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Windows 11 reminds the PC ecosystem of the value of major releases

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A tech trade show attendee in the early 1990s might have encountered a T-shirt bearing a cryptic taunt: “Flight 4.0 to Chicago has been delayed.” “Chicago” was the codename for what was presumed to become Windows 4.0. Unfortunately for IBM, which distributed the shirt, customers flocked to the derided release when it finally came to market as Windows 95, marking the beginning of the end of Big Blue’s rival OS/2.

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The reception to Windows Vista, another Microsoft operating system delayed to the point that even the waits for its betas became contentious, was not as warm. And after years of pursuing a macOS overhaul codenamed Copland, Apple retreated to the far less ambitious Mac OS 8 in 1997. That was the same year it acquired NeXT, laying the foundation for a true overhaul, macOS X, in 2001.

The pain of engineering massive OS revisions in part led both Apple and Microsoft to transition to less impactful, more frequent updates. For well over a decade, macOS updates have arrived virtually every year alongside updates to the operating systems of its cross-device progeny, and Microsoft has settled into a biannual upgrade cycle for Windows 10. These updates have faced a far less perilous development journey than Copland or Windows Vista did.

But, as I noted last year in my column on Adobe switching to a subscription-only model for Creative Suite, incremental improvements pose challenges in driving the kind of marketing excitement that once had PC owners lining up to buy new versions of Windows at now-defunct retailers such as CompUSA. Adobe notes that it has shifted to more of an events-driven approach to drum up excitement about new features for its audience of professional creators.

Apple has also relied heavily on its WWDC event to excite developers and customers about new OS features. However, macOS has become a relatively small part of that message, as what Apple actually offers developers is a cross-device “super OS” with various flavors that also run on a phone, tablet, watch, and TV box.

As I noted in my column on Apple’s AI-related announcements at WWDC, many of the new features for macOS extend features from its sister OSs or drive participation in Apple integration efforts, e.g., taking part in a SharePlay stream, having the Mac act as an AirPlay 2 target, or the display coordination slickness of Universal Control (Disclaimer: Does not actually control universe). However, Apple’s promotion of even these kinds of features has been a shout from the rooftops, as opposed to the low-key introductions that have marked such Windows 10 updates as “20H2.”

What justifies a major new release is in the eye of the developer, but it often signifies a major update to an OS’s technical architecture, visual presentation/interface, or both. With the introduction of Big Sur, Apple finally moved macOS’s version number ahead to signify a major release: macOS 11. While its signature feature was the brilliant technical work to support Apple silicon, its user interface centerpiece was a paradoxical anchoring to the familiar to preserve the Mac experience on a new chip despite introducing iPad app compatibility.

Microsoft has clearly done major work around the look and feel for Windows 11, but hasn’t promoted much about its technical underpinnings beyond to say that it will run faster, more efficiently, and more securely. As with Big Sur, though, the ability to support mobile apps represents a significant addition, one that will surely take some time to smooth out, as it has for Apple.

The Windows 11 launch provided a timely opportunity for Microsoft to contrast its app store strategy to Apple’s. But long gone are the days when Windows was a mere foil for Apple. More fundamentally for Microsoft, after years of so much focus on the cloud and AI and mixed reality and Teams and Xbox Game Pass and GitHub and Surface and really anything but Windows, the Windows 11 announcement represented a long-delayed opportunity to celebrate its foundational client platform and the PC, and to catalyze its hardware partners’ marketing efforts.

In contrast, while Apple may credibly gush that it loves the Mac and has welcomed it into its new family of homegrown silicon to great effect, it represents but one in an ever-growing family of client device platforms vying for the company’s marketing and development affection.

PREVIOUS AND RELATED COVERAGE

OK Microsoft, you win: I’m buying a Windows 11 PC
Why did Microsoft initially cut off hardware support at Intel’s Generation 8 CPUs? We finally have the answer. Hey Intel, guess which PC I’m buying? An AMD Ryzen system.

Windows 11 upgrades: Why security is going to be the key driver
While the changes to Windows’ look and feel may grab the eye, the less visible security upgrades may be more interesting to CIOs.

How to bypass Windows 11 limits and install on almost any old PC
Kids, don’t try this at home!

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-11-reminds-the-pc-ecosystem-of-the-value-of-major-releases/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

ZDNET

Microsoft: Zero Trust security just hit the mainstream

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Zero Trust, the borderless security strategy being pushed by vendors, has fully caught on in the enterprise, according to Microsoft’s latest survey of cybersecurity defenders. 

