Connect with us

Aerospace

GE receives airworthiness qualification for first 3D-printed engine part

Published

on

GE receives airworthiness qualification for first 3D-printed engine part

GE Aviation says it has received Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) approval from the US Air Force (USAF) for an F110 additively manufactured sump cover.

The latest milestone in the USAF and GE’s pathfinder Pacer Edge programme, this F110 component is the first engine component designed for and produced by metal additive manufacturing to be qualified by any US Department of Defense entity.

“Much like the GE90 T25 sensor that was an FAA certification pathfinder for metal additive manufacturing for GE Aviation in commercial aerospace, the F110 sump cover sets a solid foundation for many more additively manufactured component qualifications with GE’s military customers,” said Matt Szolwinski, chief engineer and leader of GE’s Large Military Engineering team.

“The Pacer Edge programme is an important initiative for reducing risk and showcasing the application of additive manufacturing in aerospace. The ability to additively manufacture an aircraft engine part and gain military airworthiness is a significant step forward in growing the adoption of additive manufacturing in the Air Force,” said Nathan Parker, deputy programme executive officer for the USAF RSO.

“The Chief of Staff of the Air Force, General Charles Q. Brown, Jr., has challenged us to ‘accelerate change or lose.’ The entire Pacer Edge process is built around the ‘accelerate change’ philosophy, and the speed of the F110 sump cover development and airworthiness approval is evidence of that. The capability that Pacer Edge is demonstrating and proving will be a game changer to engine production and sustainment and will resolve many future Air Force readiness challenges,” said John Sneden, director of the USAF’s Directorate of Propulsion.

GE Aviation F110 engine

The airworthiness qualification of the sump cover brings Pacer Edge Phase 1a of the pathfinder to its conclusion. Part of the key to the accelerated qualification – n under a year – was GE’s decade of metal additive engineering and manufacturing expertise.

The team’s in-depth knowledge of commercial aerospace engine airworthiness for flightworthy 3D printed metal parts is proving instrumental in helping USAF establish its own robust process validation and certification processes for military airworthiness.

Close collaboration and knowledge sharing have enhanced USAF’s spiral development approach of continuously identifying, reverse engineering and developing technical data packages (TDPs) for increasingly complex and larger parts suitable for metal additive manufacturing.

“USAF’s strong vision for additive as part of its wider sustainment and readiness strategy has allowed our combined team to progress at speed. We continue to share our learnings and have developed an efficient, structured way of working — especially for developing qualification processes and expediting design iterations. This lean, operational efficiency is already driving results and now sets us up for the next phases of the programme, including looking at complex and large format, load-carrying structures,” said Szolwinski.

Phase 1b is already underway and focuses on an out-of-production sump cover housing on the TF34 engine, which has been in service more than 40 years.

“We’re thrilled to be on this journey with USAF. Additive journeys are great, but even better when you have a good map and experienced guides. We started with a relatively easy part, but the spiral development model is coming into its own. It provides focus for the team and our experts help navigate and problem solve along the way,” said Lisa Coroa-Bockley, general manager for GE’s Advanced Materials Solutions.

A digital thread also runs through the pathfinder. GE experts focused on digital twinning, maintenance-based predictive analytics and part lifecycle management expertise have been able to complement the USAF’s digital engineering strategy and in-house knowledge.

“Human interaction and collaboration both add immense value to our work, but digital is the enabler. Additive is a powerful digital technology that spans the entire process, from design and modelling, to in-situ monitoring through to inspection and final level assurances,” added Coroa-Bockley. “Adding digital twinning and predictive analytics on top brings new horizons into view, such as systems management, diagnostics and repair of in-field systems.”

“Subsequent phases of the Pacer Edge programme involves the establishment of a metal additive manufacturing supply chain at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma, capable of producing airworthy components in support of the DoD’s sustainment needs,” said Lauren Tubesing, director – military accounts at GE Additive.

Recently, the Air Force’s Propulsion Directorate and RSO invested $10 million to fund additional phases of the Pacer Edge programme, leveraging the Defense Logistics Agency’s (DLA) Captains of Industry contract vehicle.

This funding will accelerate the development of the USAF’s organic AM capability and capacity to design and print flightworthy hardware for military engines, aircraft and support equipment. The Pacer Edge team is utilising this capability to alleviate hard-to-source and obsolete spare parts constraints for legacy systems.

