preheat your oven to 220℉ (105℃) and cover a baking sheet with parchment paper or foil. Break apart your cannabis flower, and spread loosely on the baking sheet.
  3. Heat the weed for approximately 30 minutes, shaking the tray every 10 minutes. You’ll know the weed is properly decarboxylated when it goes from green to a light golden brown.
  4. On a stovetop, melt your desired amount of butter in a double boiler. Add up to a cup of water to avoid scorching, when necessary.
  5. Add your decarboxylated weed to the butter and simmer in a consistent temperature between 160℉ – 200℉ for 45 minutes – 3 hours. Never allowing the butter to boil.
  6. Once your butter has been successfully infused, place a cheesecloth over a mesh strainer. Place the strainer over a glass measuring cup.
  7. Pour the butter and plant material into the cheesecloth strainer, and let the mixture flow into the measuring cup below. Avoid squeezing the cheesecloth for excess butter, to avoid undesirable plant material from sifting through.
  8. Pour the measuring cup of infused butter into your desired storage container or jar. Refrigerate or freeze the butter, which will stay good for 2 months in the fridge and up to 6 mon

How To Make THC Honey?

how to make thc honey

Now that you know how to make THC butter, the process to make other infused oils or liquids is that much easier. You’ll again decarboxylate your cannabis flower with the same method used for butter. Using the same ratio of 3.5 g to 1 cup of honey, as well. Once your weed is activated through decarboxylation, follow the simple steps below to infuse your honey.

  1. In a double boiler, heat your honey over low heat.
  2. Once heated, add your decarboxylated cannabis flower and mix thoroughly.
  3. Allow the mixture to continue simmering on gentle heat for approximately 40 minutes, stirring often.
  4. Place a cheesecloth over a mesh strainer, and put over a measuring cup or directly over a funnel and jar that you plan to store your infused honey in.
  5. Pour the honey and cannabis flower mixture into the cheesecloth and strainer, and let it freely drain into the jar or measuring cup. Avoid squeezing the cheesecloth to keep unwanted or bad-tasting material out of the honey.
  6. Store your infused honey in a cool and dark space, for 1-2 months.

How To Make THC Syrup?

how to make thc syrup

THC simple syrup is a versatile infusion that can be added to a number of recipes, or drinks. Most commonly it’s added to coffees, teas, or cocktails. It can also be used to sweeten up any recipe or meal, by blending it with common sauces or using it as a drizzle or topping. Some consumers even take the THC syrup sublingually, or like a shot, similar to cough medicine syrups you may be used to.

With this method, you’ll again start with decarboxylating the cannabis flower you’ll plan on infusing into the sugary-sweet liquid. When your buds are ready for infusion, you’ll follow the steps below to make your THC syrup.

  1. Combine equal quantities of water and sugar in a saucepan.
  2. Bring the mixture to a boil to allow the sugar to dissolve completely into the water.
  3. Reduce heat to a medium-low setting, and add your decarboxylated cannabis flower.

How To Make THC Gummies

how to make thc gummies

THC gummies are one of the most popular edible choices. They have a somewhat long shelf-life, are delicious to consume and are relatively simple to make. When learning how to make THC gummies, you’ll come across many different methods that all produce the same result. So, if you’ve set out to learn how to make THC gummy bears, we have the recipe for you. We found the recipe below, to be the most simple and successful.

This technique uses a cannabis tincture or oil, which can also be substituted with infused coconut oil. To infuse coconut oil, you’ll follow the same recipe for ‘cannabutter’ that we’ve already reviewed but with coconut oil versus butter.

One special item you’ll need to buy to make THC gummies are silicone molds in classic gummy bear shapes, or whatever shape you choose.

How To Make THC Infused Gummies

Ingredients:

  • 1 large (6oz) packet of Jell-o (sugar free is acceptable)
  • 4 envelopes of gelatin
  • ½ cup of cold water (can substitute with juice or flavored water for additional flavor)
  • 4 tablespoons of cannabis tincture/oil (up to ½ cup of infused coconut oil for additional potency)
  1. Spray your silicone molds lightly with oil. Remove any excess oil with a paper towel.
  2. In a saucepan, whisk together the packet of jell-o with the 4 packets of gelatin.
  3. Add your ½ cup of water and cannabis infused oil or tincture.
  4. Bring the mixture up to a light boil, then immediately drop to low while stirring constantly.
  5. Let the mixture simmer for approximately 5 minutes, until you see all liquids consistently blended.
  6. Pour the mixture into a measuring cup, for dispersing into individual molds.
  7. Refrigerate the gummy molds for 15-20 minutes to solidify.
  8. Pop out of the molds, to store and enjoy! Store gummies in the fridge for up to 1 month.

