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Which Airlines Operate The Most Embraer E2 Aircraft?

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Brazilian manufacturer Embraer is a big name when it comes to regional aircraft. It has produced more than 1,500 examples of its popular four-abreast E-Jet family. This series first flew in March 2004 with LOT Polish Airlines. In recent years, the company has developed the next generation of its E-Jets, known as the E2. But which airlines fly the most examples of these new aircraft?

Widerøe Embraer E190-E2
Norwegian regional airline Widerøe launched the E190-E2 commercially in April 2018, but is it one of its largest operators? Photo: Valentin Hintikka via Flickr

The E-Jet E2 family in a nutshell

Embraer is producing three variants of its next-generation E-Jet E2 family. These will draw on the success of its existing models, while implementing new technology to enhance their performance. The smallest of these is the E175-E2, of which Embraer has currently produced just one test aircraft. It completed its first test flight in December 2019, but isn’t expected to enter commercial service until 2023.

However, the larger E2 family members have already been gracing the skies for several years. Widerøe flew the first-ever commercial E2 flight when it launched the E190-E2 on April 24th, 2018. The E195-E2 is the family’s largest variant, and Brazilian carrier Azul took delivery of the first of these in September 2019.

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Embraer E-Jet E2 Profit Hunter Getty
Embraer has nicknamed the E2 ‘Profit Hunter’ due to its high efficiency and subsequent low operating costs. Photo: Getty Images

Operators of the E190-E2

As we have established, Widerøe had the honor of launching the E2 series commercially in April 2018, with the E190-E2. However, it is not the largest operator of the type. According to Planespotters.net, that is a title held by Swiss regional airline Helvetic Airways. This carrier operates eight examples of the E190-E2, the last of which arrived just a week ago.

Next-highest in the admittedly fairly short list of E190-E2 operators is Kazakh flag carrier Air Astana. The airline flies five examples of the type, which are fitted with a two-class 108-seat configuration. Rounding off the podium in third place is launch customer and Norwegian regional carrier Widerøe, which has four E190-E2s. The fourth and final E190-E2 is arguably the most obscure, namely Air Kiribati. This Pacific Island carrier operates just one example.

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Helvetic Airways Embraer E190-E2
Helvetic Airways is the largest operator of the E190-E2, with eight aircraft. Photo: Markus Eigenheer via Flickr

Operators of the E195-E2

Planespotters.net lists a slightly wider variety of carriers when it comes to operators of the larger E195-E2. The largest of these is Azul which, having received the first examples 18 months ago, now operates nine E195-E2s. One of these bears a striking special livery that features macaw birds and is based on São Paulo’s famous street graffiti.

The next-largest operator of the E195-E2 is Spanish regional carrier Binter Canarias. It received its first example in November 2019, and now operates four examples of the type. It received its fourth E195-E2 just last night, arriving in Las Palmas at 23:45, according to RadarBox.com.

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Third place in terms of E195-E2 operators is a position shared by the type’s remaining operators. Each of these three carriers has two examples of the type. KLM Cityhopper received both of its examples last month, one of which had an eventful start to life after a lightning strike in Berlin!

Embraer new livery
Azul’s special E195-E2 livery. Photo: Embraer

Elsewhere, private Nigerian carrier Air Peace has also received two E195-E2 aircraft since the turn of the year. These feature an innovative business class cabin that gives passengers direct aisle access through a staggered 2-2 configuration.

Finally, Belarussian flag carrier Belavia received an early Christmas present in the form of its first E195-E2 on December 21st, 2020. It continued the celebratory theme by receiving its second example on its 25th birthday last week! With plenty more orders in the bag, it will be interesting to see how the E2 series shakes up the regional market in years to come.

Have you ever flown on an Embraer E2 family aircraft? If so, with which carrier, and what was it like? Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments!

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/which-airlines-operate-the-most-embraer-e2-aircraft/

Aviation

United Airlines Posts $1.4bn Net Loss As It Seeks Profitability

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United Airlines has reported its first-quarter 2021 financial results. The airline reported a net loss for the quarter of $1.4 billion. A difficult result, the airline does have some celebrations from the quarter, including in continued cost-cutting as it positions for a recovery. Part of the airline’s planning includes getting the airline to profitability even if business and long-haul international does not come back fully.

United Boeing 787
United posted a net loss of $1.4 billion in the first quarter. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

United’s first-quarter results

United reported a net loss for the first quarter of $1.357 billion. This was on total operating revenue of over $3.2 billion, which was down 66% compared to the same quarter in 2019. Excluding special charges, United recorded operating expenses down 34% from the same quarter in 2019.

