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UK police warn of sextortion attempts in intimate online dating chats

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As politicians play whack-a-mole with COVID-19 infection rates and try to balance the economic damage caused by lockdowns, stay-at-home orders have also impacted those out there in the dating scene. 

No longer able to meet up for a drink, a coffee, or now even a walk in the park, organizing an encounter with anyone other than your household or support bubble is banned and can result in a fine in the United Kingdom — and this includes both dates and overnight stays. 

Therefore, the only feasible option available is online connections, by way of social networks or dating apps. 

Dating is hard enough at the best of times but sexual desire doesn’t disappear just because you are cooped up at home. Realizing this, a number of healthcare organizations worldwide have urged us not to contribute to the spread of COVID-19 by meeting up with others for discreet sex outside of our social bubbles, bringing new meaning to the phrase, “You are your safest sex partner.”

This doesn’t mean, however, that we’ve abandoned the search in the time of a pandemic; instead, dating apps — such as Tinder, eHarmony, and the new Quarantine Together — are signing up users in record numbers. 

Apps and chats over Zoom, however, can only go so far and after you’ve made your way through remote small talk, what’s next?

If you’re not careful, it’s blackmail. 

In a recent case documented by the UK’s Thames Valley police, a sextortion scam started innocently enough: a young man was contacted over Facebook by a woman who wanted to video chat. 

They talked twice online and the woman asked him to show off his body. While no “intimate” acts took place in the first online session, the police say, the second chat was another story — and the intimate footage he provided was then covertly recorded by the scam artist. 

She then told her victim that their online session had been recorded and demanded £200 ($270) on pain of it being sent to all of his family and friends, now available to her through the Facebook connection. 

The man refused, but over the next two hours, he received over 100 demands for payment. Eventually, he appeared to cave in — but instead blocked her and deactivated all of his accounts before contacting law enforcement. 

Thames Valley asks for us to “not do anything silly” online, but this case — as it goes, a small fish in a large phishing pond and one in which the young man escaped from the net — still highlights how careful we need to be now about sharing intimate footage or allowing the opportunity for it to be taken online without our permission. 

Sextortion is not a new concept, and unfortunately, the internet has provided a lucrative arena for people trying to extort money, sexual acts, services, or images from others. Some of the most common forms of sextortion are:

  • Phishing emails: Messages claim to have seen your web history or pornographic website visits, and may also say that ‘hackers’ accessed your webcam and recorded you. 
  • Phishing emails containing known passwords: The same, but with the addition of passwords used by you to access online accounts that may have been leaked in a data breach to try and appear more legitimate.
  • Revenge porn: Threats to release intimate photos or videos online, sometimes by ex-partners or other people you know. 
  • Internet of Things: Nest and Ring devices have been compromised to recycle old tactics and convince victims that hackers have illicit recordings of them. 

Emotional triggers are the key: humiliation, fear, worry of friends, family, or co-workers finding out or viewing footage, and the concern of the future impact such material could have on your life. 

A report conducted by Thorn and the Crimes Against Children Research Center (CCRC) estimates that in 45% of cases where a perpetrator has access to sensitive material, they will carry out their threat. 

After all, it’s not them who face humiliation.

With this in mind, it’s time to reconsider just what risks we are comfortable taking online, lockdown or not. Sextortion can be devastating but there’s no guarantee that a scammer will delete footage they have obtained after you’ve paid up — and may simply demand more and more from you.

“Anybody who is threatened with this type of blackmail by an online contact is advised to contact the police and should refuse to send the scammer any money,” commented Ray Walsh, Digital Privacy Expert at ProPrivacy. “Once a scammer knows that a victim is willing to pay they will only double down and ask for more. For this reason, it is vital that you contact the police and refuse to pay.”

