Connect with us

Nano Technology

Towards single-species selectivity of membranes with subnanometre pores

Avatar

Published

on

  • 1.

    Elimelech, M. & Phillip, W. A. The future of seawater desalination: energy, technology, and the environment. Science 333, 712–717 (2011).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 2.

    Werber, J. R., Osuji, C. O. & Elimelech, M. Materials for next-generation desalination and water purification membranes. Nat. Rev. Mater. 1, 1–15 (2016).

    Google Scholar 

  • 3.

    Werber, J. R., Deshmukh, A. & Elimelech, M. The critical need for increased selectivity, not increased water permeability, for desalination membranes. Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett. 3, 112–120 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 4.

    Park, H. B., Kamcev, J., Robeson, L. M., Elimelech, M. & Freeman, B. D. Maximizing the right stuff: The trade-off between membrane permeability and selectivity. Science 356, 1138–1148 (2017).

    Google Scholar 

  • 5.

    Werber, J. R. & Elimelech, M. Permselectivity limits of biomimetic desalination membranes. Sci. Adv. 4, eaar8266 (2018).

    Google Scholar 

  • 6.

    Werber, J. R., Porter, C. J. & Elimelech, M. A path to ultraselectivity: Support layer properties to maximize performance of biomimetic desalination membranes. Environ. Sci. Technol. 52, 10737–10747 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 7.

    Ritt, C. L., Werber, J. R., Deshmukh, A. & Elimelech, M. Monte carlo simulations of framework defects in layered two-dimensional nanomaterial desalination membranes: implications for permeability and selectivity. Environ. Sci. Technol. 53, 6214–6224 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 8.

    Homaeigohar, S. & Elbahri, M. Graphene membranes for water desalination. NPG Asia Mater. 9, e427 (2017).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 9.

    Luo, T., Abdu, S. & Wessling, M. Selectivity of ion exchange membranes: A review. J. Memb. Sci. 555, 429–454 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 10.

    Zhang, H. et al. Ultrafast selective transport of alkali metal ions in metal organic frameworks with subnanometer pores. Sci. Adv. 4, eaaq0066 (2018).

    Google Scholar 

  • 11.

    Li, X. et al. Fast and selective fluoride ion conduction in sub-1-nanometer metal-organic framework channels. Nat. Commun. 10, 2490 (2019).

    Google Scholar 

  • 12.

    Alvarez, P. J. J., Chan, C. K., Elimelech, M., Halas, N. J. & Villagrán, D. Emerging opportunities for nanotechnology to enhance water security. Nat. Nanotechnol. 13, 634–641 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 13.

    Sadeghi, I., Kaner, P. & Asatekin, A. Controlling and expanding the selectivity of filtration membranes. Chem. Mater. 21, 7328–7354 (2018).

    Google Scholar 

  • 14.

    Nghiem, L. D. et al. Extraction and transport of metal ions and small organic compounds using polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs). J. Memb. Sci. 281, 7–41 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 15.

    Thiruraman, J. P. et al. Angstrom-size defect creation and ionic transport through pores in single-layer MoS2. Nano Lett. 18, 1651–1659 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 16.

    Radha, B. et al. Molecular transport through capillaries made with atomic-scale precision. Nature 538, 222–225 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 17.

    Jones, E., Qadir, M., van Vliet, M. T. H., Smakhtin, V. & Kang, S. The state of desalination and brine production: A global outlook. Sci. Total Environ. 657, 1343–1356 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 18.

    Campione, A. et al. Electrodialysis for water desalination: A critical assessment of recent developments on process fundamentals, models and applications. Desalination 434, 121–160 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 19.

    Faucher, S. et al. Critical knowledge gaps in mass transport through single-digit nanopores: A review and perspective. J. Phys. Chem. C. 123, 21309–21326 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 20.

    Wijmans, J. G. & Baker, R. W. The solution-diffusion model: a review. J. Memb. Sci. 107, 1–21 (1995).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 21.

    Mukherjee, P. & Sengupta, A. K. Ion exchange selectivity as a surrogate indicator of relative permeability of ions in reverse osmosis processes. Environ. Sci. Technol. 37, 1432–1440 (2003).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 22.

    Epsztein, R., Cheng, W., Shaulsky, E., Dizge, N. & Elimelech, M. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying the difference between chloride and nitrate rejection in nanofiltration. J. Memb. Sci. 548, 694–701 (2017).

    Google Scholar 

  • 23.

    Sata, T. Studies on anion exchange membranes having permselectivity for specific anions in electrodialysis – Effect of hydrophilicity of anion exchange membranes on permselectivity of anions. J. Memb. Sci. 167, 1–31 (2000).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 24.

    Cheng, W. et al. Selective removal of divalent cations by polyelectrolyte multilayer nanofiltration membrane: Role of polyelectrolyte charge, ion size, and ionic strength. J. Memb. Sci. 559, 98–106 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 25.

    Collins, F. C. Activation energy of the Eyring theory of liquid viscosity and diffusion. J. Chem. Phys. 26, 398–400 (1957).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 26.

    Eyring, H. Viscosity, plasticity, and diffusion as examples of absolute reaction rates. J. Chem. Phys. 4, 283–291 (1936).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 27.

    Ewell, R. H. & Eyring, H. Theory of the viscosity of liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. J. Chem. Phys. 5, 726–736 (1937).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 28.

    Zwolinski, B. J., Eyring, H. & Reese, C. E. Diffusion and membrane permeability. J. Phys. Colloid Chem. 53, 1426–1453 (1949).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 29.

