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Collaborating with the ocean is essential to addressing climate change and environmental justice

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“The potential for the “blue economy” — one that combines more thoughtful stewardship of the ocean’s resources and economic opportunity with a more pragmatic, respectful approach to protecting coastal ecosystems — is vast. But with more than $1.5 trillion in annual economic value linked to ocean-based activities, the time is right to place the world’s seas at the center of a climate-centric post-pandemic recovery. This discussion will center on the role ocean solutions can play in addressing both climate change and systemic environmental justice issues.

This session was held at GreenBiz Group’s VERGE 20, October 26-30, 2020. Learn more about the event here: https://events.greenbiz.com/events/ve…

Watch our other must-see talks here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwW3…

OUR LINKS Website: https://www.greenbiz.com/

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Houston Area Tesla Crash: NTSB Preliminary Report Confirms Tesla’s Statements, Raises Questions About Local Investigation

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A few days ago, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released its preliminary report for the investigation of the April 17th crash of a Tesla near Houston, Texas. The NTSB’s findings confirm statements Tesla made and show that there was indeed a driver in the seat before the crash. The preliminary report also raises questions about statements made by responders after the crash.

What We Learned From Tesla So Far

The recently released preliminary report gives us a quick summary of what they’ve found so far about the accident. While it’s very informative, we do have to keep in mind that the investigation continues. It all seems to line up pretty well, though, with what Tesla’s VP of engineering told us during the Q1 earnings call:

“Regarding the crash in Houston specifically, we worked directly with the local authorities, NTSB, and NHTSA wherever applicable, and whenever they reach out to us for help directly on the engineering level and whenever else we can support.

“In that vein, we did a study with them over the past week to understand what happened in that particular crash and what we’ve learned from that effort was that autosteer did not and could not engage on the road conditions as it was designed. Our adaptive cruise control only engaged when a driver was buckled and above 5 miles per hour, and it only accelerated to 30 miles per hour over the distance before the car crashed. As well, adaptive cruise control disengaged the cars fully to complete to a stop when the driver’s seatbelt was unbuckled.

“Through further investigation of the vehicle and the accident remains, we inspected the car with NTSB and NHTSA and the local police and were able to find that the steering wheel was indeed deformed, leading to a likelihood that someone was in the driver’s seat at the time of the crash and all seatbelts post-crash were found to be unbuckled.

“We were unable to recover the data from the SD card at the time of impact, but the local authorities are working on doing that, and we await their report.”

Just to clarify, as I did in this other article, they were talking about a test vehicle that Tesla ran to help NHTSA complete their investigation. They determined that lane centering would not activate on that particular road, and they confirmed that traffic aware cruise control (TACC, aka Active/Adaptive Cruise Control or ACC) could not have propelled the vehicle to faster than 30 MPH in the distance the vehicle was known to have driven prior to crashing. Also, the feature wouldn’t work anyway, as the occupants were not buckled in at the time of the crash and ACC won’t work without a seatbelt fastened.

More importantly, though, Tesla was aware that there was evidence that a driver was in the driver’s seat at the time of the collision, which contradicted an early statement made by local law enforcement. Local Constable (an elected law enforcement/court office) Mark Herman said that they were “100% certain” that there was nobody in the driver’s seat.

The NTSB report confirms all of this and gives us some more detail.

The Preliminary Report

Photograph of the crash site, provided by National Transportation Safety Board (Public Domain)

The second paragraph gives us some very important information:

“The crash trip originated at the owner’s residence near the end of a cul-de-sac. Footage from the owner’s home security camera shows the owner entering the car’s driver’s seat and the passenger entering the front passenger seat. The car leaves and travels about 550 feet before departing the road on a curve, driving over the curb, and hitting a drainage culvert, a raised manhole, and a tree.”

Most importantly, it’s clear now that the vehicle did indeed have a driver. The owner was seen on camera getting into the driver’s door, and the passenger into the passenger’s door. Neither of them got into the back or were seen vacating their seats in the driveway. After that, the vehicle quickly accelerated, going 550 feet and hitting several things before running into the tree.

While CleanTechnica‘s writers have already dismissed the idea of Autopilot abuse, this is the clearest confirmation yet that Autopilot was not a factor in this accident.

Another piece of information thoroughly rules out TACC abuse:

“The crash damaged the front of the car’s high-voltage lithium-ion battery case, where a fire started. The fire destroyed the car, including the onboard storage device inside the infotainment console (figure 2).”