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/uk-police-warn-of-sextortion-attempts-in-intimate-online-dating-chats/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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Fastest VPN in 2021: How we rated the top services

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Choosing a VPN can be a little bit of a chore. First, you’re going to need to research and figure out which VPN is going to work for you. Then you’re going to want to go through a trial run. But then the real test comes, you need to see how fast that trial goes with your internet once the VPN is set up to your machine and your network. Beth Mauder sits down with David Gewirtz to talk about the research and legwork David has done to come up with the fastest VPN on the market.

Watch my conversation with Gewirtz above, or read a few of the highlights below.


Beth Mauder: Why don’t you go ahead and walk us through what those tests look like?

David Gewirtz: So there’s a variety of ways to figure this thing out, but remember that everybody’s VPN is going to be a little different because you’re in a different location. You’re on the East Coast, for example, I’m on the West Coast. People are in different countries and they’re usually using VPNs to move them to yet other countries. So your performance is going to be a little different.

From my set of tests, and I tested five VPNs over the course of about two weeks, I started with a raw Windows install, so that everything was consistent across each individual test. And then for each install, what I would do is do tests to a variety of countries, and when possible, repeat the vendor, the ISP in each of those countries. So I tried India, and Sweden, and Taiwan, and Russia, and either Australia or New Zealand, and tried to get out to those countries for each of the VPNs I tested. And then tested upload speed, download speed, and latency and ping time.

I also tested how long it takes to establish the connection because it turns out that some of them take quite a bit longer to connect to the VPN than others. And that can get annoying, especially if you’re connecting on and off in different places. So that was the sum total of the test. So what I did is I repeated them three times for each test, and then I averaged the results to try to get some level of consistency. And it’s a pretty rote process. You just set it up and you run the tests and you record the numbers and put them together into, in my case, a big spreadsheet, which then got turned into charts, which were a lot more fun.

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Beth Mauder: David, after all of your testing, what were some of the fastest VPNs you can currently get?

David Gewirtz: So I was very surprised. The fastest VPN for download that I found was a product called Hotspot Shield. And what surprised me about Hotspot Shield is they were very hypey in their promotion. They were the kind of company that you didn’t expect to live up to their promises because they were just so full of words, “The best, we’re the greatest, love us, best thing since sliced bread.” It turned out they were substantially faster. And actually, most of my performance to other countries was faster than it was with a direct connection to the other country. So that was an outlier. I was very surprised by that. Then we had CyberGhost was pretty quick. NordVPN was quick. Then StrongVPN and IPVanish wrapped up the set of the five that I did in my own testing.

And I also aggregated tests from around the internet. And that gave me a much better picture. And I’ll talk about that in a second. But from my own personal tests of those five, Hotspot Shield, CyberGhost, and NordVPN were the fastest for download speeds. In terms of ping time, CyberGhost and  NordVPN were the winners for how long it just took to send one signal to the remote site and get it back. That’s what ping time is. It’s I touch that site, I get back a response, and that’s a very quick response. And then time to connect, NordVPN and CyberGhost were slowest, and Hotspot ShieldIPVanish, and StrongVPN were the fastest.

So we’re looking at a range from about two seconds to 16 seconds per connection. So you push your little button and you start to connect and you wait, and you wait, and you wait, and you wait, and then you get your connection. If you’re doing this a lot, if you’re going from airport location to airport location each time you’re reconnecting, then you want the one with the fastest ping connection. If you’re doing it once for your day, then you don’t really care.

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Beth Mauder: So you said you looked at other sites too, and you aggregated data from elsewhere. Were your tests confirmed? Did you look for something else? What’d you find?

David Gewirtz: One of the things I did was I looked at 10 sites besides ZDNet, and most of them had lists of their top 10 or so VPNs. I eliminated anyone that only had one VPN reviewed or two VPN review because I wanted to see performance across the world. And the purpose of looking at these sites was that every testing, every site that did these tests was in a different location doing different performance. So if we were able to look at each of these different sites, and then see what was consistent across all their results, we’d get a better picture. So what we found was that ExpressVPNNordVPN, and Hotspot Shield were the top three across all of the sites we looked at. But what was interesting was what’s called the standard deviation, which is the difference between the results, your how many highs and how many lows you have.