    Castillo, L. F. Del, Mason, E. A. & Viehland, L. A. Energy-barrier models for membrane transport. Biophys. Chem. 9, 111–120 (1979).

    Google Scholar 

  • 30.

    Sogami, M. et al. Application of the transition state theory to water transport across cell membranes. Biochim. Biophys. Acta – Biomembr. 1511, 42–48 (2001).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 31.

    Babu, J. S. & Sathian, S. P. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and transition state theory to evaluate solid-liquid interfacial friction in carbon nanotube membranes. Phys. Rev. E 85, 051205 (2012).

    Google Scholar 

  • 32.

    Epsztein, R., Qin, M., Shaulsky, E. & Elimelech, M. Activation behavior for ion permeation in ion-exchange membranes: Role of ion dehydration in selective transport. J. Memb. Sci. 580, 316–326 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 33.

    Latorre, R. & Miller, C. Conduction and selectivity in potassium channels. J. Membr. Biol. 71, 11–30 (1983).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 34.

    Wang, J. H., Robinson, C. V. & Edelman, I. S. Self-diffusion and structure of liquid water. III. Measurement of the self-diffusion of liquid water with H2, H3 and O18 as tracers. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 75, 466–470 (1953).

    Google Scholar 

  • 35.

    Venkataraman, L., Klare, J. E., Nuckolls, C., Hybertsen, M. S. & Steigerwald, M. L. Dependence of single-molecule junction conductance on molecular conformation. Nature 442, 904–907 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 36.

    Pati, R. & Karna, S. P. Current switching by conformational change in a π-σ-π molecular wire. Phys. Rev. B – Condens. Matter Mater. Phys. 69, 155419 (2004).

    Google Scholar 

  • 37.

    Weigelt, S. et al. Chiral switching by spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed organic molecules. Nat. Mater. 5, 112–117 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 38.

    Daasbjerg, K. et al. Evidence for large inner reorganization energies in the reduction of diaryl disulfides: Toward a mechanistic link between concerted and stepwise dissociative electron transfers? J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121, 1750–1751 (1999).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 39.

    Pophristic, V., Goodman, L. & Guchhait, N. Role of lone-pairs in internal rotation barriers. J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 4290–4297 (1997).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 40.

    Sharma, R. R., Agrawal, R. & Chellam, S. Temperature effects on sieving characteristics of thin-film composite nanofiltration membranes: Pore size distributions and transport parameters. J. Memb. Sci. 223, 69–87 (2003).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 41.

    Luo, J. & Wan, Y. Effects of pH and salt on nanofiltration-a critical review. J. Membr. Sci. 438, 18–28 (2013).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 42.

    Nghiem, L. D., Schäfer, A. I. & Elimelech, M. Role of electrostatic interactions in the retention of pharmaceutically active contaminants by a loose nanofiltration membrane. J. Memb. Sci. 286, 52–59 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 43.

    Epsztein, R., Shaulsky, E., Dizge, N., Warsinger, D. M. & Elimelech, M. Role of ionic charge density in Donnan exclusion of monovalent anions by nanofiltration. Environ. Sci. Technol. 52, 4108–4116 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 44.

    Richards, L. A., Schäfer, A. I., Richards, B. S. & Corry, B. The importance of dehydration in determining ion transport in narrow pores. Small 8, 1701–1709 (2012).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 45.

    Marcus, Y. Thermodynamics of solvation of ions. J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 87, 2995–2999 (1991).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 46.

    Ben-Amotz, D., Raineri, F. O. & Stell, G. Solvation thermodynamics: Theory and applications. J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 6866–6878 (2005).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 47.

    Sahu, S., Di Ventra, M. & Zwolak, M. Dehydration as a universal mechanism for ion selectivity in graphene and other atomically thin pores. Nano Lett. 17, 4719–4724 (2017).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 48.

    Richards, L. A., Schäfer, A. I., Richards, B. S. & Corry, B. Quantifying barriers to monovalent anion transport in narrow non-polar pores. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 11633–11638 (2012).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 49.

    Zwolak, M., Wilson, J. & Di Ventra, M. Dehydration and ionic conductance quantization in nanopores. J. Phys. Condens. Matter 22, 454126 (2010).

    Google Scholar 

  • 50.

    Tansel, B. Significance of thermodynamic and physical characteristics on permeation of ions during membrane separation: Hydrated radius, hydration free energy and viscous effects. Sep. Purif. Technol. 86, 119–126 (2012).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 51.

    Sata, T., Yamaguchi, T. & Matsusaki, K. Effect of hydrophobicity of ion exchange groups of anion exchange membranes on permselectivity between two anions. J. Phys. Chem. 99, 12875–12882 (1995).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 52.

    Hannesschlaeger, C., Horner, A. & Pohl, P. Intrinsic membrane permeability to small molecules. Chem. Rev. 119, 5922–5953 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 53.

    De Gier, J., Mandersloot, J. G., Hupkes, J. V., McElhaney, R. N. & van Veek, W. P. On the mechanism of non-electrolyte permeation through lipid bilayers and through biomembranes. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 233, 610–618 (1971).

    Google Scholar 

  • 54.

    Noy, A. Kinetic model of gas transport in carbon nanotube channels. J. Phys. Chem. C. 117, 7656–7660 (2013).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 55.

    Boo, C. et al. High performance nanofiltration membrane for effective removal of perfluoroalkyl substances at high water recovery. Environ. Sci. Technol. 52, 7279–7288 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 56.

