Connect with us

Nano Technology

Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale

Published

on

Home > Press > Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale

Snapshot from MD simulation of graphene on liquid Cu CREDIT
Santiago Cingolani.
Snapshot from MD simulation of graphene on liquid Cu CREDIT
Santiago Cingolani.

Abstract:
Graphene may be among the most exciting scientific discoveries of the last century. While it is strikingly familiar to us–graphene is considered an allotrope of carbon, meaning that it essentially the same substance as graphite but in a different atomic structure–graphene also opened up a new world of possibilities for designing and building new technologies.

Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale


Bonn, Germany | Posted on June 4th, 2021

The material is two-dimensional, meaning that each “sheet” of graphene is only 1 atom thick, but its bonds make it as strong as some of the world’s hardest metal alloys while remaining lightweight and flexible. This valuable, unique mix of properties have piqued the interest of scientists from a wide range of fields, leading to research in using graphene for next-generation electronics, new coatings on industrial instruments and tools, and new biomedical technologies.

It is perhaps graphene’s immense potential that has consequently caused one of its biggest challenges–graphene is difficult to produce in large volumes, and demand for the material is continually growing. Recent research indicates that using a liquid copper catalyst may be a fast, efficient way for producing graphene, but researchers only have a limited understanding of molecular interactions happening during these brief, chaotic moments that lead to graphene formation, meaning they cannot yet use the method to reliably produce flawless graphene sheets.

In order to address these challenges and help develop methods for quicker graphene production, a team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has been using the JUWELS and SuperMUC-NG high-performance computing (HPC) systems at the Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) and Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) to run high-resolution simulations of graphene formation on liquid copper.

A window into experiment

Graphene’s appeal primarily stems from the material’s perfectly uniform crystal structure, meaning that producing graphene with impurities is wasted effort. For laboratory settings or circumstances where only a small amount of graphene is needed, researchers can place a piece of scotch tape onto a graphite crystal and “peel” away atomic layers of the graphite using a technique that resembles how one would use tape or another adhesive to help remove pet hair from clothing. While this reliably produces flawless graphene layers, the process is slow and impractical for creating graphene for large-scale applications.

Industry requires methods that could reliably produce high-quality graphene cheaper and faster. One of the more promising methods being investigated involves using a liquid metal catalyst to facilitate the self-assembly of carbon atoms from molecular precursors into a single graphene sheet growing on top of the liquid metal. While the liquid offers the ability to scale up graphene production efficiently, it also introduces a host of complications, such as the high temperatures required to melt the typical metals used, such as copper. When designing new materials, researchers use experiments to see how atoms interact under a variety of conditions. While technological advances have opened up new ways for gaining insight into atomic-scale behavior even under extreme conditions such as very high temperatures, experimental techniques do not always allow researchers to observe the ultra-fast reactions that facilitate the correct changes to a material’s atomic structure (or what aspects of the reaction may have introduced impurities). This is where computer simulations can be of help, however, simulating the behavior of a dynamic system such as a liquid is not without its own set of complications.

“The problem describing anything like this is you need to apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to get the right sampling,” Andersen said. “Then, of course, there is the system size–you need to have a large enough system to accurately simulate the behavior of the liquid.” Unlike experiments, molecular dynamics simulations offer researchers the ability to look at events happening on the atomic scale from a variety of different angles or pause the simulation to focus on different aspects.

While MD simulations offer researchers insights into the movement of individual atoms and chemical reactions that could not be observed during experiments, they do have their own challenges. Chief among them is the compromise between accuracy and cost–when relying on accurate ab initio methods to drive the MD simulations, it is extremely computationally expensive to get simulations that are large enough and last long enough to accurately model these reactions in a meaningful way.

Andersen and her colleagues used about 2,500 cores on JUWELS in periods stretching over more than one month for the recent simulations. Despite the massive computational effort, the team could still only simulate around 1,500 atoms over picoseconds of time. While these may sound like modest numbers, these simulations were among the largest done of ab initio MD simulations of graphene on liquid copper. The team uses these highly accurate simulations to help develop cheaper methods to drive the MD simulations so that it becomes possible to simulate larger systems and longer timescales without compromising the accuracy.