It turned out that NordVPN’s difference was very low. They were mostly ones and twos, where Hotspot Shield had a bunch of ones and a bunch of sixes. So what that tells me is that that performance is consistent in certain locations, but not consistent in other locations. And the same applies to a few of the others. So what we found was that if you’re looking for the truest, most consistent set of results across all 10 plus ZDNet sites, then NordVPN was the fastest and the most consistent. If you’re looking for what was just the fastest, but not as consistent across all the test points, then Hotspot Shield showed up pretty well as did  ExpressVPN.

So from that, what do you take out of it? Well, the fact is almost all of these companies have 30 to 45-day money-back guarantees. And the reality is your mileage is going to be different from everybody else’s. Your mileage may vary. So what you really need to take out of this is you need to test it in that 30 to 45 days and find out how it performed for you, especially if you’re just at home and you’re working from home, then that’s easy. But if you’re traveling between home and office, or you’re going to your favorite coffee shop, if they still exist, or you’re going to the airport and you’re allowed to do that, you should test in those environments because that’s the kind of environment you’re working in, and see whether you’re getting the numbers you need. Because really, the bottom line is what our tests can eliminate, you’re having to look at the 500 VPNs out there and narrow it down to, say, three or four to start with. But you should check those three or four for what works best for you.

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Beth Mauder: Anything else, David?

David Gewirtz: I would say that things to look at, and if you’re looking at choosing a VPN, you want to look for a VPN that has something called a kill switch. What that means is, is that if the VPN ceases to function, it doesn’t just let your data go out. What it does is it shuts off your internet connection. That’s a really important thing to keep in mind. Because again, if you’re in a coffee shop somewhere and the VPN itself quits for some reason, without the kill switch, now your data is free and open to go out to everyone. What you want is to have it decide, “I don’t have a connection. I am just going to shut you on down.” And that way, you’re careful about that. Other things to keep in mind are what you’re using the VPN for. Are you using it just to protect your login information? Or are you using it because you’re concerned about stalkers or you’re an activist or something like that?

If you’re just protecting your own information and you’re in a coffee shop, then most of these VPNs will do fine for you. If you are using the VPN to protect your life, then you need to do additional research. No one of these articles will be enough. You need to go onto forums. You need to go to groups that are like you to see what they say and what they experience. Because many people, well, not many people, but a significant percentage of people use VPNs to protect their lives in certain ways. And for that, be more serious than just reading one review.

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/fastest-vpn-how-we-rated-the-top-services/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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Dutch police post ‘friendly’ warnings on hacking forums

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dutch-le.png

Dutch police have posted “friendly” messages on two of today’s largest hacking forums warning cyber-criminals that “hosting criminal infrastructure in the Netherlands is a lost cause.”

The messages were posted following “Operation Ladybird,” during which law enforcement agencies across several countries intervened to take down Emotet, one of today’s largest botnets.

Dutch police played a crucial role in the Emotet takedown after its officers seized two of three key Emotet command and control servers that were hosted in the Netherlands.

But today, Dutch police revealed that after the Emotet takedown, its officers also went on Raid and XSS, two publicly accessible and very popular hacking forums, and posted messages in order to dissuade other threat actors from abusing Dutch hosting providers to host botnets or other forms of cybercrime.

A message in English was posted on Raid, a forum popular with stolen data traders, and a second message, in Russian, was posted on XSS (formerly known as DamageLab), a Russian-speaking forum where hackers rent access to malware-as-a-service operations, and a forum usually frequented by today’s top ransomware gangs.

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Message posted on the Raid forum by Dutch police

Image: Dutch police

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Message posted on the XSS forum by Dutch police

Image: Dutch police

The messages, as can be seen above, warn hackers that “hosting criminal infrastructure in the Netherlands is a lost cause” and that Dutch police plans to continue seizing their infrastructure.

A link to a YouTube video was also included, a video that ends with a message from Dutch police that says: “Everyone makes mistakes. We are waiting for yours.”

