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How the climate crisis will crash the economy

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The chickens are coming home to roost.

Even before the western United States became a regional inferno, even before the Midwest U.S. became a summertime flood zone, even before an annual hurricane season so bad that the government is running out of names to attach to them, even before Colorado saw a 100 degrees Fahrenheit heatwave swan dive into a 12-inch snowstorm within 48 hours.

Even before all that, we’d been watching the real-world risks of climate change looming and growing across the United States and around the world. And the costs, financially and otherwise, are quickly becoming untenable.

Lately, a steady march of searing heat, ruinous floods, horrific wildfires, unbreathable air, devastating hurricanes and other climate-related calamities has been traversing our screens and wreaking havoc to national and local budgets. And we’re only at 1C of increased global temperature rise. Just imagine what 2C or 3C or 4C will look like, and how much it will cost.

We may not have to wait terribly long to find out.

It’s natural to follow the people affected by all this: the local residents, usually in poorer neighborhoods, whose homes and livelihoods are being lost; the farmers and ranchers whose crops and livestock are withering and dying; the stranded travelers and the evacuees seeking shelter amid the chaos. And, of course the heroic responders to all these events, not to mention an entire generation of youth who fear their future is being stolen before their eyes, marching in the streets. So many people and stories.

But lately, I’ve been following the money.

The financial climate, it seems, has been as unforgiving as the atmospheric one. Some of it has been masked by the pandemic and ensuing recession, but for those paying attention, the indicators are hiding in plain sight. And what we’re seeing now are merely the opening acts of what could be a long-running global financial drama. The economic impact on companies is, to date, uncertain and likely incalculable.

The financial climate, it seems, has been as unforgiving as the atmospheric one.

Last week, a subcommittee of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) issued a report addressing climate risks to the U.S. financial system. That it did so is, in itself, remarkable, given the political climes.

But the report didn’t pussyfoot around the issues: “Climate change poses a major risk to the stability of the U.S. financial system and to its ability to sustain the American economy,” it stated, adding:

Climate change is already impacting or is anticipated to impact nearly every facet of the economy, including infrastructure, agriculture, residential and commercial property, as well as human health and labor productivity. Over time, if significant action is not taken to check rising global average temperatures, climate change impacts could impair the productive capacity of the economy and undermine its ability to generate employment, income and opportunity.

Among the “complex risks for the U.S. financial system,” the authors said, are “disorderly price adjustments in various asset classes, with possible spillovers into different parts of the financial system, as well as potential disruption of the proper functioning of financial markets.”

In other words: We’re heading into uncharted economic territory.

Climate change, said the report’s authors, is expected to affect “multiple sectors, geographies and assets in the United States, sometimes simultaneously and within a relatively short timeframe.” Those impacts could “disrupt multiple parts of the financial system simultaneously.” For example: “A sudden revision of market perceptions about climate risk could lead to a disorderly repricing of assets, which could in turn have cascading effects on portfolios and balance sheets and therefore systemic implications for financial stability.”

Sub-systemic shocks

And then there are “sub-systemic” shocks, more localized climate-related impacts that “can undermine the financial health of community banks, agricultural banks or local insurance markets, leaving small businesses, farmers and households without access to critical financial services.” This, said the authors, is particularly damaging in areas that already are underserved by the financial system, which includes low-to-moderate income communities and historically marginalized communities.

As always, those least able to least afford the impacts may get hit the hardest.

This was hardly the first expression of concern about the potentially devastating economic impacts of climate change on companies, markets, nations and the global economy. For example:

  • Two years ago, the Fourth National Climate Assessment noted that continued warming “is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S. economy throughout this century, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts.” It placed the price tag at up to 10.5 percent of GDP by 2100.
  • Last month, scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research said that while previous research suggested that a 1C hotter year reduces economic output by about 1 percent, “the new analysis points to output losses of up to three times that much in warm regions.”
  • Another report last month, by the Environmental Defense Fund, detailed how the financial impacts of fires, tropical storms, floods, droughts and crop freezes have quadrupled since 1980. “Researchers are only now beginning to anticipate the indirect impacts in the form of lower asset values, weakened future economic growth and uncertainty-induced instability in financial markets,” it said.