“The F110 sump cover was a terrific pathfinder, allowing us to exercise the USAF’s airworthiness process. There are numerous parts in queue that are ideal candidates for metal 3D printing. Next, we are focused on refining the airworthiness process, so it is as responsive as the technology,” said Melanie Jonason, chief engineer for the USAF’s Propulsion Sustainment Division.

www.ge.com

Tags

Share This Article

Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter

Related Articles

Most recent Articles

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.aero-mag.com/ge-receives-airworthiness-qualification-for-first-3d-printed-engine-part/

Aerospace

Photos: Surplus missile motor from 1960s launches classified NRO satellites

Published

on

A Cold War-era missile motor cast with solid propellant in 1966 fired up for the first time Wednesday to catapult a Northrop Grumman Minotaur 1 rocket off a launch pad in Virginia with three small spacecraft for the U.S. government’s spy satellite agency.

The Minotaur 1 rocket uses two surplus stages taken from the U.S. Air Force’s stockpiles of Minuteman 2 ballistic missiles. Northrop Grumman adds avionics, a payload compartment, and two solid-fueled upper stages to convert the missile parts into a satellite launcher.

The 69-foot-tall (21-meter) rocket took off from pad 0B at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport in Virginia at 9:35 a.m. EDT (1335 GMT) Wednesday, June 15. The rocket’s solid-fueled first stage quickly ramped up to full power, producing more than 200,000 pounds of thrust to accelerate the Minotaur 1 past the speed of sound in less than 30 seconds.

Heading southeast over the Atlantic Ocean, the Minotaur 1 rocket fired three more solid motors to inject three classified satellites into orbit for the National Reconnaissance Office.

These photos show the Minotaur 1 blasting off from the spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. The yellow material peeling off the rocket at liftoff, sometimes called the “banana,” is a thermal cover designed to regulate temperatures for the Minuteman-heritage solid rocket motors.

Read our full story for more details on the mission.

Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Alex Polimeni / Spaceflight Now

Email the author.

Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/20/photos-surplus-missile-motor-from-1960s-launches-classified-nro-satellites/

Continue Reading

Aerospace

Mars smallsat mission gets second chance with Rocket Lab

Published

on

WASHINGTON — A NASA-funded smallsat mission to Mars that lost its ride last year may get new life through a partnership with Rocket Lab.

Rocket Lab announced June 15 it won a contract from the Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL) of the University of California Berkeley to begin design work on a new version of the Escape and Plasma Acceleration and Dynamics Explorers (EscaPADE) mission to Mars. The two EscaPADE spacecraft will go into orbit around Mars to study the interaction of the solar wind with the planet’s atmosphere.

EscaPADE was one of three missions selected by NASA in 2019 as part of its Small Innovative Missions for Planetary Exploration (SIMPLEx) program of smallsat planetary missions. The original plan for EscaPADE was to launch as a secondary payload on the Psyche mission to the main-belt asteroid of the same name in 2022. EscaPADE would have been dropped off when Psyche made a flyby of Mars on its way to the asteroid.

However, a switch in launch vehicles for Psyche, from SpaceX’s Falcon 9 to Falcon Heavy, changed the trajectory parameters of the mission. At a preliminary design review for EscaPADE in August 2020, the agency determined that change made it “no longer viable to manifest EscaPADE as part of the Psyche mission.”

NASA delayed a review of EscaPADE, known as Key Decision Point C, to the middle of this year as it looked for a new ride. Earlier this year, there were rumors in the planetary science community that Rocket Lab would be involved in some way in a revised EscaPADE mission. Agency officials said at recent meetings that a review of EscaPADE was scheduled for this summer but offered few other updates about the mission.

The announcement suggests a broader overhaul for the mission than just a change in launch services. The EscaPADE spacecraft were originally described as spacecraft 60 by 70 by 90 centimeters in size, weighing no more than 90 kilograms each.

According to the Rocket Lab announcement, the EscaPADE spacecraft, named Blue and Gold, will be based on Rocket Lab’s Photon satellite bus. The Curie engine, used on Photon and the kick stage for its Electron rocket, will insert the spacecraft into orbit around Mars.

“This is a hugely promising mission that will deliver big science in a small package,” Peter Beck, chief executive of Rocket Lab, said in a statement. “Our Photon spacecraft for EscaPADE will demonstrate a more cost-effective approach to planetary exploration that will increase the science community’s access to our solar system for the better.”

The statement did not disclose the terms of the deal, and the original version of Rocket Lab’s press release even omitted with whom the contract was with, leading to erroneous reports that the contract was directly from NASA. Company spokesperson Morgan Bailey declined to disclose the value of the contract, but said it was “a phased contract beginning with design and progressing to a manufacturing stage” following agency reviews in June and July.