How To Make THC Candy

how to make THC candy

THC candy is easy to consume, and convenient for on-the-go use. It’s a sweet treat that will help get you through the day, when using THC for anxiety or THC for pain. Here is a quick and easy recipe to follow, to make your own THC candy.

Ingredients & materials:

  • 2-3 tablespoons of THC cannabis tincture or oil
  • 2 cups sugar
  • ⅔ cup corn syrup
  • ½ cup of water
  • ½ teaspoon of flavor/extract (optional, add to taste)
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • Candy molds and lollipop sticks (optional)
  • Candy thermometer
  1. In a saucepan combine the sugar, corn syrup and water.
  2. Bring to a boil and continue stirring until the temperature reaches 250℉.
  3. Stop stirring the mixture once it’s reached 250℉ and let it rise until 305℉. This occurs very quickly, so keep your eye on the thermometer.
  4. Once the mixture has reached 305, remove from heat, and add your cannabis tincture, optional extract and food coloring.
  5. Stir completely, and pour into the candy molds. If making lollipops, add your sticks just prior to the candy hardening.
  6. Once the candies have hardened, remove from molds and enjoy!

How To Make THC Brownies And THC Cookies

cookies thc edibles

Like we’ve already mentioned, once you’ve made your THC butter, THC honey, or other liquid base…you can quite literally add or use the infusion in any other recipe. Including baked goods, like THC brownies and THC cookies. So learning how to make THC cookies is quite easy. Find your favorite cookie or brownie recipe, and substitute its normal amount of oil or butter, with your canna-infused version. If you’d like to lessen the strength of your edibles per serving, you can use just ½ or ¼ of your cannabase to the un-infused version. For example, if cookies call for 1 cup of butter, you can use ½ cup of THC butter and ½ cup of regular butter.

How To Make THC Tea

how to make thc tea

If you’ve already made THC butter, THC coconut oil, or THC syrup, making a THC tea is simple from there. Simply melt or add the THC infused bases into the hot water you’ll be using to prepare your tea. But there’s also a method where you can infuse tea with THC from ground cannabis flower or even trim, leaves and stems. The simple process is outlined below –

  1. Use a mortar and pestle, or something similar, to grind up at least 1 gram of cannabis flower.
  2. Add ½ teaspoon of butter to the flower, to act as a soluble fat for absorption sake.
  3. Put the butter and cannabis mixture into an empty tea bag or tea infuser.
  4. Boil water, and then simmer on medium-high heat. Place the filled tea bag or infuser into the water. Let it simmer for up to 30 minutes.
  5. Remove the pot from the stove and pour into a cup. Flavor with milk or sugar, as you would with any other cup of tea. Or, add in a flavored tea bag to steep for an extra infusion of flavor into your cup of THC tea.

How Much THC In Edibles?

To avoid over-consuming you’ll want to know how much THC is in your homemade edibles. The calculation or dose will not only depend on the type of flower or oil you used, but also the amount. While you can find a number of ‘edible calculators’ on the internet, the formula to do so yourself is just as simple.

How To Calculate THC In Edibles?

To calculate THC amounts in edibles, we’ll assume that the cannabis flower used contains 10% THC to simplify the method. If you know the percentage of THC in your strain, or use our THC percentage chart, you can adjust the following formula accordingly –

  • 1 gram of cannabis = 1000 mg
  • X 10% THC = 100 mg
  • 1 gram of cannabis = 100 mg THC

Now, you’ll figure out the total amount per the number of grams you used in your butter or oil base. Because 3.5 grams is the standard amount of cannabis flower to oil, we’ll use this as an example.

100 mg THC x 3.5 g cannabis = 350 mg THC in 1 cup of butter or oil

Lastly, to figure out your ‘per dose’ mg amount just divide the total amount of butter or oil that was used in the recipe. So, if you used 1 cup of butter or oil with 350 mg to make a batch of 15 cookies, each cookie contains approximately 23 mg of THC. If you only used ½ cup of the butter, you’ll divide 350 by ½ first, equaling 175 mg. Then 175 mg divided by the total amount of pieces the recipe makes.

How Long Does THC Edibles Stay In Your System?