Strengthening links in the chain

The team published its record-breaking simulation work in the Journal of Chemical Physics, then used those simulations to compare with experimental data obtained in their most recent paper, which appeared in ACS Nano.

Andersen indicated that current-generation supercomputers, such as JUWELS and SuperMUC-NG, enabled the team to run its simulation. Next generation machines, however, would open up even more possibilities, as researchers could more rapidly simulate larger numbers or systems over longer periods of time.

Andersen received her PhD in 2014, and indicated that graphene research has exploded during the same period. “It is fascinating that the material is such a recent research focus–it is almost encapsulated in my own scientific career that people have looked closely at it,” she said. Despite the need for more research into using liquid catalysts to produce graphene, Andersen indicated that the two-pronged approach of using both HPC and experiment would be essential to further graphene’s development and, in turn, use in commercial and industrial applications. “In this research, there is a great interplay between theory and experiment, and I have been on both sides of this research,” she said.

###

Funding for JUWELS and SuperMUC-NG was provided by the Bavarian State Ministry of Science and the Arts, the Ministry of Culture and Research of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research through the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Eric Gedenk
49-163-790-2953

Copyright © Gauss Centre for Supercomputing

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Quantum holds the key to secure conference calls June 6th, 2021

An atom chip interferometer that could detect quantum gravity June 4th, 2021

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Graphene/ Graphite

Conductive, durable coatings with graphene nanotubes now available to the Turkish market June 3rd, 2021

Hexagonal boron nitride’s remarkable toughness unmasked: 2D material resists cracking and description by century-old theory of fracture mechanics June 2nd, 2021

Graphene key for novel hardware security May 10th, 2021

Oregon scientists create mechanism to precisely control soundwaves in metamaterials: Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise stoppage and reversal of sound pulses April 16th, 2021

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Hexagonal boron nitride’s remarkable toughness unmasked: 2D material resists cracking and description by century-old theory of fracture mechanics June 2nd, 2021

Researchers build structured, multi-part nanocrystals with super light-emitting properties May 28th, 2021

Possible Futures

Quantum holds the key to secure conference calls June 6th, 2021

An atom chip interferometer that could detect quantum gravity June 4th, 2021

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Discoveries

Quantum holds the key to secure conference calls June 6th, 2021

An atom chip interferometer that could detect quantum gravity June 4th, 2021

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Hexagonal boron nitride’s remarkable toughness unmasked: 2D material resists cracking and description by century-old theory of fracture mechanics June 2nd, 2021

A novel nitrogen-doped dual-emission carbon dots as an effective fluorescent probe for ratiometric detection dopamine June 1st, 2021

Researchers build structured, multi-part nanocrystals with super light-emitting properties May 28th, 2021

Announcements

Quantum holds the key to secure conference calls June 6th, 2021

An atom chip interferometer that could detect quantum gravity June 4th, 2021

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Quantum holds the key to secure conference calls June 6th, 2021

An atom chip interferometer that could detect quantum gravity June 4th, 2021

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Luminaries: Steven DenBaars and John Bowers receive top recognition at Compound Semiconductor Week conference May 21st, 2021

Hanging by a thread: Imaging and probing chains of single atoms: Scientists develop a method to visualize monoatomic chains and measure the strength and conductance of single-atom bonds May 14th, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56702

Nano Technology

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered

Published

on

Home > Press > New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered

Yellow isosurfaces on left panel indicate electrons localized in-between the C3 trimers. Ionized structure on the right has no trapped electrons, and some of the M atoms have been largely displaced. This displacement of the M atoms again significantly stabilizes the ionized structure. CREDIT
Soungmin Bae and Hannes Raebiger
Yellow isosurfaces on left panel indicate electrons localized in-between the C3 trimers. Ionized structure on the right has no trapped electrons, and some of the M atoms have been largely displaced. This displacement of the M atoms again significantly stabilizes the ionized structure. CREDIT
Soungmin Bae and Hannes Raebiger

Abstract:
An exploratory investigation into the behavior of materials with desirable electric properties resulted in the discovery of a structural phase of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The new family of materials are electrides, wherein electrons occupy a space usually reserved for atoms or ions instead of orbiting the nucleus of an atom or ion. The stable, low-energy, tunable materials could have potential applications in nanotechnologies.