SSL did not respond to a request for comment on the contract. Missions under NASA’s SIMPLEx program have a cost cap of $55 million.

Also unclear are the launch arrangements for EscaPADE. Rocket Lab’s release said that the spacecraft will launch on a “NASA-provided commercial launch vehicle” in 2024. There are no NASA Mars missions scheduled for launch in 2024, meaning that EscaPADE would either need to find another mission with a compatible trajectory or have NASA procure a dedicated, and significantly more expensive, launch.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://spacenews.com/mars-smallsat-mission-gets-second-chance-with-rocket-lab/

Continue Reading

Aerospace

Watch live: Second spacewalk begins to install space station solar arrays

Published

on



Astronauts Thomas Pesquet and Shane Kimbrough floated outside the International Space Station Sunday on a spacewalk to complete deployment and unrolling of a new solar array blanket after encountering spacesuit glitches and an interference issue during a previous excursion Wednesday.

Pesquet and Kimbrough switched their spacesuits to battery power at 7:42 a.m. EDT (1142 GMT) Sunday to begin a planned six-and-a-half hour spacewalk. Pesquet, a European Space Agency astronaut, is designated EV1, or lead spacewalker, and is wearing a suit with red stripes. Kimbrough is where a white spacesuit without any markings.

The astronauts planned to move from the space station’s Quest airlock to the far port, or left, side of the lab’s solar power truss. Once in place, Pesquet and Kimbrough will complete tasks they started during Wednesday’s spacewalk.

The astronauts lost time while ground teams evaluated an issue with the controls and display module on Kimbrough’s suit Wednesday. Then mission control discussed momentary glitch with a sublimator, part of the cooling system on Kimbrough’s suit.

The astronauts continued the spacewalk and moved a new ISS Roll-Out Solar Array, or iROSA, unit from a temporary mounting fixture to the far port side of the station’s truss. Once at the P6 solar array work site, the astronauts attached the iROSA to a mounting fixture installed on preparatory spacewalk earlier this year, then attempted to unfold the unit like a book.

But the astronauts ran into some interference as they tried to unfold the iROSA unit. With Pesquet and Kimbrough already running behind schedule due to the earlier spacesuit issues, mission control called it quits and told the astronauts to head back inside the space station.

The spacewalk Sunday was originally planned to install a second iROSA solar array on the other side of the P6 truss, but now Pesquet and Kimbrough will try to complete the tasks they didn’t accomplish Wednesday.

Kimbrough, a former U.S. Army helicopter pilot making the eighth spacewalk of his career, swapped spacesuits for Sunday’s excursion after the troubles with his suit Wednesday.

The International Space Station has eight power channels, each fed with electrical power generated from one solar array wing extending from the station’s truss backbone. The original solar panels launched on four space shuttle missions from 2000 to 2009.

As expected, the solar panel efficiency has degraded over time. NASA is upgrading the space station’s power system with the new roll-out solar arrays, which will partially cover six of the station’s eight original solar panels.

Each of the new iROSA wings will be canted at an angle of 10 degrees relative to the space station’s existing solar panels. Credit: NASA

The first pair of iROSA wings will go on the oldest solar panel module — named P6 — on the far left, or port, side of the space station. They launched to the space station on a SpaceX Cargo Dragon capsule earlier this month. The new solar arrays were supplied to NASA by Boeing, Redwire, and a team of subcontractors.

The roll-out solar arrays will stretch 63 feet long and 20 feet wide (19-by-6 meters), about half the length and half the width of the station’s current solar arrays. Despite their smaller size, each of the new arrays will generate about the same amount of electricity as each of the station’s existing solar panels.

A mounting bracket will plug the new arrays into the station’s power channels and rotary joints, which keep the solar wings pointed at the sun as the spacecraft races around Earth at more than 17,000 mph. The new arrays will be angled 10 degrees from the old solar panels.

On Sunday’s spacewalk, Pesquet and Kimbrough will work to unfold the iROSA solar array on the 2B power channel at the P6 truss segment. The astronauts will drive bolts to secure the array in place, then mate power cables to connect the new array to the space station’s electrical grid.

The cables must be mated when the space station is flying over the night side of the Earth, when the old P6 solar array is not drawing any power. Then the astronauts will release clamps keeping the roll-out solar array spooled in its launch configuration.