Photograph of the vehicle’s wreckage, provided by National Transportation Safety Board (Public Domain)

The level of damage here is not consistent at all with a 30 MPH collision, and that’s the fastest TACC could have brought the vehicle in 550 feet. Clearly, the vehicle was under the full manual control of the driver.

The Local Investigation Should Be Treated With Skepticism For Now

NTSB tells us that there’s a separate local investigation into the accident being conducted by Constable Mark Herman and other local officials, and this is the same guy who told media that his investigators were “100% certain” there was nobody in the driver’s seat that night. Since then, his office has refused to release records detailing how they determined this when video evidence and a deformed steering wheel both later disproved it.

It could be an honest mistake based on limited evidence, as they might not have seen the video or the wheel before the Constable made that statement. If that’s the case, though, I don’t see why their office won’t release public records as required by Texas law. Sure, active criminal investigations can be exempted, but there’s clearly no living person to prosecute, and thus no actual criminal investigation. Hopefully they’ll release that information soon.

At this point, my opinion is that media outlets that were led astray by his initial statements would be smart to take statements from his office with a grain of salt, and compare them to the findings of other investigating entities, until we get a reasonable explanation for the erroneous early statements. [Editor’s note: I would also advise that such media outlets have people who understand how Tesla vehicles work covering Tesla news. It was clear to many Tesla owners very quickly that the statement didn’t make sense and early coverage didn’t match the technology. I’ll write more about this in a separate piece. —Zach]

Remaining Question: How Did The Driver End Up In The Back?

This is a remaining question that we don’t have an answer for yet, and it’s entirely possible that we may never know.

One possibility this preliminary report uncovers is that impacts prior to the final crash could have resulted in the driver being thrown to the back. It says they went over a curb, struck a drainage culvert, and then a raised manhole cover before the final impact with the tree. The curb seems pretty flat in the photos, but we don’t know how big or raised the culvert and manhole covers are.

Other possibilities, like the driver attempting to escape flames, are certainly still plausible. Wilder things I’ve seen people posit, like a third person who fled the scene, are pretty well debunked at this point, though.

Featured image: Photograph of the crash site (cropped), provided by National Transportation Safety Board (Public Domain)


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Houston Area Tesla Crash: NTSB Preliminary Report Confirms Tesla’s Statements, Raises Questions About Local Investigation

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A few days ago, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released its preliminary report for the investigation of the April 17th crash of a Tesla near Houston, Texas. The NTSB’s findings confirm statements Tesla made and show that there was indeed a driver in the seat before the crash. The preliminary report also raises questions about statements made by responders after the crash.

What We Learned From Tesla So Far

The recently released preliminary report gives us a quick summary of what they’ve found so far about the accident. While it’s very informative, we do have to keep in mind that the investigation continues. It all seems to line up pretty well, though, with what Tesla’s VP of engineering told us during the Q1 earnings call:

“Regarding the crash in Houston specifically, we worked directly with the local authorities, NTSB, and NHTSA wherever applicable, and whenever they reach out to us for help directly on the engineering level and whenever else we can support.

“In that vein, we did a study with them over the past week to understand what happened in that particular crash and what we’ve learned from that effort was that autosteer did not and could not engage on the road conditions as it was designed. Our adaptive cruise control only engaged when a driver was buckled and above 5 miles per hour, and it only accelerated to 30 miles per hour over the distance before the car crashed. As well, adaptive cruise control disengaged the cars fully to complete to a stop when the driver’s seatbelt was unbuckled.

“Through further investigation of the vehicle and the accident remains, we inspected the car with NTSB and NHTSA and the local police and were able to find that the steering wheel was indeed deformed, leading to a likelihood that someone was in the driver’s seat at the time of the crash and all seatbelts post-crash were found to be unbuckled.

“We were unable to recover the data from the SD card at the time of impact, but the local authorities are working on doing that, and we await their report.”

Just to clarify, as I did in this other article, they were talking about a test vehicle that Tesla ran to help NHTSA complete their investigation. They determined that lane centering would not activate on that particular road, and they confirmed that traffic aware cruise control (TACC, aka Active/Adaptive Cruise Control or ACC) could not have propelled the vehicle to faster than 30 MPH in the distance the vehicle was known to have driven prior to crashing. Also, the feature wouldn’t work anyway, as the occupants were not buckled in at the time of the crash and ACC won’t work without a seatbelt fastened.

More importantly, though, Tesla was aware that there was evidence that a driver was in the driver’s seat at the time of the collision, which contradicted an early statement made by local law enforcement. Local Constable (an elected law enforcement/court office) Mark Herman said that they were “100% certain” that there was nobody in the driver’s seat.