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered


Yokohama, Japan | Posted on June 11th, 2021

The international research team, led by Hannes Raebiger, associate professor in the Department of Physics at Yokohama National University in Japan, published their results on June 10th as frontispiece in Advanced Functional Materials.

Initially, the team set out to better understand the fundamental properties of a 2D system known as Sc2CO2. Containing two atoms of metallic scandium, one atom of carbon and two atoms of oxygens, the system belongs to a family of chemical compounds collectively referred to as MXenes. They are typically composed of a carbon or nitrogen layer one atom thick sandwiched between metal layers, dotted with oxygen or fluorine atoms.

The researchers were particularly interested in MXene Sc2CO2 due to the predictions that, when structured into a hexagonal phase, the system would have desired electrical properties.

“Despite these fascinating predictions of hexagonal phases of Sc2CO2, we are not aware of its successful fabrication as of yet,” said Soungmin Bae, first author and researcher in the Department of Physics at Yokohama National University. “Analyzing its fundamental properties, we discovered a completely new structural phase.”

The new structural phase results in new electride materials. The atomic-thin 2D structural phase is described as tiled shapes forming the central carbon plane. The previously predicted shape was a hexagon, with a carbon atom at every vertex and one in the middle. The new materials have a rhombus-like shape, with electrons at the vertices and a carbon trimer — three carbon atoms in a row — in the middle.

“Carbon is one of the most common materials on our planet, and quite important for living beings, but it is hardly ever found as trimers,” Raebiger said. “The closest place where carbon trimers are typically found is interstellar space.”

The overall shape is less symmetric than the previously described hexagonal structure, but it is more symmetric with regard to the central plane. This structure offers unique characteristics due to the appearance of the new family of electrides, according to Raebiger.

“Electrides contain electrons as a structural unit and often are extremely good electrical conductors,” Raebiger said. “The present family of electrides are insulators, and while most insulators can be made conductive by adding or removing electrons, these materials simply become more insulating.”

MXenes are particularly attractive as a material, because they can be reconfigured with other metallic elements to offer a cornucopia of properties, including tunable conductivity, various forms of magnetism, and/or accelerate chemical reactions as catalysts. On top of this, they are ultra-thin sheets only a few atoms thick, that is, 2D materials. The newly discovered electrides have electrons in lattice voids between atoms and ions, which can be readily emitted into surrounding space, such as the electron sources for large particle accelerators, as well as be borrowed to catalyze a specifically desired chemical reaction.

“We made this discovery because we wanted to understand how these materials work better,” Bae said. “If you encounter something you don’t understand, dig deeper.”

Co-authors include William Espinosa-García and Gustavo M. Dalpian, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Brazil; Yoon-Gu Kang and Myung Joon Han, Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Juho Lee and Yong-Hoon Kim, Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Noriyuki Egawa, Kazuaki Kuwahata and Kaoru Ohno, Department of Physics at Yokohama National University; and Mohammad Khazaei and Hideo Hosono, Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology. Espinosa-García is also affiliated with Grupo de investigación en Modelamienot y Simulación Computacional, Facultad de Ingenierías, Universidad de San Buenaventura-Medellín.

The Iwaki Scholarship Foundation; São Paulo Research Foundation; Korea’s National Research Foundation, Ministry of Science and ICT and Ministry of Education; KAIST (formerly the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology); and Samsung Research Funding & Incubation Center of Samsung Electronics funded this work.