All in all, the airline ended the first quarter with available liquidity of $21 billion. Its cash burn for the first quarter was an average of $9 million per day, which was a $10 million per day improvement versus the fourth quarter.

However, one bright spot in the airline’s results was March. United returned to positive core cash flow in March as passengers showed a strong desire to fly again. The carrier is now positioning itself for the future.

United Boeing 787
In March, the uptick in travel and bookings led the airline to be cash positive for the first time in about a year. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

CEO Scott Kirby stated the following on the results:

“The United team has now spent a year facing down the most disruptive crisis our industry has ever faced and because of their skill and dedication to our customers, we’re poised to emerge from this pandemic with a future that is brighter than ever. We’ve shifted our focus to the next milestone on the horizon and now see a clear path to profitability. We’re encouraged by the strong evidence of pent-up demand for air travel and our continued ability to nimbly match it, which is why we’re as confident as ever that we’ll hit our goal to exceed 2019 adjusted EBITDA margins in 2023, if not sooner.”

Other highlights of the quarter including resuming hiring, planning on training 5,000 new pilots with a focus on making sure that cost is not prohibitive for pilots to join the industry, pushing greener operations, and returning to New York’s JFK International Airport.

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Looking to the long-term future

United is still preparing for an uncertain future. The current financial focus of the airline is to return to positive adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) margins, even if business and long-haul international demand remain as much as a whopping 70% below 2019 levels.

On Monday, United announced new long-haul routes to Greece, Iceland, and Croatia, which will allow the airline to serve destinations open for vaccinated Americans and hopefully give the carrier a shot at capturing leisure travelers.

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United Boeing 767-300ER
United announced three new routes for summer 2021. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

United has had the largest long-haul international exposure in the industry and competes heavily for business travelers. As the crisis set in and those sectors of travel were decimated, there were concerns about how United’s exposure and positioning would impact the airline. United’s team knows that the outlook is still uncertain, but it is not giving up hope. The airline is preparing to return to positive net income, even if business and long-haul international demand only return to about 25% below 2019 levels.

A large part of United’s strategy has been to focus on ensuring its customers are satisfied and effectively compete for premium travelers. As part of that planning, the airline is pushing for a continuation of the Polaris retrofit program, starting retrofits on narrowbody aircraft, modernizing gates, upgrading and expanding lounges in Newark and Denver, and rolling out more digital tools.

United Boeing 787
United is not planning to pivot away from its international exposure massively. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

The short-term future

In the short term, United’s second quarter of 2021 will hopefully see an improvement from the first quarter. Based on current trends, the airline expects its second-quarter total revenue per available seat mile (TRASM) to be down approximately 20% versus the second quarter of 2019.

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The airline’s capacity for the quarter will be down 45% versus the same quarter in 2019. In May, United will fly roughly 52% of its full schedule that it flew in 2019. This includes plans for new and returning international and domestic flying that will start before the end of the second quarter in June.

United Boeing 737-800
United’s capacity will be down roughly 45% in the second quarter. Photo: Vincenzo Pace | Simple Flying

In the first quarter, United announced 41 new domestic routes and two new international routes. The airline also launched six domestic routes and four international routes, with 13 more international routes planned to launch in 2021. A key announcement from the first quarter was United’s intention to fly nonstop between Boston and London once travel between the US and UK returns, which could happen this summer.

What do you make of United’s first-quarter results and outlook? Let us know in the comments!

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/united-1q2021-net-loss/

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Sheep farmer vows to keep fighting RAAF noise even if it bankrupts her

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F-35As A35-015 and A35-016 after arriving at Williamtown on September 10. (Defence)
An F-35 Lightning II, A35-015, after arriving at Williamtown in 2019 (Defence)

The sheep farmer who lost a Supreme Court case against the RAAF for ignoring her “cease and desist” noise notice has vowed to appeal to the High Court.

“I might end up bankrupt trying but you have to try,” Julie Steepe said. “I don’t have a lot but what I have I ­protect. And it upsets me to see my sheep upset.”

Steepe last week argued in court that the RAAF owed her $15.3 million because aircraft flying over her farm at Bulahdelah, near RAAF Base Williamtown, were effectively trespassing on her land. She said it contravened her “lawful right to quiet enjoyment of my property” and issued the Air Force a notice to stop.

Speaking on The Australian on Tuesday, Steepe said aircraft – likely to include F-35s, Hawks and PC-9s – were scaring “the bejeezus” out of her sheep.

“They come out of nowhere, they dip down and locate my sheep, and try hard to fly directly over the top of them … You can‘t get away from them.”