One final question that people ask themselves when making or consuming THC edibles is…how long does THC edibles stay in the body? Depending on dosage, you’re liking to feel the effects of THC for a duration of 4-8 hours. As for how long does THC stays in your system, with any consumption method you can follow the guide below –

  • Blood: Up to 4 hours
  • Urine: Up to 30 days
  • Saliva: Up to 72 hours
  • Hair: Up to 90 days

Source: https://www.hailmaryjane.com/how-to-make-thc-edibles/

Cannabis

The Economic Impact of Cannabis | Cannabiz Media

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Research and economic data collected in recent years shows that the cannabis industry positively affects the economies in states and municipalities by creating more jobs, increasing real estate values, and generating tax revenue that is used for a wide variety of purposes. 

Employment Benefits from the Cannabis Industry

With the opening of cultivation facilities, manufacturing facilities, dispensaries, and retail stores to support the legal cannabis industry, jobs are created. In addition to jobs that are directly involved with the marijuana supply chain, there are hundreds of ancillary jobs needed to keep the industry going. These include accountants, lawyers, and many more.

It is estimated that the legal cannabis industry employed 321,000 full-time workers across the 37 states in the United States with operational medical and/or cannabis programs as of January 2021. Of those full-time jobs, 24% (77,000) were added during 2020 showing a significant growth trend as more states launch and expand cannabis programs.

When you add in the estimated eight to 10 ancillary businesses that are thought to support every one licensed cannabis company, the employment numbers skyrocket. Based on this data and future predictions, it’s clear that regulated cannabis markets benefit states’ economies by creating thousands or tens of thousands of new jobs.

Real Estate Benefits from the Cannabis Industry

States that have legalized medical and/or recreational cannabis are seeing a significant increase in property values and lease rates where licensed cultivators, manufacturers, dispensaries, and retailers can operate. 

Due to strict zoning laws in many areas, marijuana businesses have a limited supply of properties to choose from to build their facilities. Property owners understand this and face their own risks when they rent to cannabis-related businesses. As a result, lease rates and property values skyrocket.

It’s not just commercial property and land values that benefit from the marijuana industry. A study of Colorado municipalities published in January 2018 found that housing values increased by 6% with cannabis legalization.

Tax Benefits from the Cannabis Industry

One of the easiest ways to track the economic benefit of the legal cannabis industry to states and local municipalities is through tax revenue, particularly in states that have legalized both recreational and medical cannabis since adult-use taxes are typically much higher than medical taxes. In fact, some states don’t tax medical cannabis at all, but it’s not unusual for adult-use cannabis to be taxed multiple times (excise tax, state sales tax, and local tax) and at rates as high as 15%, 17%, or even 37%.

How much do all of these taxes bring in for states? According to Motley Fool, California brought in $1,031,879,926 in tax revenue in 2020 – the most of any state. In Washington State, tax revenue in 2020 reached $469,200,000, and in Colorado, 2020 tax revenue was $387,480,110. 

Taxes collected by states and local municipalities are used for a variety of purposes – from funding community programs, education, and law enforcement to paying for the costs to run the state or town’s cannabis program.

The Cannabis Industry Provides a Positive Economic Impact

When a state allows the sale of medical and/or recreational cannabis, its economy benefits. That’s the conclusion numerous researchers have made after analyzing a number of economic factors over the past several years. Specifically, employment rates, real estate values, and tax revenue all increase with the approval of medical and adult-use cannabis.

MJBizDaily reported economic data in its 2021 Annual Cannabis Business Factbook that puts the economic impact of a legal cannabis market into perspective. Consider these facts:

  • Total U.S. economic impact from cannabis sales in 2021 is expected to reach $92 billion (up more than 30% from 2020).
  • Total U.S. economic impact from cannabis sales will increase to upwards of $160 billion in 2025.
  • For every $1 consumers and patients spend at retail locations, an additional $2.50 will be injected into the economy – much of it at the local level.
  • California’s legal cannabis industry is expected to add nearly to $20 billion to the state’s economy in 2021.
  • Legal cannabis markets in Colorado, Illinois, Oregon, and Washington will each add more than $10 billion to their local economies in the coming years.
  • Nevada’s economic impact per person from the legal cannabis industry will be approximately $1,917 in 2021.
  • Legal cannabis markets in Alaska, Colorado, and Oregon will each deliver approximately $1,500 per person into their economies this year.
  • California will deliver an estimated economic impact per person of $500 in 2021.