####

About Yokohama National University
Yokohama National University (YNU or Yokokoku) is a Japanese national university founded in 1949. YNU provides students with a practical education utilizing the wide expertise of its faculty and facilitates engagement with the global community. YNU’s strength in the academic research of practical application sciences leads to high-impact publications and contributes to international scientific research and the global society.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Akiko Tsumura

Copyright © Yokohama National University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Possible Futures

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Discoveries

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

Researchers turned transparent calcite into artificial gold June 11th, 2021

Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Announcements

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Research partnerships

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

Hexagonal boron nitride’s remarkable toughness unmasked: 2D material resists cracking and description by century-old theory of fracture mechanics June 2nd, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56714

Continue Reading

Nano Technology

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells

Published

on

Home > Press > Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells

The team fabricated an organic solar cell that, unlike conventional solar cells, can be easily recycled following the simple steps shown above. Adapted from Lin et al. (2021)
The team fabricated an organic solar cell that, unlike conventional solar cells, can be easily recycled following the simple steps shown above. Adapted from Lin et al. (2021)

Abstract:
An electrode coating just one molecule thick can significantly enhance the performance of an organic photovoltaic cell, KAUST researchers have found. The coating outperforms the leading material currently used for this task and may pave the way for improvements in other devices that rely on organic molecules, such as light-emitting diodes and photodetectors.

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells


Thuwal, Saudi Arabia | Posted on June 11th, 2021

Unlike the most common photovoltaic cells that use crystalline silicon to harvest light, organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) rely on a light-absorbing layer of carbon-based molecules. Although OPVs cannot yet rival the performance of silicon cells, they could be easier and cheaper to manufacture at a very large scale using printing techniques.

When light enters a photovoltaic cell, its energy frees a negative electron and leaves behind a positive gap, known as a hole. Different materials then gather the electrons and holes and guide them to different electrodes to generate an electrical current. In OPVs, a material called PEDOT:PSS is widely used to ease the transfer of generated holes into an electrode; however, PEDOT:PSS is expensive, acidic and can degrade the cell’s performance over time.

The KAUST team has now developed a better alternative to PEDOT:PSS. They use a much thinner coating of a hole-transporting molecule called Br-2PACz, which binds to an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode to form a single-molecule layer. The organic cell using Br-2PACz achieved a power conversion efficiency of 18.4 percent, whereas an equivalent cell using PEDOT:PSS reached only 17.5 percent.

“We were very surprised indeed by the performance enhancement,” says Yuanbao Lin, Ph.D. student and member of the team. “We believe Br-2PACz has the potential to replace PEDOT:PSS due to its low cost and high performance.”

Br-2PACz increased the cell’s efficiency in several ways. Compared with its rival, it caused less electrical resistance, improved hole transport and allowed more light to shine through to the absorbing layer. Br-2PACz also improved the structure of the light-absorbing layer itself, an effect that may be related to the coating process.

The coating could even improve the recyclability of the solar cell. The researchers found that the ITO electrode could be removed from the cell, stripped of its coating and then reused as if it was new. In contrast, PEDOT:PSS roughens the surface of the ITO so that it performs poorly if reused in another cell. “We anticipate this will have a dramatic impact on both the economics of OPVs and the environment,” says Thomas Anthopoulos, who led the research.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael Cusack

Copyright © King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Organic Electronics

Light-emitting tattoo engineered for the first time: Scientists at UCL and the IIT -Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) have created a temporary tattoo with light-emitting technology used in TV and smartphone screens, paving the way for a new type of March 4th, 2021

Going Organic: uOttawa team realizing the limitless possibilities of wearable electronics January 28th, 2021

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers January 8th, 2021

HKU Engineering team develops novel miniaturised organic semiconductor: An important breakthrough essential for future flexible electronic devices October 8th, 2020

Possible Futures

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Discoveries

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Rice lab peers inside 2D crystal synthesis: Simulations could help molecular engineers enhance creation of semiconducting nanomaterials June 11th, 2021

Announcements

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Rice lab peers inside 2D crystal synthesis: Simulations could help molecular engineers enhance creation of semiconducting nanomaterials June 11th, 2021