Steepe told the newspaper she was able to represent herself in court using her own online research of obscure case law and a paper copy of the Constitution. She has vowed to appeal the ruling and said she will proceed to the High Court if she has to, arguing that she once counted more than 90 planes overhead in just a few hours.

She said it was as if the pilots had said, “Screw you lady, we’ll do whatever we like and you’re just a little sheep farmer from Bulahdelah and you can’t tell us what to do”.

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Last week, Australian Aviation reported how Steepe in 2020 issued the RAAF a series of invoices after the organisation didn’t comply with her order to “cease and desist”. The final notice stated it had seven days to show what lawful authority it had to “trespass” on her land.

“A breach of the border … will incur a fee of $AUD167,000 plus a further $AUD167,000 for each subsequent breach,” it said.

“This being compensation for breaching my lawful right to quiet enjoyment of my property, as well as my lawful right to the alienation of my property from the Crown.

“The border of my property extends to the centre of the earth and to the expanse of the universe.”

Unhappy with the response, Steepe took RAAF to the NSW Supreme Court, arguing the invoices now totalled $15.3 million.

She also sought an order to prevent further RAAF aircraft flying over her property.

However, Justice David Davies said in his ruling, “A landowner does not have any right arising from ownership of the land to prevent aircraft flying over their property, provided that it is at a height above that which is necessary for the ordinary use and enjoyment of the land and the structures upon it.

“The plaintiff submitted that she has a right to ‘quiet enjoyment of the land’, and that is interfered with by the noise of the aircraft. Any notion of quiet enjoyment is a matter between a landlord and a tenant, either as an implied or express condition of a lease.

“The word ‘quiet’ in those circumstances is not concerned with noise as such, but with a right to reside on the land without interruption, interference or disturbance by the landlord or grantor of the land. The only appropriate analogy for an owner of land in fee simple is that no other person has a right to trespass upon the land or, arguably, commit a nuisance on or onto the land.

“As will be seen below, matters of trespass and nuisance as far as aircraft are concerned, have been dealt with by statute. The plaintiff has no other ‘right’ of quiet enjoyment.”

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Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/04/sheep-farmer-vows-to-keep-fighting-raaf-noise-even-if-it-bankrupts-her/

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Boeing’s Air Force One Contractor Battle – What’s Happening?

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A run-of-the-mill dispute between a manufacturer and a supplier doesn’t normally make the news. But when the dispute involves future Air Force One aircraft, people sit up and pay attention. Earlier this month, Boeing sued a contractor doing work on its 747s destined to fly future Presidents. Just a few days ago, that contractor returned serve, countersuing Boeing.

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Boeing has sacked and is suing one of its Air Force One program contractors. Photo: Getty Images

Boeing sues GDC Technics

Three years ago, Boeing locked in a US$3.9 billion deal to build a pair of 747-8s for the United States Air Force. The deal got attention for two reasons. First, the aircraft would be among the last jumbo jets ever built by Boeing, Second, they would be going to the USAF’s 89th Airlift Wing who provides the US Government’s VIP flight service.

Boeing uses a variety of suppliers to help manufacture components and provide services when building planes. Among the suppliers on the Air Force One program is Texas-based GDC Technics. They are a global aerospace company with expertise in engineering and technical services, modifications, electronic systems, research and development, and MRO services. GDC Technics got contracts to design and build the interior of the two 747s.

Earlier this month, Boeing canceled the contracts and sued GDC Technics. Boeing said GDC Technics was 12 months behind schedules, and it had no choice but to cancel the contracts. Boeing cited GDC Technics’ “insolvency and failure to met contractual obligations.”

“GDC’s failures have resulted in millions of dollars in damages to Boeing and threaten to jeopardize work that is of critical importance to the USAF,” Boeing said in its complaint filed in Tarrant County’s District Court.

Air Force One
The current Air Force One fleet is set to be phased out by the middle of the decade. Photo: Getty Images

GDC Technics hit back, countersues Boeing

GDC Technics hit back late last week. On Friday, they countersued Boeing in Fort Worth, saying Boeing was making them a scapegoat for their own failures. GDC Technics is seeking US$20 million in damages. Reuters is reporting the counterclaim states;

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“Boeing’s mismanagement of the completion of two Air Force One presidential aircraft, not delays caused by GDC, that has caused a delay in the completion of those aircraft.

“Because of its problems with engineering, program management, and its own financial difficulties, Boeing has fallen behind in the project schedule for the aircraft. Boeing looked to GDC as a scapegoat to excuse its lack of performance on the aircraft to the United States Air Force.”