The array will unroll using strain energy in the composite booms supporting the solar blanket, eliminating the need for motors to control deployment. The carbon fiber booms are rolled back against their natural shape for storage during launch.

If the astronauts complete their work with the first iROSA unit, they will head back in-board on the truss to prep a second iROSA for attachment to the 4B power channel on the opposite side of the P6 truss during a future spacewalk.

Email the author.

Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/20/us-eva-75/

Continue Reading

Aerospace

Computer problem takes Hubble offline

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Spacecraft controllers are continuing to work on a faulty computer memory system on NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope that has stopped telescope operations for nearly a week.

A payload computer on Hubble stopped working June 13, the agency said in a June 16 statement. Engineers speculated that the computer, used to manage operations of Hubble’s science instruments, malfunctioned because of a degrading memory module, putting the instruments into a safe mode.

The agency said at the time that it would switch of a backup memory module that day and, after about a day of testing, restart the instruments and resume science observations.

However, in a June 18 statement, NASA said those efforts to switch to a backup memory module failed because “the command to initiate the backup module failed to complete.” An attempt to restore the computer with both the original memory module and the backup unit also failed.

NASA didn’t elaborate on the next steps it will take to correct the problem stating only that the operations team “will be running tests and collecting more information on the system to further isolate the problem.” The instruments themselves, and the rest of the telescope, remain in good health.

The payload computer is a 1980s-vintage system that can use any one of four memory modules, each containing 64 kilobytes of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor memory. A backup computer is also available.

This is not the first technical glitch for Hubble, launched 31 years ago and last serviced by the space shuttle 12 years ago. In March, a problem linked to a software “enhancement” recently uploaded to the telescope put the telescope into a safe mode for several days. A faulty gyro took the telescope offline for three weeks in October 2018.

“We do have anomalies. That happens when you have a decades-old observatory, but we have been able to resolve those anomalies,” Nancy Levenson, deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, said at a town hall session during the 238th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society June 8.

She emphasized that the telescope, in general, was working well and remained in high demand among astronomers. The institute, which handles science operations of Hubble and, soon, the James Webb Space Telescope, is making plans for extended operations of Hubble.

“We’re continuing to plan for the very long term,” she said. One example she gave was “COS 2030,” a program to extend the life of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, an instrument installed on Hubble on that final servicing mission in 2009, through the end of the decade.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://spacenews.com/computer-problem-takes-hubble-offline/

Continue Reading
Esports5 days ago

World of Warcraft 9.1 Release Date: When is it?

Esports2 days ago

Select Smart Genshin Impact: How to Make the Personality Quiz Work

Energy5 days ago

Biocides Market worth $13.6 billion by 2026 – Exclusive Report by MarketsandMarkets™

Esports5 days ago

Here are the patch notes for Brawl Stars’ Jurassic Splash update

Blockchain2 days ago

Bitmain Released New Mining Machines For DOGE And LTC

Blockchain4 days ago

PancakeSwap (CAKE) Price Prediction 2021-2025: Will CAKE Hit $60 by 2021?

Esports4 days ago

Here are the patch notes for Call of Duty: Warzone’s season 4 update

Esports4 days ago

How to complete Path to Glory Update SBC in FIFA 21 Ultimate Team

Energy5 days ago

XCMG dostarcza ponad 100 sztuk żurawi dostosowanych do regionu geograficznego dla międzynarodowych klientów

Blockchain4 days ago

Will Jeff Bezos & Kim Kardashian Take “SAFEMOON to the Moon”?

Gaming5 days ago

MUCK: Best Seeds To Get Great Loot Instantly | Seeds List

Esports4 days ago

How to Get the Valorant ‘Give Back’ Skin Bundle

Esports4 days ago

How to unlock the MG 82 and C58 in Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War season 4

Blockchain3 days ago

Digital Renminbi and Cash Exchange Service ATMs Launch in Beijing

Aviation3 days ago

Southwest celebrates 50 Years with a new “Freedom One” logo jet on N500WR

Esports4 days ago

How to unlock the Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War season 4 battle pass

Blockchain3 days ago

Bitcoin isn’t as Anonymous as People Think it is: Cornell Economist

Aviation2 days ago

Delta Air Lines Drops Cape Town With Nonstop Johannesburg A350 Flights

AR/VR4 days ago

Larcenauts Review-In-Progress: A Rich VR Shooter With Room To Improve

Blockchain3 days ago

Index Publisher MSCI Considers Launching Crypto Indexes

Trending