Bottom-line, the data shows that the cannabis industry has a positive economic impact on states and communities, and that impact hasn’t peaked yet.

Originally published 11/13/18. Updated 9/24/21.

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Source: https://www.cannabiz.media/blog/the-economic-impact-of-marijuana

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CBD (Cannabidiol) Explained – The Real Benefits of this Trendy Cannabinoid

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While a fringe, alternative treatment option only a decade ago, today, CBD is everywhere you look – in wellness supplements, beauty and hygiene products, FDA-approved prescription medications, food and beverages, dental products, and even pillows, mattresses, and other random household goods.

As far as cannabinoids go, CBD, or cannabidiol) is the most widely accepted. Not only is there a growing body of clinical research to support its benefits, but it is non-intoxicating which makes it much more likely for laws to be passed in its favor – as is evidenced by the fact that CBD is federally legal in the US and many other countries, while THC still is not. But when it comes to CBD, what are some actual legitimate uses for this compound, and which ones are just marketing gimmicks? Let’s take a look at some of the real, science-backed benefits of CBD.

CBD is amazing, and so incredibly versatile. To learn more about this compound, and for exclusive deals on CBD flowers, as well as on Delta 8Delta 10 THCTHCVTHC-OTHCPHHC and even on legal Delta-9 THC! , make sure to subscribe to The CBD Flowers Weekly Newsletter, your hub for all things CBD-related.


What is CBD?

CBD, or cannabidiol, is the most prominent, non-intoxicating compound found in cannabis plants. When most people think of cannabis, they’re thinking about marijuana, which is the type so cannabis that is high in THC and associated with feelings of being “stoned”. Some types of cannabis, hemp for example, are high in CBD and contain only trace amounts of THC, meaning these plants can be considered non-intoxicating, by all accounts.

CBD is gaining popularity as a safe, non-toxic, non-addictive, natural treatment option for many different chronic and debilitating ailments; both mental and physical. Not only is CBD itself non-psychoactive, but when taken in combination with compounds that are, like tetrahydrocannabinol for instance, CBD can minimize the likelihood of negative side effects such as paranoia and anxiety that are occasionally associated with THC use.

The reason CBD (or any cannabinoid for that matter) works in the human body at all is because of the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) – a complex signaling system made up of numerous receptors, as well as some naturally produced endocannabinoids, that exists in the bodies of nearly all animals (except insects). Researchers have discovered two different endocannabinoids so far, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA), plus the two most studied receptors, CB1 and CB2. This quad makes up the majority of existing cannabis research.

As a whole, the ECS regulates numerous different functions and processes in our bodies and maintains internal balance and homeostasis. Many cannabinoids engage directly with the ECS receptors. Others, like CBD, have indirect connections by activating other receptors that will then interact with the endocannabinoid system. Specifically, CBD activates the TRVP1 receptors, which in turn activate receptors in the ECS and also function as ion channels.

CBD as an Anti-Inflammatory

One of the most common uses for CBD is to treat inflammation, which is the body’s process of fighting against pathogens and other hazards, such as infections, injuries, and toxins. When something damages your cells, your body releases chemicals that trigger a response from your immune system, thus causing inflammation.

The phrase “too much of a good thing” really applies in the case of inflammation. When this inflammatory response lingers after your body is done fighting the infection or whatever it is trying to overcome, this leaves your body in a constant state of stress and unrest. Chronic inflammation can have devastating effects on the tissues and organs and research indicates that it’s the root cause of many ailments including arthritis, contact dermatitis, acne, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes, asthma, and cancer.

Cannabidiol is becoming a very popular alternative for standard NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) drugs like Aspirin. Long-term use of NSAIDs can lead to various health problems such as heartburn, stomach pain, ulcers, headaches, dizziness, and even damage to the liver and kidneys.

CBD to Manage Anxiety

Anxiety is another condition that’s been researched extensively to determine how well it responds to cannabis therapies. Cannabidiol targets cell receptors in the body and brain that regulate your mood. Many mood disorders, including anxiety and depression, have a few things in common, including a lack of naturally produced endocannabinoids.

Treating mood disorders with CBD is becoming more widespread is among the top-rated treatment options for young adults ages 25-40. According to a study conducted a couple of years ago, thirty-four percent of millennials prefer to manage their mental health with natural and holistic remedies, and 50 percent of millennials believe CBD oil is the best way to do this; and this number continues to grow.