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GDC Technics also alleges Boeing failed in its contractual obligations to the subcontractors. That includes failing to pay what GDC Technics was due for its work.

Boeing says it will either bring the designing and building the interior of the future Air Force One planes in-house or find new suppliers.

Air Force One Boeing 747 Daytona 2020
Two Boeing VC-25A aircraft have made up the presidential fleet since 1990. Photo: Getty Images

GDC Technics has a track record delivering VIP fleet modifications

GDC Technics is no wannabe aircraft business batting out of its league with Boeing. The established company has a proven track record of modifying aircraft (including Boeings) for VIP and executive customers. Recently, they wrapped up exterior modifications and additional interior cabin customizations on one of two Boeing 777-300ERs going to the Indian Government. GDC Technics has also recently done work on Boeing Business Jets air purification systems and 737-300 wireless systems. But how much work Boeing refers to GDC Technics in the future is now up in the air.

The two 747-8s destined to go to the USAF are now at Boeing’s facility in San Antonio. Boeing says a variety of work is now underway to modify the planes and bring them up to USAF specs.

What do you make of this lawsuit? Who do you think is at fault? Post a comment and let us know.

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/boeing-air-force-one-battle/

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FAA To Require Checks Of All US Registered Boeing 787 Dreamliners

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Boeing’s 787 program has received another setback with news the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a new airworthiness directive. To take effect in early May, the directive applies to all Boeing 787s registered in the United States. The directive deals with the threat of decompression panels disengaging on the aircraft type.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
The FAA is extending an earlier airworthiness directive to now cover all US-registered 787 Dreamliners.
Photo: Boeing

The threat of decompression panels disengaging on Dreamliners

According to a FlightGlobal report, this airworthiness directive supplements a related directive issued in March. The FAA acted in response to reports of some decompression panels tearing in the 787’s bilge area.

Decompression panels separate the cargo area from the passenger area. They can open to act as pressure relief vents and allow a larger quantity of airflow into the cargo compartment. The concern is a leak in the bilge area could result in insufficient Halon concentrations to adequately control any fire in the aircraft’s cargo area. The airworthiness order will apply to all three models of the 787 Dreamliner operating in the United States.

In addition to several large aircraft leasing companies based there, big United States-based operators of Boeing’s 787 aircraft include American Airlines and United Airlines.

After overhauling quality control procedures, Boeing resumed delivering its 787s in March following a five-month break. In late March, a factory fresh 787-9 went to United Airlines. The pause in deliveries capped a tumultuous few years for the Dreamliner.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
United Airlines is one of the US airlines impacted by this airworthiness directive. Photo: Boeing

Last September, inspections found problems with the 787’s vertical stabilizer or tail fin. At the time, that issue threatened to impact at least 680 of the 981 Dreamliners in service worldwide. Before inspections uncovered this problem, several production issues related to improperly sized shims and aircraft skin flatness specifications had been made public.

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Around the same time the FAA began zeroing in on the decompression panel problems, Boeing also found the cockpit windows on some Dreamliners may not be up to standard. This discovery came after the outsourced manufacturer of the windows changed its production process.

Last month, the FAA issued its first airworthiness directive concerning the 787’s decompression panels. That directive mandated repetitive visual inspection of the bilge barriers located in the forward and aft cargo compartments to look for disengaged or damaged decompression panels. Any disengaged panels were to be reinstalled. Damaged panels were to be replaced.  This first directive targeted around 220 Dreamliners. The FAA estimated that each inspection cycle would cost US$56,610.

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Since then, the FAA has received fresh information that more 787 aircraft may have problems with their decompression panels. With this latest airworthiness directive, the FAA expands to inspections from a certain number of 787 Dreamliners to all 787 Dreamliners registered in the United States.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
Boeing has experienced a litany of production problems with the 787 Dreamliner. Photo: Boeing

Boeing notes no imminent safety threat posed, welcomes FAA directive

Boeing notes the flagged potential problems with the decompression panels do not pose an immediate safety hazard.

“Per our standard process, we proactively notified the FAA and our customers when we discovered this issue,” Boeing told Simple Flying when the FAA issued its earlier airworthiness directive.

“We determined then that this was not an immediate safety of flight issue, and that remains the determination. We recommended increased inspection and replacement of components as necessary, and we have worked on redesigning the part. Boeing fully supports the FAA’s Airworthiness Directive as the requirements are consistent with the guidance that we provided to 787 operators.”

What’s your opinion? Is the FAA right to expand compression panel inspections to cover all 787s registered in the United States? Post a comment and let us know.

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/faa-boeing-787-dreamliner-checks/

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