The aggressive messages aren’t a surprise, at least for cyber-security experts, most of which are well aware of the Dutch police’s aggressive stance.

Over the past years, Dutch police have been at the center of many botnet takedowns, big and small. They arrested the owners of two web hosting providers that commonly hosted DDoS botnets, took down 15 different DDoS botnets in a week, moved to intercept encrypted BlackBox cryptophone messages, shut down Ennetcom for providing encrypted chat support for cybrecrime groups, and have aggressively hunted phishers, malware operators, and users of DDoS-for-hire services.

Dutch police are also currently at the heart of a mass-uninstallation operation to remove the Emotet malware from infected hosts, together with German police.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/dutch-police-post-friendly-warnings-on-hacking-forums/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold review: An innovative shape-shifting tablet/laptop

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Pros

  • Innovative industrial design
  • Bright, sharp OLED screen
  • Solid screen folding mechanism
  • Robust chassis build
  • Optional 5G mobile broadband

Cons

  • Can’t customise processor or RAM
  • Minimal ports
  • Disappointing mini-keyboard and touchpad
  • Battery life could be better
  • Kickstand only supports landscape mode
  • Seriously expensive

Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 Fold is the world’s first foldable PC. Its 13.3-inch OLED screen folds down the middle, allowing you to use it in laptop mode with a mini-keyboard, fully open as a handheld tablet, or as a standalone screen, propped up by its kickstand. This fascinating innovation doesn’t come cheap, though. The starting price is £2,301.43 (inc. VAT; £1,917.86 ex. VAT) in the UK, or $2,499 in the US. 

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Lenovo’s 13.3-inch ThinkPad X1 Fold can operate in multiple modes.

Images: Lenovo

There’s a compelling concept behind the ThinkPad X1 Fold: to deliver excellent tablet and laptop modes, with a work- and leisure-friendly screen, while being portable and making no compromise on usability. That’s a big ask, and it’s important to note at the outset that despite Lenovo’s best efforts, the X1 Fold doesn’t provide all the answers.

Fully open, the touch screen measures 13.3 inches across the diagonal, with a resolution of 2,048 x 1,536 pixels (192.5ppi, 4:3 aspect ratio). Although maximum brightness is only 300 nits, the OLED panel delivers  clear, sharp images with vibrant colours. It’s a pleasure to use in tablet mode, in both landscape and portrait orientation.

There’s a kickstand built into the back of the device that holds the ThinkPad X1 Fold at an upright angle in landscape orientation. However, when I tapped anywhere in the upper quarter of the screen, it felt in danger of tipping backwards. You can’t prop up the X1 Fold in portrait mode. 

There are speakers on the long edges, which deliver plenty of volume. Bass tones could be stronger, but that’s a perennial issue with laptops. However, the positioning of the speaker grilles means that when the kickstand is used for landscape-mode operation, the lower speaker can get muffled. 

You can interact with the screen with a fingertip or by using the Lenovo Mod Pen stylus, the on-screen soft keyboard or a physical Mini Keyboard. The stylus and mini-keyboard are provided with three of the four off-the-shelf iterations of this laptop in the UK, although the entry-level £2,301.43 (inc. VAT) model doesn’t include them. The Mode Pen costs £90 (inc. VAT), while the Mini Keyboard adds £200 (inc. VAT) to the price. 

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Images at Lenovo’s website show the ThinkPad X1 Fold being held in one hand as if it were a paperback book. That’s somewhat disingenuous, given that the device weighs a kilogram (0.99kg to be exact). 

When you start to fold the screen, an applet called the Lenovo Mode Switcher appears. You tap this to either keep the screen in single view mode, or have two vertical pages. Mode Switcher is available whenever you want to use it, so it’s easy to flip between different viewing modes. Dragging windows around the screen isn’t always as easy or effective as it should be: I found resizing a little jerky, and it’s tricky dragging apps across the folded area of the screen. It’s also irritating that when you fold the screen for laptop mode use and place the mini-keyboard onto its bottom half, windows don’t automatically resize to fit the top half of the screen only. 