The NTSB report confirms all of this and gives us some more detail.

The Preliminary Report

Photograph of the crash site, provided by National Transportation Safety Board (Public Domain)

The second paragraph gives us some very important information:

“The crash trip originated at the owner’s residence near the end of a cul-de-sac. Footage from the owner’s home security camera shows the owner entering the car’s driver’s seat and the passenger entering the front passenger seat. The car leaves and travels about 550 feet before departing the road on a curve, driving over the curb, and hitting a drainage culvert, a raised manhole, and a tree.”

Most importantly, it’s clear now that the vehicle did indeed have a driver. The owner was seen on camera getting into the driver’s door, and the passenger into the passenger’s door. Neither of them got into the back or were seen vacating their seats in the driveway. After that, the vehicle quickly accelerated, going 550 feet and hitting several things before running into the tree.

While CleanTechnica‘s writers have already dismissed the idea of Autopilot abuse, this is the clearest confirmation yet that Autopilot was not a factor in this accident.

Another piece of information thoroughly rules out TACC abuse:

“The crash damaged the front of the car’s high-voltage lithium-ion battery case, where a fire started. The fire destroyed the car, including the onboard storage device inside the infotainment console (figure 2).”

Photograph of the vehicle’s wreckage, provided by National Transportation Safety Board (Public Domain)

The level of damage here is not consistent at all with a 30 MPH collision, and that’s the fastest TACC could have brought the vehicle in 550 feet. Clearly, the vehicle was under the full manual control of the driver.

The Local Investigation Should Be Treated With Skepticism For Now

NTSB tells us that there’s a separate local investigation into the accident being conducted by Constable Mark Herman and other local officials, and this is the same guy who told media that his investigators were “100% certain” there was nobody in the driver’s seat that night. Since then, his office has refused to release records detailing how they determined this when video evidence and a deformed steering wheel both later disproved it.

It could be an honest mistake based on limited evidence, as they might not have seen the video or the wheel before the Constable made that statement. If that’s the case, though, I don’t see why their office won’t release public records as required by Texas law. Sure, active criminal investigations can be exempted, but there’s clearly no living person to prosecute, and thus no actual criminal investigation. Hopefully they’ll release that information soon.

At this point, my opinion is that media outlets that were led astray by his initial statements would be smart to take statements from his office with a grain of salt, and compare them to the findings of other investigating entities, until we get a reasonable explanation for the erroneous early statements. [Editor’s note: I would also advise that such media outlets have people who understand how Tesla vehicles work covering Tesla news. It was clear to many Tesla owners very quickly that the statement didn’t make sense and early coverage didn’t match the technology. I’ll write more about this in a separate piece. —Zach]

Remaining Question: How Did The Driver End Up In The Back?

This is a remaining question that we don’t have an answer for yet, and it’s entirely possible that we may never know.

One possibility this preliminary report uncovers is that impacts prior to the final crash could have resulted in the driver being thrown to the back. It says they went over a curb, struck a drainage culvert, and then a raised manhole cover before the final impact with the tree. The curb seems pretty flat in the photos, but we don’t know how big or raised the culvert and manhole covers are.

Other possibilities, like the driver attempting to escape flames, are certainly still plausible. Wilder things I’ve seen people posit, like a third person who fled the scene, are pretty well debunked at this point, though.

Featured image: Photograph of the crash site (cropped), provided by National Transportation Safety Board (Public Domain)


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Now’s the Time for Bold Investments in Transportation

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Courtesy of NRDC
By Deron Lovaas 

We are confronted with two historic challenges as we emerge from a pandemic: the legacy of racism and the threats of climate change. Transportation policy and investments are a pivotal part of any climate plan, and we also have a chance to reconnect Black and brown communities divided and disadvantaged by past ill-conceived infrastructure investments. Thankfully, there are a suite of technologies and policies that can help transform transportation so it is a greener, more just sector.

The question is, as we reach the midpoint of May, are there “policy vehicles,” or bills, to carry them over the finish line this Congress?

The answer, frustratingly, is yes and no. President Biden has proposed an infrastructure measure that is historic in its ambition and the House of Representatives is working on improving an ambitious proposal it passed last year. But the Senate committee is considering a measure that is, unfortunately, not up to the task.