Microsoft, IBM, Google, AWS, Cisco and others in the cybersecurity industry have been banging the ‘zero trust’ drum for the past few years. 

The case for zero trust was made clearer after this year’s software supply chain attacks on US tech firms, which came amid a mass shift to remote work that demonstrated the need to protect information inside and beyond a trusted environment in a world that spans BYOD, home networks, VPNs, cloud services and more.

As Microsoft has argued, part of zero trust is assuming the corporate network has already been breached, either by hackers targeting that network through phishing or malware, or via an employee’s compromised home device connecting to the network.

The message has gotten through to organizations. Microsoft’s survey of 1,200 security decision makers over the past year found that 96% of consider Zero Trust to be critical to their organization. 

Zero trust will also soon be compulsory for federal agencies, helping standardize the concept in the broader market. US president Joe Biden’s cybersecurity executive order in May mandated agencies move to zero-trust as-a-service architectures and enable two-factor authentication (2FA) within 180 days. 

The Commerce Department’s NIST followed up last week by calling on 18 of the US’s biggest cybersecurity vendors to demonstrate how they would implement a zero trust architecture.    

Microsoft found that 76 percent or organizations are in the process of implementing a Zero Trust architecture — up six percent from last year.

“The shift to hybrid work, accelerated by COVID-19, is also driving the move towards broader adoption of Zero Trust with 81 percent of organizations having already begun the move toward a hybrid workplace,” writes Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft corporate vice president of security, compliance and identity.

“Zero Trust will be critical to help maintain security amid the IT complexity that comes with hybrid work.”

The top reasons for adopting Zero Trust included increased security and compliance agility, speed of threat detection and remediation, and simplicity and availability of security analytics, according to Jakkal. 

It’s all about confirming everything is secure, across identity, endpoints, the network, and other resources using signals and data.

Biden this week highlighted the real-world stakes at play with recent ransomware and supply chain attacks on critical infrastructure, telling the US intelligence community that a major hack would likely be the reason the US enters “a real shooting war with a major power”. The US president yesterday signed a memorandum addressing cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, ordering CISA and NIST to create benchmarks for organizations managing critical infrastructure.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-zero-trust-security-just-hit-the-mainstream/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Microsoft: Zero Trust security just hit the mainstream

Published

on

Zero Trust, the borderless security strategy being pushed by vendors, has fully caught on in the enterprise, according to Microsoft’s latest survey of cybersecurity defenders. 

Microsoft, IBM, Google, AWS, Cisco and others in the cybersecurity industry have been banging the ‘zero trust’ drum for the past few years. 

The case for zero trust was made clearer after this year’s software supply chain attacks on US tech firms, which came amid a mass shift to remote work that demonstrated the need to protect information inside and beyond a trusted environment in a world that spans BYOD, home networks, VPNs, cloud services and more.

As Microsoft has argued, part of zero trust is assuming the corporate network has already been breached, either by hackers targeting that network through phishing or malware, or via an employee’s compromised home device connecting to the network.

The message has gotten through to organizations. Microsoft’s survey of 1,200 security decision makers over the past year found that 96% of consider Zero Trust to be critical to their organization. 

Zero trust will also soon be compulsory for federal agencies, helping standardize the concept in the broader market. US president Joe Biden’s cybersecurity executive order in May mandated agencies move to zero-trust as-a-service architectures and enable two-factor authentication (2FA) within 180 days. 

The Commerce Department’s NIST followed up last week by calling on 18 of the US’s biggest cybersecurity vendors to demonstrate how they would implement a zero trust architecture.    

Microsoft found that 76 percent or organizations are in the process of implementing a Zero Trust architecture — up six percent from last year.

“The shift to hybrid work, accelerated by COVID-19, is also driving the move towards broader adoption of Zero Trust with 81 percent of organizations having already begun the move toward a hybrid workplace,” writes Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft corporate vice president of security, compliance and identity.

“Zero Trust will be critical to help maintain security amid the IT complexity that comes with hybrid work.”

The top reasons for adopting Zero Trust included increased security and compliance agility, speed of threat detection and remediation, and simplicity and availability of security analytics, according to Jakkal. 

It’s all about confirming everything is secure, across identity, endpoints, the network, and other resources using signals and data.