    DuChanois, R. M., Epsztein, R., Trivedi, J. A. & Elimelech, M. Controlling pore structure of polyelectrolyte multilayer nanofiltration membranes by tuning polyelectrolyte-salt interactions. J. Memb. Sci. 581, 413–420 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 57.

    Farrokhzad, H., Darvishmanesh, S., Genduso, G., Van Gerven, T. & Van Der Bruggen, B. Development of bivalent cation selective ion exchange membranes by varying molecular weight of polyaniline. Electrochim. Acta 158, 64–72 (2015).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 58.

    Vaselbehagh, M., Karkhanechi, H., Takagi, R. & Matsuyama, H. Surface modification of an anion exchange membrane to improve the selectivity for monovalent anions in electrodialysis – experimental verification of theoretical predictions. J. Memb. Sci. 490, 301–310 (2015).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 59.

    Epsztein, R., Nir, O., Lahav, O. & Green, M. Selective nitrate removal from groundwater using a hybrid nanofiltration–reverse osmosis filtration scheme. Chem. Eng. J. 279, 372–378 (2015).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 60.

    Zhou, Y. & MacKinnon, R. The occupancy of ions in the K+ selectivity filter: Charge balance and coupling of ion binding to a protein conformational change underlie high conduction rates. J. Mol. Biol. 333, 965–975 (2003).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 61.

    Doyle, D. A. et al. The structure of the potassium channel: molecular basis of K+ conduction and selectivity. Science 280, 69–77 (1998).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 62.

    Morais-Cabral, Ä. H., Kaufman, A. & Mackinnon, R. Chemistry of ion coordination and hydration revealed by a K+ channel-Fab complex at 2.0 Å resolution. Nature 414, 43–48 (2001).

    Google Scholar 

  • 63.

    Gouaux, E. & MacKinnon, R. Principles of selective ion transport in channels and pumps. Science 310, 1461–1465 (2005).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 64.

    Barboiu, M. Encapsulation versus self-aggregation toward highly selective artificial K+ channels. Acc. Chem. Res. 51, 2711–2718 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 65.

    Gilles, A. & Barboiu, M. Highly selective artificial K+ channels: An example of selectivity-induced transmembrane potential. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 138, 426–432 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 66.

    Glasstone, S., Laidler, K. J. & Eyring, H. The Theory of Rate Processes (McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1941).

  • 67.

    Eyring, H. The activated complex and the absolute rate of chemical reactions. Chem. Rev. 17, 65–77 (1935).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 68.

    Kopec, W. et al. Direct knock-on of desolvated ions governs strict ion selectivity in K+ channels. Nat. Chem. 10, 813–820 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 69.

    Schoch, R. B., Han, J. & Renaud, P. Transport phenomena in nanofluidics. Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 839–883 (2008).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 70.

    Abraham, J. et al. Tunable sieving of ions using graphene oxide membranes. Nat. Nanotechnol. 12, 546–550 (2017).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 71.

    Li, W., Wu, W. & Li, Z. Controlling interlayer spacing of graphene oxide membranes by external pressure regulation. ACS Nano 12, 9309–9317 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 72.

    Simon, G. P. et al. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing. Sci. Adv. 2, e1501272 (2016).

    Google Scholar 

  • 73.

    Chen, L. et al. Ion sieving in graphene oxide membranes via cationic control of interlayer spacing. Nature 550, 1–4 (2017).

    Google Scholar 

  • 74.

    Joshi, R. K. et al. Precise and ultrafast molecular sieving through graphene oxide membranes. Science 343, 752–754 (2014).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 75.

    Choi, W. et al. Diameter-dependent ion transport through the interior of isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes. Nat. Commun. 4, 2397 (2013).

    Google Scholar 

  • 76.

    Tunuguntla, R. H. et al. Enhanced water permeability and tunable ion selectivity in subnanometer carbon nanotube porins. Science 357, 792–796 (2017).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 77.

    Ali, S., Rehman, S. A. U., Luan, H. Y., Farid, M. U. & Huang, H. Challenges and opportunities in functional carbon nanotubes for membrane-based water treatment and desalination. Sci. Total Environ. 646, 1126–1139 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 78.

    Li, F., Li, L., Liao, X. & Wang, Y. Precise pore size tuning and surface modifications of polymeric membranes using the atomic layer deposition technique. J. Memb. Sci. 385–386, 1–9 (2011).

    Google Scholar 

  • 79.

    Chen, P. et al. Atomic layer deposition to fine-tune the surface properties and diameters of fabricated nanopores. Nano Lett. 4, 1333–1337 (2004).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 80.

    Spichiger-keller, U. E. Ionophores, ligands and reactands. Anal. Chim. Acta 400, 65–72 (1999).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 81.

    Ovchinnikov, Y. A. Physico‐chemical basis of ion transport through biological membranes: ionophores and ion channels. Eur. J. Biochem. 94, 321–336 (1979).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 82.

    Ammann, D. et al. Preparation of neutral ionophores for alkali and alkaline earth metal cations and their application in ion selective membrane electrodes. Helv. Chem. Acta 58, 1535–1548 (1975).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 83.

    Bowman-James, K. Alfred Werner revisited: The coordination chemistry of anions. Acc. Chem. Res. 38, 671–678 (2005).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 84.

    Kang, S. O., Begum, R. A. & Bowman-James, K. Amide-based ligands for anion coordination. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45, 7882–7894 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 85.