And if you really want a sleepless night or two, read this story about “The Biblical Flood That Will Drown California,” published recently in Mother Jones magazine. Even if you don’t have a home, business or operations in the Golden State, your suppliers and customers likely do, not to mention the provenance of the food on your dinner plate.

Down to business

The CTFC report did not overlook the role of companies in all this. It noted that “disclosure by corporations of information on material, climate-related financial risks is an essential building block to ensure that climate risks are measured and managed effectively,” enabling enables financial regulators and market participants to better understand climate change’s impacts on financial markets and institutions.

However, it warned, “The existing disclosure regime has not resulted in disclosures of a scope, breadth and quality to be sufficiently useful to market participants and regulators.”

An analysis by the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure found that large companies are increasingly disclosing some climate-related information, but significant variations remain in the information disclosed by each company, making it difficult for investors and others to fully understand exposure and manage climate risks.

The macroeconomic forecasts, however gloomy, likely seem academic inside boardrooms. And while that may be myopic — after all, the nature of the economy could begin to shift dramatically before the current decade is out, roiling customers and markets — it likely has little to do with profits and productivity over the short time frames within which most companies operate. Nonetheless, companies with a slightly longer view already are considering the viability of their products and services in a warming world.

Consider the recommendations of the aforementioned CFTC report, of which there are 20. Among them:

  • “The United States should establish a price on carbon.”
  • “All relevant federal financial regulatory agencies should incorporate climate-related risks into their mandates and develop a strategy for integrating these risks in their work.”
  • “Regulators should require listed companies to disclose Scope 1 and 2 emissions. As reliable transition risk metrics and consistent methodologies for Scope 3 emissions are developed, financial regulators should require their disclosure, to the extent they are material.”
  • The Financial Stability Oversight Council “should incorporate climate-related financial risks into its existing oversight function, including its annual reports and other reporting to Congress.”
  • “Financial supervisors should require bank and nonbank financial firms to address climate-related financial risks through their existing risk management frameworks in a way that is appropriately governed by corporate management.”

None of these things is likely to happen until there’s a new legislature and presidential administration in Washington, D.C., but history has shown that many of these can become de facto regulations if enough private-sector and nongovernmental players can adapt and pressure (or incentivize) companies to adopt and hew to the appropriate frameworks.

Finally, there is collaboration among the leading nongovernmental organizations focusing on sustainability reporting and accountability.

And there’s some news on that front: Last week, five NGOs whose frameworks, standards and platforms guide the majority of sustainability and integrated reporting, announced “a shared vision of what is needed for progress towards comprehensive corporate reporting — and the intent to work together to achieve it.”

CDP, the Climate Disclosure Standards Board, the Global Reporting Initiative, the International Integrated Reporting Council and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board have co-published a shared vision of the elements necessary for more comprehensive corporate reporting, and a joint statement of intent to drive towards this goal. They say they will work collaboratively with one another and with the International Organization of Securities Commissions, the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation, the European Commission and the World Economic Forum’s International Business Council.

Lots of names and acronyms in the above paragraph, but you get the idea: Finally, there is collaboration among the leading nongovernmental organizations focusing on sustainability reporting and accountability. To the extent they manage to harmonize their respective standards and frameworks, and should a future U.S. administration adopt those standards the way previous ones did the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, we could see a rapid scale-up of corporate reporting on these matters.

Increased reporting won’t by itself mitigate the anticipated macroeconomic challenges, but to the extent it puts climate risks on an equal footing with other corporate risks — along with a meaningful price on carbon that will help companies attach dollar signs to those risks — it will help advance a decarbonized economy.

Slowly — much too slowly — but amid an unstable climate and economy we’ll take whatever progress we can get.

I invite you to follow me on Twitter, subscribe to my Monday morning newsletter, GreenBuzz, and listen to GreenBiz 350, my weekly podcast, co-hosted with Heather Clancy.

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Source: https://www.greenbiz.com/article/how-climate-crisis-will-crash-economy

Cleantech

FedEx Hops On Nuro’s Autonomous Bandwagon

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Nuro first tripped my radar with a Dominos commercial showing its cute, non-threatening autonomous delivery robot happily arriving at someone’s door with a steaming hot pizza. I love me a cute robot, and love a cute robot that brings me pizza even more, but I thought that Nuro must have bigger plans, right? Turns out, it does — and they’ve just announced a new partnership with a global leader in logistics: FedEx.