The main reason cited was a fear of being prescribed a medication that is too potent for their level of symptoms. Because CBD doesn’t have the mind-numbing and other unwanted side effects of prescription drugs, nor is it psychoactive like THC, it can be used all day like any other medication or supplement.

CBD for Controlling Seizures

One of the first, medically-accepted, modern-day uses for CBD was to treat epilepsy. There are many studies out there researching its effectiveness. As a matter of fact, there is even an FDA-approved, cannabidiol-based medication, Epidiolex, that’s used to treat two rare and severe forms of childhood epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) and Dravet Syndrome (DS).

Epidiolex is currently being prescribed in the United States, many countries in Europe, and Japan. Epilepsy medications can have some very serious side effects, and that’s why more natural alternatives are becoming the go-to ­­way to treat children and younger adult patients who suffer from epilepsy.

CBD for Pain Management

Although not common, many patients turn to a CAM, or complementary alternative medicine approach, to manage chronic pain. CBD is at the top of the list for those looking for natural, yet effective, alternative remedies. Because inflammation is the root cause of so many conditions that cause chronic pain, it makes sense how CBD eliminates pain.

Numerous different studies have found that cannabinoids like CBD can help with chronic pain from multiple sclerosis, cancer, and neuropathy. CBD and CBD topicals help with pain — if you suffer from chronic pain, CBD oil may help, as well. Chronic pain can be the main source of a diminished quality of life — CBD may give you hope for getting pain-free, or at the very least, reduced pain, and anything is worth a try.

CBD for Skin Conditions

Studies have shown that CBD can provide relief for the symptoms of various skin disorders, such as eczema and allergic reactions. Reverting back to ​inflammation, we know that cannabidiol can be used internally inflammatory conditions, and now we also know that it does the same when applied topically.

Topical creams containing CBD have been shown to ​or greatly reduce and sometimes even completely eliminate itching and dryness​ ​in sufferers of eczema. The chemical ‘histamine’, which is largely responsible for the irritating itches we experience, has been shown to react well to topical cannabinoid therapy. One study​ ​found that in almost 59% of its participants, their dry and scaly skin significantly reduced with the regular use of a cannabinoid cream, which reduced itching and as a result lead to less sleep loss.

Final Thoughts on Cannabidiol Benefits

Simply put, cannabidiol is an incredible compound. It’s non-psychoactive, non-toxic, and non-addictive; and it can be used to treat dozens of different health conditions. The ones covered in this list are the most common uses for CBD, but it can be utilized for many other ailments as well. Do you use CBD? And if so, what do you use it for? Drop us a line in the comment section below!

Thank you for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things cannabis-related. To learn more about weed, and for exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, edibles, topicals, and other products, make sure to subscribe to The CBD Flowers Weekly Newsletter.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/23/cbd-cannabidiol-explained-the-real-benefits-of-this-trendy-cannabinoid/

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Cannabis

CBD (Cannabidiol) Explained – The Real Benefits of this Trendy Cannabinoid

Published

on

While a fringe, alternative treatment option only a decade ago, today, CBD is everywhere you look – in wellness supplements, beauty and hygiene products, FDA-approved prescription medications, food and beverages, dental products, and even pillows, mattresses, and other random household goods.

As far as cannabinoids go, CBD, or cannabidiol) is the most widely accepted. Not only is there a growing body of clinical research to support its benefits, but it is non-intoxicating which makes it much more likely for laws to be passed in its favor – as is evidenced by the fact that CBD is federally legal in the US and many other countries, while THC still is not. But when it comes to CBD, what are some actual legitimate uses for this compound, and which ones are just marketing gimmicks? Let’s take a look at some of the real, science-backed benefits of CBD.

CBD is amazing, and so incredibly versatile. To learn more about this compound, and for exclusive deals on CBD flowers, as well as on Delta 8Delta 10 THCTHCVTHC-OTHCPHHC and even on legal Delta-9 THC! , make sure to subscribe to The CBD Flowers Weekly Newsletter, your hub for all things CBD-related.


What is CBD?

CBD, or cannabidiol, is the most prominent, non-intoxicating compound found in cannabis plants. When most people think of cannabis, they’re thinking about marijuana, which is the type so cannabis that is high in THC and associated with feelings of being “stoned”. Some types of cannabis, hemp for example, are high in CBD and contain only trace amounts of THC, meaning these plants can be considered non-intoxicating, by all accounts.