Energy

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Researchers build structured, multi-part nanocrystals with super light-emitting properties May 28th, 2021

Emergence of a new heteronanostructure library May 14th, 2021

Less innocent than it looks: Hydrogen in hybrid perovskites: Researchers identify the defect that limits solar-cell performance April 30th, 2021

Solar/Photovoltaic

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Researchers build structured, multi-part nanocrystals with super light-emitting properties May 28th, 2021

Harvesting light like nature does:Synthesizing a new class of bio-inspired, light-capturing nanomaterials May 14th, 2021

Less innocent than it looks: Hydrogen in hybrid perovskites: Researchers identify the defect that limits solar-cell performance April 30th, 2021

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56711

Continue Reading

Nano Technology

Researchers turned transparent calcite into artificial gold

Published

on

Home > Press > Researchers turned transparent calcite into artificial gold

Figure shows 3D reconstruction of the golden vaterite and the laser-induced heating of the spherulites. CREDIT
Tel Aviv University
Figure shows 3D reconstruction of the golden vaterite and the laser-induced heating of the spherulites. CREDIT
Tel Aviv University

Abstract:
Breakthrough in metamaterials: for the first time in the world, researchers at Tel Aviv University developed an innovative nanotechnology that transforms a transparent calcite nanoparticle into a sparkling gold-like particle. In other words, they turned the transparent particle into a particle that is visible despite its very small dimensions. According to the researchers the new material can serve as a platform for innovative cancer treatments.

Researchers turned transparent calcite into artificial gold


Tel Aviv, Israel | Posted on June 11th, 2021

In a new paper published in Advanced Materials, an international team of scientists, coordinated by Dr. Roman Noskov and Dr. Pavel Ginzburg from the Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering at Tel Aviv University, Prof. Dmitry Gorin from the Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) and Dr. Evgeny Shirshin from M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, has introduced the concept of biofriendly delivery of optical resonances via a mesoscopic metamaterial, a material with properties that are not found in nature. This approach opens promising prospects for multifunctionality in biomedical systems, allowing the use of a single designer-made nanoparticle for sensing, photothermal therapy, photoacoustic tomography, bioimaging, and targeted drug delivery.

“This concept is the result of cross-disciplinary thinking at the interface between the physics of metamaterials and bioorganic chemistry, aiming to meet the needs of nanomedicine. We were able to create a mesoscopic submicron metamaterial from biocompatible components that demonstrates strong Mie resonances covering the near-infrared spectral window in which biological tissues are transparent,” says Dr. Roman Noskov.

The nanostructures capable of nanoscale light localization as well as performing several functions are highly desirable in a plethora of biomedical applications. However, biocompatibility is typically a problem, as engineering of optical properties often calls for using toxic compounds and chemicals. The researchers have resolved this issue by employing gold nanoseeds and porous vaterite (calcium carbonate) spherulites, currently considered promising drug-delivery vehicles. This approach involves controllable infusion of gold nanoseeds into a vaterite scaffold resulting in a mesoscopic metamaterial – golden vaterite – whose resonance properties can be widely tuned by changing the quantity of gold inside the vaterite. Additionally, high payload capacity of vaterite spherulites allows simultaneous loading of both drugs and fluorescent tags. To exemplify the performance of their system, the researchers demonstrated efficient laser heating of golden vaterite at red and near?infrared wavelengths, highly desirable in photothermal therapy, and photoacoustic tomography.

Prof. Pavel Ginzburg summarizes: “This novel platform enables the accommodation of multiple functionalities – as simple add-ons that can be introduced almost on demand. Alongside optical imaging and thermotherapy, MRI visibility, functional biomedical materials and many other modalities can be introduced within a miniature nano-scale particle. I believe that our collaborative efforts will lead to in-vivo demonstrations, which will pave the way for a new biomedical technology.”