First, the good news. President Biden has set the bold goal of halving heat-trapping pollution from its 2005 level by 2030 and outlined a proposal in the American Job Plan that will jump-start efforts to get there. The American Jobs Plan would help us slash emissions thanks to its huge investments in rail, public transportation, and bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

Another piece of good news is that last summer the House of Representatives passed the Investing in a New Vision for the Environment and Surface Transportation in America Act or INVEST Act bill. This bill, as colleagues wrote in its wake, is possibly the greenest transportation bill yet. It includes improvements to the planning provisions of transportation law that direct states to measure and reduce greenhouse gas emissions as part of their planning. It is frankly shocking that states aren’t already doing this. The time is way, way overdue in which this should be a standard part of transportation planning. It also includes substantial investments in low-carbon transportation modes as well as electrification infrastructure for our vehicle fleet. And it includes substantial funding for climate resilience, a desperate necessity given climate change already here and en route since we have delayed so long in solving this crisis.

The Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in the House is working on a new bill which is likely to resemble the INVEST Act, although it could be further improved if amended with smaller, explicitly climate-focused proposals being added to the hopper (e.g., the GREEN Streets Actthe BRAIN TRAIN Actthe Green Transportation Act, as well as additional forthcoming bills).

The bad news? The Senate picture is harder to make out. Unlike the House, jurisdiction is divided between a few committees, with the Environment and Public Works Committee (or EPW, which handles what has traditionally been the largest section, the bill’s highway title) setting the initial tune. And it’s possible what it unveils will be harshly, destructively discordant with the President’s new climate goal. The only guide we currently have as to what they might unveil is America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act (ATIA) offered in 2019.

ATIA would NOT get us on a trajectory towards halving heat-trapping pollution. While it is nominally greener than previous transportation laws, it falls well short of what we need. This bill is, in short, a highway-expansion-centered, high-pollution proposal at odds with the President’s climate goal. The Senate bill’s handful of green sections are eclipsed by its many status-quo provisions. It keeps us in the same old rut transportation policy has been in since the 1956 Interstate Highway Act, when all federal leaders envisioned was coast-to-coast ribbons of pavement. Transportation for America does a good job at hammering at it for this, noting for example that the climate title accounts for less than 4% of the funding in the bill.

In sum, three major policy vehicles are on the racetrack: The American Jobs Plan, INVEST Act 2.0, and EPW’s highway title. And they all must pass a new test: Do they help us halve climate pollution by 2030, or do they take us on a crash course instead? Two of them are on the right track; the legacy Senate EPW bill, however, is not.

NRDC’s analysis shows we can achieve President Biden’s goals and avoid the worst of climate change. It will be no mean feat, as you can see with the help of a handy policy scenario-building tool called the Energy Policy Simulator (EPS) courtesy of Energy Innovation, LLC and the Rocky Mountain Institute. A good place to start in looking for reductions, using the Sutton rule, is the single largest source of emissions: Transportation. You can turn the dials on different policies in the EPS, and in transportation the main ones are vehicle efficiency improvements, vehicle electrification, and shifting travel to low-carbon means (e.g., bus, train, biking, walking). And as you turn the dials it becomes crystal clear: We must do all we can.

We have lost too much time debating measures that lack the ambition we need. The President and Congress must develop a transportation program that addresses our climate emergency. Anything less than that is unacceptable.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/12/nows-the-time-for-bold-investments-in-transportation/

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Louisiana Wants To Become A Sanctuary State For Fossil Fuels

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There’s a small town little ways north of my hometown of Shreveport, LA. This small town is named Oil City, and it was founded as a flag stop along the Kansas City Southern Railroad. It was once called Ananias. Most of the settlers were fisherman, trappers, and farmers. Some of the settlers harvested the freshwater pearls after they were discovered in mussels in 1909. In 1895, Ananias along with Surrey and Caddo City, were absorbed into Oil City, whose name represents what Louisiana is well known for.

Sure we have the parades during Mardi Gras and Carnival, we have festivals and great food, but we also have toxic air, and although Cancer Alley is mostly along the southern portion of the Mississippi, north Louisiana also has its fair share of oil refineries that pollute the air. Make no doubt about it: Louisiana is an oil state.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), my home state has 17 oil refineries, which account for almost one-fifth of the nation’s refining capacity and process around 3.4 million barrels of crude oil daily. Some other quick facts from the EIA are noted below, taken from its website.

  • Louisiana is one of the top five states in both natural gas production and proved reserves. The state accounted for 9% of U.S. total marketed gas production in 2020 and has about 8% of the nation’s gas reserves.
  • In 2020, Louisiana’s two liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminals shipped out about 55% of U.S. total LNG exports.
  • Louisiana’s total energy consumption and per capita energy consumption both rank among the top three states in the nation, largely because of its energy-intensive chemical, petroleum, and natural gas industries.
  • Louisiana has the highest per capita residential sector electricity consumption in the nation. More than 6 in 10 Louisiana households rely on electric heating and almost all households have air conditioning.