CBD is gaining popularity as a safe, non-toxic, non-addictive, natural treatment option for many different chronic and debilitating ailments; both mental and physical. Not only is CBD itself non-psychoactive, but when taken in combination with compounds that are, like tetrahydrocannabinol for instance, CBD can minimize the likelihood of negative side effects such as paranoia and anxiety that are occasionally associated with THC use.

The reason CBD (or any cannabinoid for that matter) works in the human body at all is because of the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) – a complex signaling system made up of numerous receptors, as well as some naturally produced endocannabinoids, that exists in the bodies of nearly all animals (except insects). Researchers have discovered two different endocannabinoids so far, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA), plus the two most studied receptors, CB1 and CB2. This quad makes up the majority of existing cannabis research.

As a whole, the ECS regulates numerous different functions and processes in our bodies and maintains internal balance and homeostasis. Many cannabinoids engage directly with the ECS receptors. Others, like CBD, have indirect connections by activating other receptors that will then interact with the endocannabinoid system. Specifically, CBD activates the TRVP1 receptors, which in turn activate receptors in the ECS and also function as ion channels.

CBD as an Anti-Inflammatory

One of the most common uses for CBD is to treat inflammation, which is the body’s process of fighting against pathogens and other hazards, such as infections, injuries, and toxins. When something damages your cells, your body releases chemicals that trigger a response from your immune system, thus causing inflammation.

The phrase “too much of a good thing” really applies in the case of inflammation. When this inflammatory response lingers after your body is done fighting the infection or whatever it is trying to overcome, this leaves your body in a constant state of stress and unrest. Chronic inflammation can have devastating effects on the tissues and organs and research indicates that it’s the root cause of many ailments including arthritis, contact dermatitis, acne, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes, asthma, and cancer.

Cannabidiol is becoming a very popular alternative for standard NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) drugs like Aspirin. Long-term use of NSAIDs can lead to various health problems such as heartburn, stomach pain, ulcers, headaches, dizziness, and even damage to the liver and kidneys.

CBD to Manage Anxiety

Anxiety is another condition that’s been researched extensively to determine how well it responds to cannabis therapies. Cannabidiol targets cell receptors in the body and brain that regulate your mood. Many mood disorders, including anxiety and depression, have a few things in common, including a lack of naturally produced endocannabinoids.

Treating mood disorders with CBD is becoming more widespread is among the top-rated treatment options for young adults ages 25-40. According to a study conducted a couple of years ago, thirty-four percent of millennials prefer to manage their mental health with natural and holistic remedies, and 50 percent of millennials believe CBD oil is the best way to do this; and this number continues to grow.

The main reason cited was a fear of being prescribed a medication that is too potent for their level of symptoms. Because CBD doesn’t have the mind-numbing and other unwanted side effects of prescription drugs, nor is it psychoactive like THC, it can be used all day like any other medication or supplement.

CBD for Controlling Seizures

One of the first, medically-accepted, modern-day uses for CBD was to treat epilepsy. There are many studies out there researching its effectiveness. As a matter of fact, there is even an FDA-approved, cannabidiol-based medication, Epidiolex, that’s used to treat two rare and severe forms of childhood epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) and Dravet Syndrome (DS).

Epidiolex is currently being prescribed in the United States, many countries in Europe, and Japan. Epilepsy medications can have some very serious side effects, and that’s why more natural alternatives are becoming the go-to ­­way to treat children and younger adult patients who suffer from epilepsy.

CBD for Pain Management

Although not common, many patients turn to a CAM, or complementary alternative medicine approach, to manage chronic pain. CBD is at the top of the list for those looking for natural, yet effective, alternative remedies. Because inflammation is the root cause of so many conditions that cause chronic pain, it makes sense how CBD eliminates pain.

Numerous different studies have found that cannabinoids like CBD can help with chronic pain from multiple sclerosis, cancer, and neuropathy. CBD and CBD topicals help with pain — if you suffer from chronic pain, CBD oil may help, as well. Chronic pain can be the main source of a diminished quality of life — CBD may give you hope for getting pain-free, or at the very least, reduced pain, and anything is worth a try.

CBD for Skin Conditions

Studies have shown that CBD can provide relief for the symptoms of various skin disorders, such as eczema and allergic reactions. Reverting back to ​inflammation, we know that cannabidiol can be used internally inflammatory conditions, and now we also know that it does the same when applied topically.