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Noga Shahar
054-770-5223

Copyright © Tel Aviv University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Cancer

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique: Presentations at Photonics West 2021 Show How Early-Stage Imaging System’s Flexibility Can Be Applied Broadly in Medical Field March 18th, 2021

Nanothermometry to improve anticancer strategies February 10th, 2021

Nanoparticle drug delivery technique shows promise for treating pancreatic cancer: Method may also work for breast, prostate, ovarian cancer January 29th, 2021

Possible Futures

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Discoveries

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered June 11th, 2021

Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Announcements

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56712

Continue Reading

Nano Technology

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered

Published

on

Home > Press > New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered

Yellow isosurfaces on left panel indicate electrons localized in-between the C3 trimers. Ionized structure on the right has no trapped electrons, and some of the M atoms have been largely displaced. This displacement of the M atoms again significantly stabilizes the ionized structure. CREDIT
Soungmin Bae and Hannes Raebiger
Yellow isosurfaces on left panel indicate electrons localized in-between the C3 trimers. Ionized structure on the right has no trapped electrons, and some of the M atoms have been largely displaced. This displacement of the M atoms again significantly stabilizes the ionized structure. CREDIT
Soungmin Bae and Hannes Raebiger

Abstract:
An exploratory investigation into the behavior of materials with desirable electric properties resulted in the discovery of a structural phase of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The new family of materials are electrides, wherein electrons occupy a space usually reserved for atoms or ions instead of orbiting the nucleus of an atom or ion. The stable, low-energy, tunable materials could have potential applications in nanotechnologies.

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered


Yokohama, Japan | Posted on June 11th, 2021

The international research team, led by Hannes Raebiger, associate professor in the Department of Physics at Yokohama National University in Japan, published their results on June 10th as frontispiece in Advanced Functional Materials.

Initially, the team set out to better understand the fundamental properties of a 2D system known as Sc2CO2. Containing two atoms of metallic scandium, one atom of carbon and two atoms of oxygens, the system belongs to a family of chemical compounds collectively referred to as MXenes. They are typically composed of a carbon or nitrogen layer one atom thick sandwiched between metal layers, dotted with oxygen or fluorine atoms.

The researchers were particularly interested in MXene Sc2CO2 due to the predictions that, when structured into a hexagonal phase, the system would have desired electrical properties.

“Despite these fascinating predictions of hexagonal phases of Sc2CO2, we are not aware of its successful fabrication as of yet,” said Soungmin Bae, first author and researcher in the Department of Physics at Yokohama National University. “Analyzing its fundamental properties, we discovered a completely new structural phase.”

The new structural phase results in new electride materials. The atomic-thin 2D structural phase is described as tiled shapes forming the central carbon plane. The previously predicted shape was a hexagon, with a carbon atom at every vertex and one in the middle. The new materials have a rhombus-like shape, with electrons at the vertices and a carbon trimer — three carbon atoms in a row — in the middle.

“Carbon is one of the most common materials on our planet, and quite important for living beings, but it is hardly ever found as trimers,” Raebiger said. “The closest place where carbon trimers are typically found is interstellar space.”

The overall shape is less symmetric than the previously described hexagonal structure, but it is more symmetric with regard to the central plane. This structure offers unique characteristics due to the appearance of the new family of electrides, according to Raebiger.

“Electrides contain electrons as a structural unit and often are extremely good electrical conductors,” Raebiger said. “The present family of electrides are insulators, and while most insulators can be made conductive by adding or removing electrons, these materials simply become more insulating.”

MXenes are particularly attractive as a material, because they can be reconfigured with other metallic elements to offer a cornucopia of properties, including tunable conductivity, various forms of magnetism, and/or accelerate chemical reactions as catalysts. On top of this, they are ultra-thin sheets only a few atoms thick, that is, 2D materials. The newly discovered electrides have electrons in lattice voids between atoms and ions, which can be readily emitted into surrounding space, such as the electron sources for large particle accelerators, as well as be borrowed to catalyze a specifically desired chemical reaction.

“We made this discovery because we wanted to understand how these materials work better,” Bae said. “If you encounter something you don’t understand, dig deeper.”