    Prets, E., Badertscher, M., Welti, M., Morf, W. E. & Simon, W. Design features of ionophores for ion selective electrodes. Pure Appl. Chem. 60, 567–574 (1988).

    Google Scholar 

  • 86.

    Almeida, M. I. G. S., Cattrall, R. W. & Kolev, S. D. Recent trends in extraction and transport of metal ions using polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs). J. Memb. Sci. 415–416, 9–23 (2012).

    Google Scholar 

  • 87.

    Sheng, C., Wijeratne, S., Cheng, C., Baker, G. L. & Bruening, M. L. Facilitated ion transport through polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing metal-binding ligands. J. Memb. Sci. 459, 169–176 (2014).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 88.

    Toutianoush, A., El-Hashani, A., Schnepf, J. & Tieke, B. Multilayer membranes of p-sulfonato-calix[8]arene and polyvinylamine and their use for selective enrichment of rare earth metal ions. Appl. Surf. Sci. 246, 430–436 (2005).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 89.

    Acar, E. T., Buchsbaum, S. F., Combs, C., Fornasiero, F. & Siwy, Z. S. Biomimetic potassium-selective nanopores. Sci. Adv. 5, eaav2568 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 90.

    Fang, A., Kroenlein, K., Riccardi, D. & Smolyanitsky, A. Highly mechanosensitive ion channels from graphene-embedded crown ethers. Nat. Mater. 18, 76–81 (2019).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 91.

    Richards, L. A., Richards, B. S., Corry, B. & Schäfer, A. I. Experimental energy barriers to anions transporting through nanofiltration membranes. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 1968–1976 (2013).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 92.

    Sigurdardottir, S. B., DuChanois, R. M., Epsztein, R., Pinelo, M. & Elimelech, M. Energy barriers to anion transport in nanofiltration membranes: role of intra-pore diffusion. J. Memb. Sci. 603, 117921 (2020).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 93.

    Khavrutskii, I. V., Gorfe, A. A., Lu, B. & McCammon, J. A. Free energy for the permeation of Na+ and CI- ions and their Ion-pair through a zwitterionic dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer by umbrella integration with harmonic fourier beads. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1706–1716 (2009).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 94.

    Gao, P., Hunter, A., Summe, M. J. & Phillip, W. A. A method for the efficient fabrication of multifunctional mosaic membranes by inkjet printing. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 8, 19772–19779 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 95.

    Rajesh, S., Yan, Y., Chang, H. C., Gao, H. & Phillip, W. A. Mixed mosaic membranes prepared by layer-by-layer assembly for ionic separations. ACS Nano 8, 12338–12345 (2014).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 96.

    Malmir, H. et al. Induced charge anisotropy: A hidden variable affecting ion transport through membranes. Matter 2, 735–750 (2019).

    Google Scholar 

  • 97.

    Haji-Akbari, A. Forward-flux sampling with jumpy order parameters. J. Chem. Phys. 149, 072303 (2018).

    Google Scholar 

  • 98.

    Tu, K. L., Nghiem, L. D. & Chivas, A. R. Coupling effects of feed solution pH and ionic strength on the rejection of boron by NF/RO membranes. Chem. Eng. J. 168, 700–706 (2011).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 99.

    Somrani, A., Hamzaoui, A. H. & Pontie, M. Study on lithium separation from salt lake brines by nanofiltration (NF) and low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO). Desalination 317, 184–192 (2013).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 100.

    Saraf, A., Johnson, K. & Lind, M. L. Poly(vinyl) alcohol coating of the support layer of reverse osmosis membranes to enhance performance in forward osmosis. Desalination 333, 1–9 (2014).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 101.

    Nicolini, J. V., Borges, C. P. & Ferraz, H. C. Selective rejection of ions and correlation with surface properties of nanofiltration membranes. Sep. Purif. Technol. 171, 238–247 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 102.

    Qi, S. et al. Polymersomes-based high-performance reverse osmosis membrane for desalination. J. Memb. Sci. 555, 177–184 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 103.

    Richards, L. A., Vuachère, M. & Schäfer, A. I. Impact of pH on the removal of fluoride, nitrate and boron by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis. Desalination 261, 331–337 (2010).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 104.

    Jeong, B. H. et al. Interfacial polymerization of thin film nanocomposites: A new concept for reverse osmosis membranes. J. Memb. Sci. 294, 1–7 (2007).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 105.

    Hong, S. U., Malaisamy, R. & Bruening, M. L. Optimization of flux and selectivity in Cl-/SO42- separations with multilayer polyelectrolyte membranes. J. Membr. Sci. 283, 366–372 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 106.

    Mukherjee, D., Kulkarni, A. & Gill, W. N. Flux enhancement of reverse osmosis membranes by chemical surface modification. J. Memb. Sci. 97, 231–249 (1994).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 107.

    Harrison, C. J., Le Gouellec, Y. A., Cheng, R. C. & Childress, A. E. Bench-scale testing of nanofiltration for seawater desalination. J. Environ. Eng. 133, 1004–1014 (2007).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 108.

    Giagnorio, M. et al. Achieving low concentrations of chromium in drinking water by nanofiltration: membrane performance and selection. Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res. 25, 25294–25305 (2018).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 109.

    Redondo, J. A. & Frank, K. F. Sea water applications with FILMTEC reverse osmosis membranes from small to large plants in 10 years. Desalination 82, 31–49 (1991).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 110.