“FedEx has made a long-term commitment to use Nuro’s autonomous bots for last-mile delivery at large scale,” writes Dave Ferguson, Nuro’s co-founder. “It’s difficult to imagine another company more apt to use our technology to better everyday life … on any given day, its (FedEx’s) 600,000 person team handles about 18 million packages with a fleet of 200,000 vehicles. Now, we get to add Nuro’s next-generation autonomous vehicle to their operations.”

The tiny Nuro robots are fully electric, bigger than they look, and make use of some pretty advanced AI to make their way to and from different locations. Here, you can see how suburban Houston looks through the eyes of an autonomous Nuro R2… bot? Nurobot?

Nuro AI vs. Houston, TX

Images courtesy Nuro.

There’s no word yet on how many R2 units (ha!) FedEx is buying or where they’re going to be implemented first. Regardless, that is some slick-looking visualization up there, and I’m impressed. It looks very similar to what Volvo (among others) is doing with LiDar. It’s a slick piece, and there’s a ton going on with multiple cameras, advanced software, and a specially-designed, “pedestrian safe” design. It’s neat stuff, developed in concert with industry leaders at Roush to meet a variety of “last mile” delivery needs.

Check out the Nuro R2 for yourself in the handy-dandy infographic, below, then let us know what you’d think of seeing Nuro’s autonomous robot used as a delivery platform for your favorite local restaurant in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Nuro R2 Infographic

Image courtesy Nuro.

Source | Images:  Nuro, via Medium.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/fedex-hops-on-nuros-autonomous-bandwagon/

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Cleantech

FedEx Hops On Nuro’s Autonomous Bandwagon

Published

on

Nuro first tripped my radar with a Dominos commercial showing its cute, non-threatening autonomous delivery robot happily arriving at someone’s door with a steaming hot pizza. I love me a cute robot, and love a cute robot that brings me pizza even more, but I thought that Nuro must have bigger plans, right? Turns out, it does — and they’ve just announced a new partnership with a global leader in logistics: FedEx.

“FedEx has made a long-term commitment to use Nuro’s autonomous bots for last-mile delivery at large scale,” writes Dave Ferguson, Nuro’s co-founder. “It’s difficult to imagine another company more apt to use our technology to better everyday life … on any given day, its (FedEx’s) 600,000 person team handles about 18 million packages with a fleet of 200,000 vehicles. Now, we get to add Nuro’s next-generation autonomous vehicle to their operations.”

The tiny Nuro robots are fully electric, bigger than they look, and make use of some pretty advanced AI to make their way to and from different locations. Here, you can see how suburban Houston looks through the eyes of an autonomous Nuro R2… bot? Nurobot?

Nuro AI vs. Houston, TX

Images courtesy Nuro.

There’s no word yet on how many R2 units (ha!) FedEx is buying or where they’re going to be implemented first. Regardless, that is some slick-looking visualization up there, and I’m impressed. It looks very similar to what Volvo (among others) is doing with LiDar. It’s a slick piece, and there’s a ton going on with multiple cameras, advanced software, and a specially-designed, “pedestrian safe” design. It’s neat stuff, developed in concert with industry leaders at Roush to meet a variety of “last mile” delivery needs.

Check out the Nuro R2 for yourself in the handy-dandy infographic, below, then let us know what you’d think of seeing Nuro’s autonomous robot used as a delivery platform for your favorite local restaurant in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Nuro R2 Infographic

Image courtesy Nuro.

Source | Images:  Nuro, via Medium.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/fedex-hops-on-nuros-autonomous-bandwagon/

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Cleantech

California Legislative Update

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Originally published on NRDC Expert Blog.
By Victoria Rome 

Many bills are working their way through the California Legislature having survived votes in their house of origin and are now moving to policy committee hearings in the opposite house. We’re about half-way through the 2021 legislative session and the legislature is poised for consequential actions — both on the state budget and across dozens of policy bills. Governor Gavin Newsom’s proposed revisions to the state budget, announced in May, and subsequent actions by the legislative budget committees would deliver unprecedented investments in COVID-19 recovery, public health, climate mitigation, disaster preparedness, racial justice, and community resilience.

NRDC is working to ensure that the final budget and legislative action reflect important advances for all Californians, like utility bill debt relief, affordable and clean transportation options, wildlife and ecosystem protection, energy efficiency improvements, healthy school food, environmental justice, and more.