Topical creams containing CBD have been shown to ​or greatly reduce and sometimes even completely eliminate itching and dryness​ ​in sufferers of eczema. The chemical ‘histamine’, which is largely responsible for the irritating itches we experience, has been shown to react well to topical cannabinoid therapy. One study​ ​found that in almost 59% of its participants, their dry and scaly skin significantly reduced with the regular use of a cannabinoid cream, which reduced itching and as a result lead to less sleep loss.

Final Thoughts on Cannabidiol Benefits

Simply put, cannabidiol is an incredible compound. It’s non-psychoactive, non-toxic, and non-addictive; and it can be used to treat dozens of different health conditions. The ones covered in this list are the most common uses for CBD, but it can be utilized for many other ailments as well. Do you use CBD? And if so, what do you use it for? Drop us a line in the comment section below!

Thank you for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things cannabis-related. To learn more about weed, and for exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, edibles, topicals, and other products, make sure to subscribe to The CBD Flowers Weekly Newsletter.

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Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/23/cbd-cannabidiol-explained-the-real-benefits-of-this-trendy-cannabinoid/

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Cannabis

GHB: What is it?

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The world of new drugs and drug fads move quicker than anyone can keep up with. In fact, if you even tried to understand what ‘the kids’ are taking these days, you’d probably end up both confused and intoxicated quite quickly. There used to be a time when cocaine, cannabis and ecstasy was all anyone spoke about. However, nowadays, the world of drugs has opened up excessively. The likes of GHB, M-CAT, ketamine, mushrooms, acid, crystal meth and unlimited others are all being taken around the world.

Each drug has its own story and its own positives and negatives. So what about GHB? Many enjoy this drug, whilst many fear it. I myself have had an encounter with this drug. Let’s delve into what it is. 

GHB is a drug with a very interesting history and reputation, but, like many other mind-altering compounds, it does have a place in both the worlds of the therapeutics and recreation. To learn more about cannabis and psychedelics, make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for more articles like this one, as well as exclusive deals Delta 8Delta 10 THCTHCVTHC-OTHCPHHC and even on legal Delta-9 THC!


What is GHB?

The world of recreational drugs is often separated by two phrases: ‘uppers’ and ‘downers’. Or in more scientific terms, ‘stimulants’ and ‘depressants’. GHB or Gamma Hydroxybutyrate would be in the depressant section. Obviously the differences between the two categories are pretty self-explanatory, based on the names. However, if you want to understand a little more, here’s a brief description from trusty wikipedia

“Depressants are also occasionally referred to as “downers” as they lower the level of arousal when taken. Stimulants or “uppers” increase mental and/or physical function, hence the opposite drug class of depressants is stimulants, not antidepressants”

What Does It Look Like?

GHB most commonly appears as a transparent liquid, not too dissimilar from water. Usually it will be given to the consumer in a bottle, and they will then use the cap or the lid to pour a little in and sip it. It doesn’t really have much of a taste, but can sometimes have a slight salty twang. It can also be given, less commonly, as a white powder or a capsule. GHB is known also as the ‘ghost drug’ because it’s very easy to disguise and to – in some circumstances – use as a ‘date rape’ drug. 

The History of GHB

GHB is a designer drug, which means it was and is created in a lab with the sole purpose to be used recreationally. In the 1990s, during the birth of rave culture, the drug gained popularity for its euphoric and sedative high. GHB is extremely powerful and it doesn’t take much of it to give someone a powerful experience. Furthermore, it can also quite easily make someone black out. This is why, whilst GHB is known in the drug world to be a club drug, which brings joy to many, it’s also considered very dangerous if used by the wrong person. This dichotomy of good and evil has surrounded the drug’s reputation for decades. 

Fun fact: GHB is often used by bodybuilders, as they believe it can help reduce fat and increase muscle. Do you think this should count as a performance enhancing drug?

GBH or GHB?

If you’re in the United Kingdom, often people will hear the term ‘GHB’, and think of the similar abbreviation ‘GBH’. GBH stands for Grievous Bodily Harm, which is a UK definition for a serious crime against someone that causes severe wounds to their body. GBH and GHB may sound similar, and often people will get the two abbreviations mixed up, but actually, they are very very different things. Of course if you’re not based in the then perhaps you haven’t heard of that, but it’s always good to make the distinction early on. 

GHB: How does it make you feel?