    Arena, J. T., McCloskey, B., Freeman, B. D. & McCutcheon, J. R. Surface modification of thin film composite membrane support layers with polydopamine: Enabling use of reverse osmosis membranes in pressure retarded osmosis. J. Memb. Sci. 375, 55–62 (2011).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 111.

    Al-Zoubi, H., Hilal, N., Darwish, N. A. & Mohammad, A. W. Rejection and modelling of sulphate and potassium salts by nanofiltration membranes: neural network and Spiegler-Kedem model. Desalination 206, 42–60 (2007).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 112.

    Widjaya, A., Hoang, T., Stevens, G. W. & Kentish, S. E. A comparison of commercial reverse osmosis membrane characteristics and performance under alginate fouling conditions. Sep. Purif. Technol. 89, 270–281 (2012).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 113.

    Malaisamy, R., Talla-Nwafo, A. & Jones, K. L. Polyelectrolyte modification of nanofiltration membrane for selective removal of monovalent anions. Sep. Purif. Technol. 77, 367–374 (2011).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 114.

    Wang, K. Y., Chung, T. S. & Qin, J. J. Polybenzimidazole (PBI) nanofiltration hollow fiber membranes applied in forward osmosis process. J. Memb. Sci. 300, 6–12 (2007).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 115.

    Freger, V., Arnot, T. C. & Howell, J. A. Separation of concentrated organic/inorganic salt mixtures by nanofiltration. J. Memb. Sci. 178, 185–193 (2000).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 116.

    Nilsson, M., Trägårdh, G. & Östergren, K. The influence of sodium chloride on mass transfer in a polyamide nanofiltration membrane at elevated temperatures. J. Memb. Sci. 280, 928–936 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 117.

    Tsuru, T., Izumi, S., Yoshioka, T. & Asaeda, M. Temperature effect on transport performance by inorganic nanofiltration membranes. AIChE J. 46, 565–574 (2000).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 118.

    Tsuru, T., Ogawa, K., Kanezashi, M. & Yoshioka, T. Permeation characteristics of electrolytes and neutral solutes through titania nanofiltration membranes at high temperatures. Langmuir 26, 10897–10905 (2010).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 119.

    Sharma, R. R. & Chellam, S. Temperature and concentration effects on electrolyte transport across porous thin-film composite nanofiltration membranes: Pore transport mechanisms and energetics of permeation. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 298, 327–340 (2006).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 120.

    Snow, M. J. H., de Winter, D., Buckingham, R., Campbell, J. & Wagner, J. New techniques for extreme conditions: high temperature reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Desalination 105, 57–61 (1996).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 121.

    Saltonstall, C. W. Jr Practical aspects of sea water desalination by reverse osmosis. Desalination 18, 315–320 (1976).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 122.

    Li, L., Dong, J. & Nenoff, T. M. Transport of water and alkali metal ions through MFI zeolite membranes during reverse osmosis. Sep. Purif. Technol. 53, 42–48 (2007).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 123.

    Mehdizadeh, H., Dickson, J. M. & Eriksson, P. K. Temperature effects on the performance of thin-film composite, aromatic polyamide membranes. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 28, 814–824 (1989).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 124.

    Connell, P. J. & Dickson, J. M. Modeling reverse osmosis separations with strong solute‐membrane affinity at different temperatures using the finely porous model. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 35, 1129–1148 (1988).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 125.

    Chen, J.-Y., Nomura, H. & Pusch, W. Temperature dependence of membrane transport parameters in hyperfiltration. Desalination 46, 437–446 (1983).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 126.

    Lonsdale, H. K., Merten, U. & Riley, R. L. Transport properties of cellulose acetate osmotic membranes. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 9, 1341–1362 (1965).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 127.

    Reid, C. E. & Kuppers, J. R. Physical characteristics of osmotic membranes of organic polymers. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 2, 264–272 (1959).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 128.

    Gary-Bobo, C. M. Effect of geometrical and chemical constraints on water flux across artificial membranes. J. Gen. Physiol. 57, 610–622 (2004).

    Google Scholar 

  • 129.

    Gary-Bobo, C. M. Role of hydrogen-bonding in nonelectrolyte diffusion through dense artificial membranes. J. Gen. Physiol. 54, 369–382 (2004).

    Google Scholar 

  • 130.

    Badessa, T. & Shaposhnik, V. The electrodialysis of electrolyte solutions of multi-charged cations. J. Memb. Sci. 498, 86–93 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 131.

    Freger, V. et al. Diffusion of water and ethanol in ion-exchange membranes: Limits of the geometric approach. J. Memb. Sci. 160, 213–224 (1999).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 132.

    Kumar, M., Grzelakowski, M., Zilles, J., Clark, M. & Meier, W. Highly permeable polymeric membranes based on the incorporation of the functional water channel protein Aquaporin Z. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 104, 20719–20724 (2007).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 133.

    Borgnia, M. J., Kozono, D., Calamita, G., Maloney, P. C. & Agre, P. Functional reconstitution and characterization of AqpZ, the E. coli water channel protein. J. Mol. Biol. 291, 1169–1179 (1999).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 134.

    Corry, B. Designing carbon nanotube membranes for efficient water desalination. J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 1427–1434 (2008).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 135.

    Song, C. & Corry, B. Intrinsic ion selectivity of narrow hydrophobic pores. J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 7642–7649 (2009).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 136.

    Williams, C. D. & Carbone, P. Selective removal of technetium from water using graphene oxide membranes. Environ. Sci. Technol. 50, 3875–3881 (2016).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 137.