Gov. Newsom’s revised budget proposal is incredibly promising, proposing billions of dollars for investments in clean energy, climate resilience, zero-emission vehicles, among other proposed expenditures for environmental and health protection. The proposal demonstrates the Governor’s commitment to addressing the climate emergency and taking real action to deal with it.

With the impacts of climate change now felt year round, most acutely by lower-income workers and communities of color, we’d like to see additional, targeted funding directed toward clean transportation with an emphasis on fully funding programs that are delivering the biggest pollution reductions and air quality benefits (including clean trucks, buses, and off-road equipment). We are also encouraging state officials to make zero-emission passenger vehicles accessible to low-income communities and communities of color — building on and fully funding the Charge Ahead California Initiative — established by Senate Bill 1275 in 2014.

California’s residential and commercial buildings are a large source of the state’s greenhouse gas emissions. The Legislature should ensure that funding is available to help people improve the energy efficiency of their homes and work toward transitioning completely from natural gas appliances. These investments will lower utility bills, spur the adoption of clean technologies, reduce housing and solar costs, and support a transition to healthy, zero-emissions homes for all.

Additionally, NRDC’s priorities for the state budget, include:

  • Ensuring sufficient funds for drought mitigation, the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and for the Coastal Commission to address sea level rise.
  • Ensuring that utility customers who struggled to pay their water and power bills during COVID continue to receive services and are relieved of all utility debt.
  • Supporting a just, resilient and healthier food and farming system — including improving access to healthy foods with farm-to-school programs; a tiered “mill assessment” or pesticide fee to support the transition away from toxic pesticides to safer pest management; protections for communities impacted by harmful pesticides; and increased air monitoring and enforcement of pesticide use.
  • Supporting active transportation programs to promote biking and walking, grants to expand affordable housing in infill areas, and support for the state’s successful but oversubscribed Low-Income Weatherization Program.
  • Ensuring greater accountability and oversight of the Department of Toxic Substances Control, making progress in fully replacing lead service lines, and providing funding to address PFAS contamination in drinking water, including expanded monitoring and cleanup.

Moving into the second half of the legislative session, NRDC and our partners aim to pass critical policy bills including:

  • AB 118 (Kamlager) to establish the Community Response Initiative to Strengthen Emergency Systems Act, or CRISES Act grant pilot program to allow for alternative approaches to emergency response.
  • AB 416 (Kalra) California Deforestation-Free Procurement Act to ensure the state’s procurement contracts protect boreal and tropical forests and fundamental Indigenous rights. The destruction of tropical and boreal forests is increasing greenhouse gas emissions, threatening wildlife, and infringing on Indigenous community rights while decreasing carbon storage capability.*
  • AB 525 (Chiu, Cunningham, Friedman) to advance responsibly developed offshore wind. The bill, coupled with the recent announcement from the Newsom administration and the Interior Department will jump start California’s process for offshore wind as part of the state’s clean electricity mix.
  • AB 794 (Carrillo) to ensure that state funding for the purchase of clean vehicles will create high-road, high-quality domestic jobs for disadvantaged workers in the manufacturing and trucking industries.
  • AB 962 (Kamlager) to allow for returnable and refillable bottles to flow through the state’s Beverage Container Recycling Program so that they can be washed and refilled.
  • AB 1200 (Ting) Safer Food Packaging and Cookware Act would protect our food, health, and environment by banning the use of toxic “forever” PFAS chemicals in paper-based food packaging and require disclosure of chemicals like PFAS and bisphenols in cookware.*
  • AB 1276 (Carrillo and L. Gonzalez) expands upon the state’s straws upon request law to include other single-use food accessories such as utensils and condiment packets.
  • AB 1395 (Muratsuchi and C. Garcia) to establish in law the state’s goal to reach carbon neutrality by 2045.
  • AB 1401 (Friedman) to eliminate parking requirements for homes and commercial buildings near transit.
  • SB 222 (Dodd) to establish a framework for a statewide water and wastewater affordability assistance program, like programs in place for low-income electricity and telecommunications customers.
  • SB 343 (Allen) prohibits the use of the chasing arrows symbol on plastic products unless they are truly recyclable. SB 343 would help consumers make informed choices about the products and packaging they buy.
  • SB 596 (Becker) requires the State Air Resources Board to develop a comprehensive strategy to reduce the carbon intensity from cement use by 40 percent from 2019 levels by 2030 and to achieve carbon neutrality in this sector no later than 2045.*
  • SB 796 (Bradford) to allow the County of Los Angeles to return land in Manhattan Beach, known as Bruce’s Beach, to the living descendants of the owners from whom that land was wrongfully taken in the 1920s simply because of their race.