Co-authors include William Espinosa-García and Gustavo M. Dalpian, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Brazil; Yoon-Gu Kang and Myung Joon Han, Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Juho Lee and Yong-Hoon Kim, Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Noriyuki Egawa, Kazuaki Kuwahata and Kaoru Ohno, Department of Physics at Yokohama National University; and Mohammad Khazaei and Hideo Hosono, Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology. Espinosa-García is also affiliated with Grupo de investigación en Modelamienot y Simulación Computacional, Facultad de Ingenierías, Universidad de San Buenaventura-Medellín.

The Iwaki Scholarship Foundation; São Paulo Research Foundation; Korea’s National Research Foundation, Ministry of Science and ICT and Ministry of Education; KAIST (formerly the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology); and Samsung Research Funding & Incubation Center of Samsung Electronics funded this work.

####

About Yokohama National University
Yokohama National University (YNU or Yokokoku) is a Japanese national university founded in 1949. YNU provides students with a practical education utilizing the wide expertise of its faculty and facilitates engagement with the global community. YNU’s strength in the academic research of practical application sciences leads to high-impact publications and contributes to international scientific research and the global society.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Akiko Tsumura

Copyright © Yokohama National University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Possible Futures

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Discoveries

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

Researchers turned transparent calcite into artificial gold June 11th, 2021

Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Announcements

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green to Appear at the Online NSS International Space Development Conference 2021: This Year’s Virtual Conference Streams Free to ALL June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

Researchers tame silicon to interact with light for next-generation microelectronics June 11th, 2021

Researchers take quantum encryption out of the lab: Field trial shows simple QKD system works with existing telecommunication network in Italy June 11th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Research partnerships

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

Hexagonal boron nitride’s remarkable toughness unmasked: 2D material resists cracking and description by century-old theory of fracture mechanics June 2nd, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56714

Continue Reading
Esports4 days ago

Genshin Impact Echoing Conch Locations Guide

Esports4 days ago

MLB The Show 21 Kitchen Sink 2 Pack: Base Round Revealed

Aviation3 days ago

The Story Of The Boeing 777 Family

zephyrnet4 days ago

7th Global Blockchain Congress by Agora Group & TDeFi on June 21st and 22nd, 2021, Dubai.

Esports4 days ago

Free boxes and skins up for grabs in Brawl Stars to celebrate one-year anniversary of China release

Crowdfunding3 days ago

April/May 2021 Top Campaigns

Blockchain4 days ago

Woonkly will be the official Title Sponsor of the 7th edition Global Blockchain Congress organized by Agora Group in Dubai

Big Data4 days ago

.NET DEVELOPMENT

Blockchain4 days ago

Death Cross is Appearing Over Bitcoin Price Chart

Blockchain4 days ago

Bitcoin (BTC) Officially a Legal Tender in El Salvador

Blockchain3 days ago

Crypto Fund Manager Says Bitcoin ETFs to be Approved By 2022

Crowdfunding4 days ago

US Fintech Broadridge Partners with Amazon Web Services to Expand Private Market Hub, Leveraging DLT

Big Data4 days ago

China arrests over 1,100 suspects in crackdown on crypto-related money laundering

Gaming4 days ago

TrustDice Review: Features & Promotions

Cleantech4 days ago

TC Energy Cancels Keystone XL Pipeline

Energy2 days ago

Industrial robots market in the automotive industry | $ 3.97 billion growth expected during 2021-2025 | 17000+ Technavio Research Reports

Cyber Security2 days ago

Data Breach that Impacted Both Audi of America and Volkswagen of America

Esports3 days ago

Every new Passive Power in Legends of Runeterra Lab of Legends 2.9.0

Fintech3 days ago

PayPal launches PayPal Rewards Card in Australia

Energy2 days ago

Daiki Axis Co., Ltd. (4245, First Section, Tokyo Stock Exchange) Overview of Operating Performance for the First Three Months Ended March 31, 2021

Trending