    Sahu, S. & Zwolak, M. Ionic selectivity and filtration from fragmented dehydration in multilayer graphene nanopores. Nanoscale 9, 11424–11428 (2017).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 138.

    Konatham, D., Yu, J., Ho, T. A. & Striolo, A. Simulation insights for graphene-based water desalination membranes. Langmuir 29, 11884–11897 (2013).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 139.

    Zwolak, M., Lagerqvist, J. & Di Ventra, M. Quantized ionic conductance in nanopores. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 128102 (2009).

    Google Scholar 

  • 140.

    Arrhenius, S. A. Über die Reaktionsgeschwindigkeit bei der Inversion von Rohrzucker durch Säuren. Z. Phys. Chem. 4, 226–248 (1889).

    Google Scholar 

  • 141.

    Eyring, H. The theory of absolute reaction rates. Trans. Faraday Soc. 34, 41–48 (1938).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 142.

    Kramers, H. A. Brownian motion in a field of force and the diffusion model of chemical reactions. Physica 7, 284–304 (1940).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 143.

    Hanggi, P. 50 years after Kramers. Rev. Mod. Phys. 62, 251–341 (1990).

    Google Scholar 

  • 144.

    Wynne-Jones, W. F. K. & Eyring, H. The absolute rate of reactions in condensed phases. J. Chem. Phys. 3, 492–502 (1935).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  • 145.

    Garrett, B. C. Variational transition state theory. Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 35, 159–189 (1984).

    Google Scholar 

  • Source: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-020-0713-6

    Nano Technology

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Avatar

    Published

    on

    Home > Press > A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Researchers from the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) and the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at TU Dresden developed a general methodology for the reproducible fabrication of high efficiency perovskite solar cells. Their study has been published in the renowned journal Nature Communications. CREDIT
Christiane Kunath
    Researchers from the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) and the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at TU Dresden developed a general methodology for the reproducible fabrication of high efficiency perovskite solar cells. Their study has been published in the renowned journal Nature Communications. CREDIT
    Christiane Kunath

    Abstract:
    Perovskites, a class of materials first reported in the early 19th century, were “re-discovered” in 2009 as a possible candidate for power generation via their use in solar cells. Since then, they have taken the photovoltaic (PV) research community by storm, reaching new record efficiencies at an unprecedented pace. This improvement has been so rapid that by 2021, barely more than a decade of research later, they are already achieving performance similar to conventional silicon devices. What makes perovskites especially promising is the manner in which they can be created. Where silicon-based devices are heavy and require high temperatures for fabrication, perovskite devices can be lightweight and formed with minimal energy investiture. It is this combination – high performance and facile fabrication – which has excited the research community.

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells


    Dresden, Germany | Posted on April 1st, 2021

    As the performance of perovskite photovoltaics rocketed upward, left behind were some of the supporting developments needed to make a commercially viable technology. One issue that continues to plague perovskite development is device reproducibility. While some PV devices can be made with the desired level of performance, others made in the exact same manner often have significantly lower efficiencies, puzzling and frustrating the research community.

    Recently, researchers from the Emerging Electronic Technologies Group of Prof. Yana Vaynzof have identified that fundamental processes that occur during the perovskite film formation strongly influence the reproducibility of the photovoltaic devices. When depositing the perovskite layer from solution, an antisolvent is dripped onto the perovskite solution to trigger its crystallization. “We found that the duration for which the perovskite was exposed to the antisolvent had a dramatic impact on the final device performance, a variable which had, until now, gone unnoticed in the field.” says Dr. Alexander Taylor, a postdoctoral research associate in the Vaynzof group and the first author on the study. “This is related to the fact that certain antisolvents may at least partly dissolve the precursors of the perovskite layer, thus altering its final composition. Additionally, the miscibility of antisolvents with the perovskite solution solvents influences their efficacy in triggering crystallization.”

    These results reveal that, as researchers fabricate their PV devices, differences in this antisolvent step could cause the observed irreproducibility in performance. Going further, the authors tested a wide range of potential antisolvents, and showed that by controlling for these phenomena, they could obtain cutting-edge performance from nearly every candidate tested. “By identifying the key antisolvent characteristics that influence the quality of the perovskite active layers, we are also able to predict the optimal processing for new antisolvents, thus eliminating the need for the tedious trial-and-error optimization so common in the field.” adds Dr. Fabian Paulus, leader of the Transport in Hybrid Materials Group at cfaed and a contributor to the study.

    “Another important aspect of our study is the fact that we demonstrate how an optimal application of an antisolvent can significantly widen the processibility window of perovskite photovoltaic devices” notes Prof. Vaynzof, who led the work. “Our results offer the perovskite research community valuable insights necessary for the advancement of this promising technology into a commercial product.”

    ####

    For more information, please click here

    Contacts:
    Yana Vaynzof
    49-351-463-42132

    @tudresden_de

    Copyright © TU Dresden

    If you have a comment, please Contact us.

    Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

    Bookmark:
    Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

    Related Links

    The results were published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications.