My mother always said that Louisianans would intentionally vote for the worst politician so we wouldn’t be surprised when they did something illegal. So, it comes as no shock to me that Louisiana is pushing a bill that, if made into law, would make my state a sanctuary for fossil fuels.

Sanctuary State For Fossil Fuels

An article from The Guardian opened up describing a very familiar place to me — south of Oil City. Shreveport, where my first job was working in a casino restaurant, is cited as having some of the most toxic air in the country. Oil refineries that are owned by Calumet and UOP have contributed to my hometown’s toxic emissions, according to the EPA’s Toxic Release Inventory. I believe it — after all, I had the onset of asthma at age 14, and it doesn’t even run in my family. Could be random, could be caused by toxic air.

Louisiana Representative Danny McCormick (Republican) introduced a bill that would protect oil companies, not residents in his district who have to breathe this air. The bill aims to establish Louisiana as a “fossil fuel sanctuary state” and ban local and state employees from enforcing federal laws and regulations that negatively impact petrochemical companies. This is so messed up, but I am not surprised.

McCormick said that the inspiration for the bill came after President Biden began placing new restrictions on oil and gas companies. Those restrictions include a pause on new oil and gas leases on federal lands and waters. “Look at what they did to the coal industry,” he said, while speaking at a Louisiana house committee hearing. “We already know what the game plan is. They already picked off coal. Now they’re going after oil and gas.” (Technically, coal declined massively under the Trump years.)

What he didn’t touch upon was that, in 2012, the global mortality rate based on energy source put coal far ahead at #1 (in a bad way). The death rate from coal power was estimated at around 100,000 deaths per terawatt-hour. The death rate was based on mining extraction operations and the actual burning of coal. So, yes, coal had to go. And, yes, fossil fuels have to go. This is why it’s so critical we embrace renewables.

McCormick’s Ties To The Oil Industry

Before becoming a legislator, McCormick, who owns M&M Oil in Oil City, was a member of the Louisiana Oil and Gas Association, which is an industry lobbying group. So, in essence, we have a representative trying to protect his own business as well as those of others in his industry. According to ShaleXP, M&M Oil owns several actively producing oil wells, mostly in Caddo Parish and some in Texas.

Some key data points for M&M Oil include:

  • Operating states: LA, TX
  • Production Dates: August 1994 — May 2021
  • Total Oil Production: 1,028,448 barrels of oil (BBLs)
  • Total Gas Production: 423,544 thousand cubic feet (MCF)
  • Estimated Daily Oil Production: 96 BBLs
  • Estimated Daily Gas Production: 0 MCF
  • Estimated Daily Water Production: 0 BBLs
  • Producing Wells: 47.

Concerns Over McCormick’s Proposed Legislation

In an interview with The Guardian, Velma White, 71, who lives in McCormick’s district is very concerned about the proposed legislation. “It’s going to hurt the people,” she said about the bill. “I don’t think it’s right to the people.” She also lives a block away from Calumet Shreveport Refining and believes that her family’s health problems were caused by air emissions from the plant. Her daughter was diagnosed with renal failure at a young age and her husband and sisters have also had health problems. Of the refinery, she said, “They have literally put me and my family through hell,” and added, “I know there ought to be somebody who cares about the people’s lives.”

The article also detailed her horror story. Some of the things she went through due to this refinery included a miscarriage, nausea, and breathing problems. She was offered $2,500 to settle her 20-year-old claim against the oil companies in January of this year. “That’s what they offered me,” she said. “I’m just dumbfounded.” She had a miscarriage and they offered her $2,500. Let that sink in — these oil companies don’t care about the health of the people.

The Bill Was Tabled But Still Has Support

The bill was tabled due to concerns regarding the current language’s potential to cause the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to revoke the state’s authority to enforce federal rules. However, the Chairman of the Louisiana House Natural Resources and the Environment Committee, Jean-Paul P. Coussan (R-Lafayette), gave his support. He said that he would work with McCormick to resolve issues with the bill that could give the federal government more power over oil and gas companies in Louisiana.

“You’re not going to find a bigger support of oil and gas in his legislature than maybe you and I,” Coussan said to McCormick at the committee hearing. “We can tighten this up so all our oil and gas constituents can be proud of the bill. The intent is to help industry not to end up in court just for a headline.”

Featured photo taken by Johnna Crider. (View of the Red River and Bossier City, LA, from the Shreveport side).


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