As mentioned previously, GHB can have positive and negative effects. This is usually down to the individual’s body, and of course, how much they decide to take. Like any drug, it differs from person to person, circumstance to circumstance. For example, if a smaller person consumed GHB they are much more likely to feel the effects stronger than a larger person. In addition, if you’re in a club and alcohol has already been consumed then, again, the effects will be a heck of a lot more powerful than if you were sober, sitting in a sunny field. Ultimately, the positive effects will arise for those who take less GHB, and the more negative effects come almost always from overdosing. GHB is a very very powerful drug.  

Positive Effects

  • Confidence
  • Sociability 
  • Euphoria
  • Slightly dizzy
  • Lack of inhibitions

Negative Effects

  • Nausea 
  • Sweating 
  • Headaches
  • Vomiting
  • Hallucinations
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Confusion
  • Death

Is GHB Legal?

GHB is illegal in both North America and Europe. In the UK, it has been a class C drug since 2003, which means that it’s technically less illegal than THC cannabis (which is quite remarkable). In the USA, GHB is a Schedule I controlled substance. This means it’s part of the same group as cannabis and heroin. It just goes to show how different American and Britain drug laws are. 

GHB, whilst made in a lab, is technically a chemical found in the brain and other parts of the body. Thus, it is used in certain medical practices – like most drugs are. Some forms of GHB are prescribed to help with narcolepsy, or to help with alcoholism. Like many drugs, GHB has a legal form that is used in medical practices, but it’s recreational form is very much illegal. 

The Date Rape Drug

According to the Office of National Statistics, From 2014-2018, there were 120 deaths in the UK that were caused by GHB. Part of this statistic was due to overdosing, whilst others were also due to it being used as a date rape drug. Due to its intense power, GHB has been cynically and cruelly used by many people (mostly men) to sexually assault another person. Many women and men have been given GHB non-consensually and then fallen unconscious, leading to them being sexually assaulted. A recent award winning BBC Drama I May Destroy You, written by Michaela Coel, portrayed a woman who this had happened to. In fact, Michaela Coel wrote about her own experience. She believed that by portraying her experiences on screen, she could hopefully highlight the dangers of date rape, whilst also repelling men from doing it. If you haven’t watched the show, it’s 100% worth a watch. 

GHB: My Own Experiences

Like many other people, I myself have had mixed experiences with GHB. I like to think of myself as an open person and am willing to try different substances from time to time. Although, to be honest, as I get older, my willingness to try different substances is definitely starting to diminish. However, I travelled to Amsterdam not so long ago with my girlfriend to stay with my father who recently moved there from the UK. We decided to attend a dinner party with some new friends and they spoke about buying some GHB for the evening ahead. I hadn’t heard much about GHB except the ‘date rape’ stuff and, thus, wasn’t too keen on the idea. But I’m aware that drugs can often be surrounded by bad reputations, which may be justified, but aren’t always the case if you’re safe and smart about it.

Therefore, we decided to accept the offer and my girlfriend and I continued the evening knowing that GHB would be on the cards at some point. Eventually, after some drinks, we were taken into a room and given a little lid to sip from. The liquid was transparent and didn’t taste of anything. My initial thought was: ‘is that seriously all I need to get high? That’s nothing’. I then instantly became anxious as I imagined all the people who would have simply taken the bottle and swigged from it without knowing the safe amount to take. As the night went on, I began to feel beautifully euphoric. My girlfriend and I danced, had deep conversations, and genuinely had a great evening. 

It was all going well until I blacked out and woke up on the sofa a few minutes later. It was very confusing. I then sobered up, unsure if it was the GHB or the alcohol that had caused my slight black out. My girlfriend and I decided to leave the party and return home, but just before we left – she decided to take one more sip of the GHB for the journey. This was when both of our experiences with GBH began to turn sour. Within minutes my girlfriend had passed out and would not wake up. In the end I took her to the hospital and it wasn’t until the next morning that she awoke from her deep sleep. She was completely unaware of what had happened. Luckily, she was okay and had been looked after. What had started as a nice experience, had quickly become a very scary one.

What’s Your Opinion?

Like all drugs, everyone has different experiences with them, thus there are varying views out there. The truth is, if people are responsible, safe and aren’t taken advantage of, then the majority of drugs can be enjoyed. However, unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. GHB, more than most drugs, has been known to be abused and utilised in an immoral way. What do you think? What’s your opinion of GHB?

Thank you for stopping by CBD Testers! Your hub for all things cannabis-related. For more articles like this one, and exclusive deals on various products, make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
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Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/23/what-is-ghb/

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