    Related News Press

    News and information

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing April 1st, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Perovskites

    Shedding light on perovskite films: Efficient materials for future solar cells – New model to determine photoluminescence quantum efficiency March 16th, 2021

    Use of perovskite will be a key feature of the next generation of electronic appliances: Nanomaterials of perovskite dispersed in hexane and irradiated by laser; light emission by these materials is intense thanks to resistance to surface defects March 12th, 2021

    Researchers improve efficiency of next-generation solar cell material: Reducing internal losses could pave the way to low-cost perovskite-based photovoltaics that match silicon cells’ output February 26th, 2021

    Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells: A promising lead halide perovskite is great at converting sunlight to electricity, but it breaks down at room temperature; now scientists have discovered how to stabilize it with pressure from a diamond a January 22nd, 2021

    Possible Futures

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing April 1st, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Discoveries

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing April 1st, 2021

    DNA–Metal double helix: Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    Announcements

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing April 1st, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing April 1st, 2021

    DNA–Metal double helix: Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires March 26th, 2021

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Energy

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    Shedding light on perovskite films: Efficient materials for future solar cells – New model to determine photoluminescence quantum efficiency March 16th, 2021

    Use of perovskite will be a key feature of the next generation of electronic appliances: Nanomaterials of perovskite dispersed in hexane and irradiated by laser; light emission by these materials is intense thanks to resistance to surface defects March 12th, 2021

    Scientists stabilize atomically thin boron for practical use March 12th, 2021

    Solar/Photovoltaic

    Shedding light on perovskite films: Efficient materials for future solar cells – New model to determine photoluminescence quantum efficiency March 16th, 2021

    Scientists stabilize atomically thin boron for practical use March 12th, 2021

    Researchers improve efficiency of next-generation solar cell material: Reducing internal losses could pave the way to low-cost perovskite-based photovoltaics that match silicon cells’ output February 26th, 2021

    Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells: A promising lead halide perovskite is great at converting sunlight to electricity, but it breaks down at room temperature; now scientists have discovered how to stabilize it with pressure from a diamond a January 22nd, 2021

    Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
    Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56624

    Continue Reading

    Nano Technology

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing

    Avatar

    Published

    on

    Home > Press > Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing

    Peak wavelength of the polarized optical extinction spectrum as a function of the recovery temperature, showing the temperature-dependent behavior that can be applied for optical thermal-history sensors. Image credit: Mehedi H. Rizvi.
    Peak wavelength of the polarized optical extinction spectrum as a function of the recovery temperature, showing the temperature-dependent behavior that can be applied for optical thermal-history sensors. Image credit: Mehedi H. Rizvi.

    Abstract:
    Researchers have demonstrated that stretching shape-memory polymers embedded with clusters of gold nanoparticles alters their plasmon-coupling, giving rise to desirable optical properties. One potential application for the material is a sensor that relies on optical properties to track an object or environment’s thermal history.

    Plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles useful for thermal history sensing


    Durham, NC | Posted on April 1st, 2021

    At issue is a stretchable polymer embedded with gold nanospheres. If the material is heated and stretched, followed by cooling to room temperature, the material will hold its stretched shape indefinitely. Once reheated to 120 degrees Celsius, the material returns to its original shape.

    But what’s really interesting is that the gold nanospheres are not perfectly dispersed in the polymer. Instead, they form clusters, in which their surface plasmon resonances are coupled. These plasmon-coupled nanoparticles have optical properties that shift depending on how close they are to each other, which changes when stretching alters the shape of the composite.

    “When assessing the peak wavelength of light absorbed by the material, there are significant differences depending on whether the light is polarized parallel or perpendicular to the stretching direction,” says Joe Tracy, corresponding author of a paper on the work and a professor of materials science and engineering at NC State. “For light polarized parallel to the direction of stretching, the further you have stretched the material, the further the light absorbed shifts to the red. For light polarized perpendicular to the stretching direction there is a blueshift.”

    “We also found that, while the shape-memory polymer holds its shape at room temperature, it recovers its original shape in a predictable way, depending on the temperature it is exposed to,” says Tobias Kraus, co-author of the paper, a group leader at the Leibniz Institute for New Materials and a professor at Saarland University.

    Specifically, once stretched 140% past its original length, you can determine the highest temperature to which the polymer is then exposed, up to 120 degrees Celsius, by measuring how much it has shrunk back toward its original size. What’s more, because of the plasmon-coupled nanoparticles, this change can be measured indirectly, through measurements of the material’s optical properties.

    “From a practical perspective, this allows you to create an optical thermal-history sensor,” Joe Tracy says. “You can use light to see how hot the material got. An important application of thermal-history sensors is assuring the quality or safety of shipping or storing materials that are sensitive to significant changes in heat. We have demonstrated an approach based on plasmon coupling of gold nanoparticles.”

    The sensor concept was developed empirically, but the researchers also used computational modeling to better understand the structure of the clusters of gold nanospheres and how the clusters changed during stretching. The strength of plasmon coupling is related to the spacings between nanospheres, which is known as a “plasmon ruler.”

    “Based on our simulations, we can estimate the distance between plasmon-coupled nanoparticles from their optical properties,” says Amy Oldenburg, co-author of the paper and a professor of physics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “This comparison is informative for designing future polymer nanocomposites based on plasmon-coupled nanoparticles.”

    ####

    For more information, please click here

    Contacts:
    Matt Shipman

    @NCStateNews

    Copyright © North Carolina State University

    If you have a comment, please Contact us.

    Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

    Bookmark:
    Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

    Related Links

    The paper, “Plasmon-Coupled Gold Nanoparticles in Stretched Shape-Memory Polymers for Mechanical/Thermal Sensing,” appears in the journal ACS Applied Nano Materials. First author of the paper is Prachi Yadav, a former graduate student at NC State. The paper was co-authored by Mehedi Rizvi, Sumeet Mishra, Brian Chapman and Brian Lynch of NC State; and Björn Kuttich of the Leibniz Institute for New Materials.