Other key bills are on hold for this year, but can be revisited next year, including AB 1087 (Chiu), the Environmental Justice Community Resilience Hubs Program, which would fund upgrades to critical facilities that environmental justice communities depend on for vital support services; SB 502 (Allen) to improve and modernize the Safer Consumer Products Program; SB 342 to add environmental justice representation to the South Coast Air Quality Management District; and SB 449 (Stern), which would require financial institutions and insurers to assess and report climate-associated financial risks.

See here for a full list of the bills that NRDC supports or opposes.

As California emerges from the pandemic and looks toward a return to normalcy, the climate crisis, and its effects; drought, wildfires, and heatwaves continue to pressure us to act. But Governor Newsom and the California Legislature, working together with stakeholders over the next several months, can better position our state to tackle climate change and build up resilience and equity in our communities.

* NRDC is a sponsor or co-sponsor of this bill


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/california-legislative-update/

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Cleantech

New Tesla Model S Plaid Gets AAA Gaming Experience Thanks To New AMD RDNA 2 GPU

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Originally posted on Tesla Oracle & EVANNEX

One of the coolest things about the new Tesla Model S Plaid is its immensely powerful processing that can run AAA games like Cyberpunk 2077 in 60 fps. This gives a car, for the first time ever, PS5-level gaming capability. How is this possible? It turns out that there were some early clues (and salient details) provided a few weeks ago at Computex 2021.

At Computex 2021, AMD CEO Lisa Su revealed that the gaming capability in the new Tesla Model S and Model X will be powered by the AMD RDNA 2-based graphics processing unit (GPU). The supplier of the GPU behind the new Tesla Model S/X 10 teraflops of gaming power was unknown until AMD’s announcement.

According to the AMD CEO, there are two AMD processors in the new Model S and Model X cars. The AMD Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) runs the normal operations of Tesla’s Media Control Unit (MCU / infotainment system) — like maps, vehicle display renderings, camera displays, music, and other basic touchscreen functions.

As soon as the user starts gaming, the AMD RDNA 2 GPU kicks in to smoothly render next-gen games like the Witcher III Wild Hunt that Tesla has featured prominently in prior promotions.

Xbox X|S and Playstation 5 are also powered by the AMD RDNA 2 GPU architecture — this makes next-gen Tesla in-car entertainment on par with the latest gaming consoles. Such a radical shift for in-car entertainment was (quite likely) not anticipated by traditional automakers. This could serve as another distinct edge for Tesla moving forward.

According to the AMD RDNA 2 official webpage, “AMD RDNA 2 architecture is the foundation for next-generation PC gaming graphics, the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series S and X consoles. The groundbreaking RDNA architecture was first introduced at E3 2019, and since then has continuously evolved to spearhead the next generation of high-performance gaming. It’s the DNA that powers your games, the DNA that brings your games to life, the DNA that keeps evolving.”

At Computex 2021, AMD CEO Lisu Su revealed, “You might be surprised to learn the next place you’ll find RDNA 2 graphics. It’s actually on the road, in the electric vehicle market, [inside] the new Tesla Model S and Model X. So we have an embedded Ryzen APU powering the infotainment system of both cars, as well as a discreet RDNA 2-based GPU that kicks in when running AAA games, providing up to 10 teraflops of computing power.”

“We’re thrilled to be working with Tesla to bring the power of Ryzen and Radeon to their newest flagship cars and looking forward to giving gamers a great new platform for AAA gaming,” the AMD CEO said. I’m sure those who just took delivery of the first Model S Plaid vehicles will agree.

Top Video: AMD RDNA™ 2 Architecture (YouTube: AMD). Bottom Video: Presentation by AMD CEO Lisa Su at Computex 2021 (reveals Tesla GPU at 11:22 in the video) (YouTube: AMD).


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/inside-the-amd-rdna-2-gpu-that-allows-new-tesla-model-s-plaid-to-have-aaa-gaming-experience/

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