Biden this week highlighted the real-world stakes at play with recent ransomware and supply chain attacks on critical infrastructure, telling the US intelligence community that a major hack would likely be the reason the US enters “a real shooting war with a major power”. The US president yesterday signed a memorandum addressing cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, ordering CISA and NIST to create benchmarks for organizations managing critical infrastructure.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-zero-trust-security-just-hit-the-mainstream/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

Continue Reading

ZDNET

Microsoft: Zero Trust security just hit the mainstream

Published

on

Zero Trust, the borderless security strategy being pushed by vendors, has fully caught on in the enterprise, according to Microsoft’s latest survey of cybersecurity defenders. 

Microsoft, IBM, Google, AWS, Cisco and others in the cybersecurity industry have been banging the ‘zero trust’ drum for the past few years. 

The case for zero trust was made clearer after this year’s software supply chain attacks on US tech firms, which came amid a mass shift to remote work that demonstrated the need to protect information inside and beyond a trusted environment in a world that spans BYOD, home networks, VPNs, cloud services and more.

As Microsoft has argued, part of zero trust is assuming the corporate network has already been breached, either by hackers targeting that network through phishing or malware, or via an employee’s compromised home device connecting to the network.

The message has gotten through to organizations. Microsoft’s survey of 1,200 security decision makers over the past year found that 96% of consider Zero Trust to be critical to their organization. 

Zero trust will also soon be compulsory for federal agencies, helping standardize the concept in the broader market. US president Joe Biden’s cybersecurity executive order in May mandated agencies move to zero-trust as-a-service architectures and enable two-factor authentication (2FA) within 180 days. 

The Commerce Department’s NIST followed up last week by calling on 18 of the US’s biggest cybersecurity vendors to demonstrate how they would implement a zero trust architecture.    

Microsoft found that 76 percent or organizations are in the process of implementing a Zero Trust architecture — up six percent from last year.

“The shift to hybrid work, accelerated by COVID-19, is also driving the move towards broader adoption of Zero Trust with 81 percent of organizations having already begun the move toward a hybrid workplace,” writes Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft corporate vice president of security, compliance and identity.

“Zero Trust will be critical to help maintain security amid the IT complexity that comes with hybrid work.”

The top reasons for adopting Zero Trust included increased security and compliance agility, speed of threat detection and remediation, and simplicity and availability of security analytics, according to Jakkal. 

It’s all about confirming everything is secure, across identity, endpoints, the network, and other resources using signals and data.

Biden this week highlighted the real-world stakes at play with recent ransomware and supply chain attacks on critical infrastructure, telling the US intelligence community that a major hack would likely be the reason the US enters “a real shooting war with a major power”. The US president yesterday signed a memorandum addressing cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, ordering CISA and NIST to create benchmarks for organizations managing critical infrastructure.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-zero-trust-security-just-hit-the-mainstream/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Apple broke bad news to iPhone fans

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We’ve known this was a problem.

I expected that if there was any time when Apple top brass would mention it, it would be during the earnings call.

And that’s when it happened.

Apple, like most other tech firms, is feeling the pinch due to component shortages.

A word that came up a lot during the call was “constraints.” It was up to Apple CFO Luca Maestri to break the bad news.

“… we expect supply constraints during the September quarter to be greater than what we experienced during the June quarter. The constraints will primarily impact iPhone and iPad.”

Must read: Don’t buy these Apple products: July 2021 edition

Normally, I’d put this down to scarcity marketing — “get in there quick with your iPhone orders, because otherwise you’ll miss out and the cool kids will laugh at you” sort of thing — but these supply constraints are real and is affecting almost every company that is involved in making things.

CEO Tim Cook went on to fill in some more details about the constraints.

“The majority of constraints we’re seeing are of the variety that I think others are saying that are I would classify as industry shortage. We do have some shortages, in addition to that, that are where the demand has been so great and so beyond our own expectation that it’s difficult to get the entire set of parts within the lead times that we try to get those. So it’s a little bit of that as well.”

A little bit of this, a little bit of that.

On the whole, Apple does like to underpromise and overdeliver, especially where Wall Street is concerned, so it doesn’t surprise me that there’s this air of caution.

It makes sense.

The landscape is changing rapidly.

But I think that it’s interesting and somewhat telling that Apple was willing to make such a statement, a statement that caused stocks to fall as a result.

This statement was not made lightly.

If you’re someone who likes getting a new iPhone as soon as they’re out, you might have to work a little harder this year.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/apple-broke-bad-news-to-iphone-fans/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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