To put the ThinkPad X1 Fold away you close it up as you would close a book. The result is something with a desktop footprint little bigger than a paperback book, although it’s thicker than many paperbacks. The folded dimensions are: 158.2mm x 236mm x 27.8mm, while unfolded (with the screen entirely flat) it measures 299.4mm x 236mm x 11.5mm. When you’re travelling with the ThinkPad X1 Fold, the mini-keyboard will sit inside the fold, and the keyboard has an integrated loop to house the Mod Pen stylus. The body of the ThinkPad X1 Fold is covered in soft and pliable leather at the back, giving it a folio-like appearance when closed. 

As for the X1 Fold’s robustness, only long-term use will confirm whether the screen and hinge mechanism withstand being folded multiple times a day. There’s a rubbery, bevelled, flexing section on the bezel at the fold point, which has enough of an airgap at its outer edge at certain fold angles to raise concern about dust ingress.  But the build includes both carbon fibre and magnesium alloy, and the spec sheet notes that the X1 Fold has passed MIL-STD 810H ruggedness tests. 

Lenovo allays concern that the folding screen might be prone to scratching, noting that it’s been tested for the effects of objects getting wedged in the gap that’s apparent when the device is folded up like a book. 

You can use the provided mini-keyboard either perched on one half of the screen where it’s secured by magnets, with the other half of the screen folded upwards laptop-style, or entirely separately from the fully folded-out screen. I preferred the latter mode, as it offered more screen real estate, and felt a lot less cramped. 

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Left: Screen fully open and supported in landscape orientation by the kickstand, with the Bluetooth Mini-Keyboard and Mod Pen stylus. Right: laptop mode, with the Mini-Keyboard magnetically attached to half of the folded screen.

Images: Sandra Vogel / ZDNet

Unusually for Lenovo, the keyboard is disappointing in use. Thin and light, it feels a little flimsy in the hands, but that’s not its main failing. There’s very little return to the keys, and it’s frustrating that access to some characters — such as square brackets and ‘/’ — require the Fn key to be held down; others — such as curled brackets, ‘?’ and ‘@’ — require Ctrl as well. It’s quite a steep learning curve, and typing speed is likely to suffer until you adjust — or switch to a better Bluetooth keyboard. 

The touchpad is even more disappointing because, at 2.5 inches wide, it’s just too small for its intended function. Lenovo clearly wanted to give as much space as possible to the keyboard, but the touchpad suffers as a result. 

The internal battery for the Mini Keyboard provides up to 40 hours of use, Lenovo says, and can be charged either via USB or wirelessly from the X1 Fold when the keyboard is attached in laptop mode. USB charging is via Micro-USB — a distinctly legacy solution for such an otherwise forward-looking product. 

The Mod Pen stylus is far better, although it’s a shame there’s no magnet to hold it to the ThinkPad X1 Fold. Still it’s efficient and usable, supporting 4,096 pressure levels. The Mod Pen charges via USB-C, with a single charge lasting for 332 hours, according to Lenovo. 

There is a 5MP hybrid IR webcam on the left side of the top bezel when the screen is fully open and in landscape mode. It works fine for video calls in this orientation, but less so in laptop mode, when the camera is on the right side, close to the hinge. There’s no ThinkShutter privacy cover, as seen on many ThinkPads, although the bezel seems big enough to accommodate this. If cost considerations ruled out a ThinkShutter, that’s arguably a false economy. 

Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) and Bluetooth (5.1) are on-board as standard, with 5G mobile broadband a £220 (inc. VAT) optional extra. The entry-level pre-configured model runs Windows 10 Home, while the remainder run Windows 10 Pro. All four UK off-the-shelf configurations are built around Intel’s Core i5 L1G67 processor with Hybrid Technology and 8GB of RAM, and neither CPU nor RAM can be customised. You can go beyond the entry-level 256GB of SSD storage, to 512GB (+£120) or 1TB (+£180).  

Lenovo is frugal with ports and connectors, providing just two USB-C ports on the chassis, one of which is needed for charging. One of the USB-C ports is, irritatingly, inaccessible when the kickstand is in use. There’s no fingerprint reader, and not even a 3.5mm headset connector, which is standard fare in laptops. 

My review configuration had a 256GB SSD and cost £2,799.99 (inc. VAT; £2.333.32 ex. VAT). A high-end model with a 512GB SSD and mobile broadband costs £3,159.99 (inc. VAT; £2,633.32 ex. VAT). 

Lenovo claims 8.5 hours of life for the ThinkPad X1 Fold’s 50Wh battery, which is modest by today’s standards. In fairness, there isn’t a great deal of chassis space in which to store a battery, but bear this in mind if you’re considering the X1 Fold as your main workhorse. To test battery life, I worked in both full-screen and half-screen modes with the mini-keyboard across a three-hour period, during which I wrote into web apps, browsed and streamed music and video. During this period the battery dropped 37% from a full charge, suggesting battery life of just over 8 hours. Lenovo says the battery will recharge to 80% in an hour. 

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Image: Lenovo

Conclusions

The ThinkPad X1 Fold’s signature folding screen worked faultlessly throughout the review period, and is a marvel. That said, there are some significant usability issues to contend with, such as the poor mini-keyboard, a dearth of ports and connectors, and moderate battery life. Also, it’s not clear why the webcam lacks a ThinkShutter, one of the USB-C ports is inaccessible when the kickstand is in use, and the kickstand only supports landscape mode.

Factor in the price, which is high at the entry level and gets astronomical towards the top end, and it’s hard to recommend the ThinkPad X1 Fold. As a proof-of-concept for folding screens, it’s exemplary. But as an everyday tablet/laptop it’s expensive and under-specified, with too many usability compromises. 

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/product/lenovo-thinkpad-x1-fold/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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Ditching LastPass? Here are some alternatives to try

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LastPass has announced some big changes to its free offering, making the service much more restrictive for people who want to access their passwords across mobile devices and computers.

Now, before I go any further, I think it’s worth pointing out that I am a LastPass Premium user. I have been for many years, and I’ve been 100 percent satisfied with the service, especially for $3 a month.

But, I can also understand why you might not be so keen to pay for something that was previously free.

Let’s take a look at what alternatives are on offer to you.

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This is a great choice for those in the Apple ecosystem. Save a password on one device, and it’s available on all your Apple devices.

It works well for saving web and app log in details, but it’s not really suited to other passwords and things like PIN codes.

It’s free, but the cost of entry into the Apple club can hardly be considered free.

View Now at Apple

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If you’re a Google Chrome user, then you already have a cross-platform password manager that will work anywhere you have Google Chrome installed and signed in to your Google Account.

It works well for saving web and app log-in details, but it’s not really suited to other passwords and things like PIN codes.

View Now at Google

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The free plan allows you to store unlimited passwords, notes, and credit cards and sync them to an unlimited number of devices, but you can only have one active device (in other words, you’ll be logged out of other devices).

The premium plan, which starts at $1.49 a month if you take out a two-year plan, is one of the best-value premium offering out there.

View Now at Nord

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Along with a paid service, LogMeOnce offers a free ad-supported service that offers unlimited passwords across unlimited devices. You can also get a password generator, and the ability to store three credit cards.

View Now at LogMeOnce

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While being part of a much bigger suite, Zoho Vault is offered as a free password service with unlimited passwords across unlimited devices, as well as premium features such as two-factor authentication and a password generator.

View Now at Zoho

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Not a cloud-service, but a free, open source, lightweight and easy-to-use password manager for Windows. Not using Windows? There are unofficial ports for a variety of platforms (make of that what you will), including Android, macOS, iOS and iPadOS.

I’ve used KeePass in the past, but the absence of cloud syncing and automatic syncing across multiple devices makes it harder work to use.

View Now at KeePass

See also: Best password managers in 2021 for business or personal use

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/ditching-lastpass-here-are-some-alternatives-to-try/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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