    Related News Press

    News and information

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells April 1st, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    Fast-acting, color-changing molecular probe senses when a material is about to fail March 25th, 2021

    Possible Futures

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells April 1st, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Sensors

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    Scientists stabilize atomically thin boron for practical use March 12th, 2021

    Compression or strain – the material expands always the same March 10th, 2021

    CEA-Leti Announces 16 Papers to Be Presented At Photonics West 2021 and a Virtual Workshop on March 25 March 3rd, 2021

    Discoveries

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells April 1st, 2021

    DNA–Metal double helix: Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    Announcements

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells April 1st, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

    A general approach to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells April 1st, 2021

    DNA–Metal double helix: Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires March 26th, 2021

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
    Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56625

    Continue Reading

    Nano Technology

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope

    Avatar

    Published

    on

    Home > Press > Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope

    Abstract:
    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research announces the release of the Variable Field Module (VFM) accessory for the Jupiter XR atomic force microscope (AFM). The adjustable magnetic field enabled by the VFM accessory is useful for applications such as imaging the domain reversal behaviour of ferromagnetic thin films, studying magnetic field dependent resistance in sensor devices, or imaging magnetic particles. This Asylum Research exclusive accessory can be configured for the magnetic field to be applied either in-plane with the sample or out-of-plane. “The VFM accessory is unique to Asylum Research AFMs and will enable researchers to increase their knowledge of ferromagnetic and piezoelectric materials,” commented Dr. Jason Li, Applications Scientist manager at Oxford Instruments Asylum Research.

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope


    Santa Barbara, CA | Posted on March 26th, 2021

    Asylum Research AFMs are widely used across many different industrial and academic research fields including energy storage, polymers, semiconductors and 2D materials. The Jupiter XR is a large-sample AFM that can accommodate samples up to 200 millimeters in diameter and inspect areas up to 100×100 microns while still delivering ultra-high resolution and high throughput, with typical images requiring 1 minute to acquire.

    – End –

    Issued for and on behalf of Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Inc.

    ####

    About Oxford Instruments Asylum Research
    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research is the technology leader in atomic force microscopy for both materials and bioscience research. Asylum Research AFMs are widely used by both academic and industrial researchers for characterizing samples from diverse fields spanning material science, polymers, thin films, energy research, and biophysics. In addition to routine imaging of sample topography and roughness, Asylum Research AFMs also offer unmatched resolution and quantitative measurement capability for nanoelectrical, nanomechanical and electromechanical characterization. Recent advances have made these measurements far simpler and more automated for increased consistency and productivity. Its Cypher™, MFP-3D™, and Jupiter™ AFM product lines span a wide range of performance and budgets. Asylum Research also offers a comprehensive selection of AFM probes, accessories, and consumables. Sales, applications and service offices are located in the United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Japan, France, India, China and Taiwan, with distributor offices in other global regions.

    About Oxford Instruments plc

    Oxford Instruments designs, supplies and supports high-technology tools and systems with a focus on research and industrial applications. Innovation has been the driving force behind Oxford Instruments’ growth and success for 60 years, supporting its core purpose to address some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

    The first technology business to be spun out from Oxford University, Oxford Instruments is now a global company and is listed on the FTSE250 index of the London Stock Exchange (OXIG). Its strategy focuses on being a customer-centric, market-focused Group, understanding the technical and commercial challenges faced by its customers. Key market segments include Semiconductor & Communications, Advanced Materials, Healthcare & Life Science, and Quantum Technology.

    Their portfolio includes a range of core technologies in areas such as low temperature and high magnetic field environments; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; X-ray, electron, laser and optical based metrology; atomic force microscopy; optical imaging; and advanced growth, deposition and etching.

    Oxford Instruments is helping enable a greener economy, increased connectivity, improved health and leaps in scientific understanding. Their advanced products and services allow the world’s leading industrial companies and scientific research communities to image, analyze and manipulate materials down to the atomic and molecular level, helping to accelerate R&D, increase manufacturing productivity and make ground-breaking discoveries.

    For more information, please click here

    Contacts:
    Dominic Paszkeicz

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Inc.
    +1-805-696-6467

    Copyright © Oxford Instruments Asylum Research

    If you have a comment, please Contact us.

    Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

    Bookmark:
    Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

    Related News Press

    News and information

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    2 Dimensional Materials

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Nanotech scientists create world’s smallest origami bird March 17th, 2021

    Imaging

    Bruker Light-Sheet Microscopes at Major Comprehensive Cancer Center: New Advanced Imaging Center Powered by Two MuVi and LCS SPIM Microscopes March 25th, 2021

    Microscope that detects individual viruses could power rapid diagnostics March 19th, 2021

    Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique: Presentations at Photonics West 2021 Show How Early-Stage Imaging System’s Flexibility Can Be Applied Broadly in Medical Field March 18th, 2021

    Possible Futures

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Chip Technology

    Teamwork makes light shine ever brighter: Combined energy sources return a burst of photons from plasmonic gold nanogaps March 18th, 2021

    Remote control for quantum emitters:Novel approach could become a asset in quantum computers and quantum simulation March 12th, 2021

    Scientists build the smallest cable containing a spin switch March 12th, 2021

    GLOBALFOUNDRIES 22FDX RF Solution Provides the Basis for Next-Gen mmWave Automotive Radar: Next-generation auto radar technology, based on GF’s 22FDX RF solution, will help make vehicles smarter and roads even safer than today March 10th, 2021

    Announcements

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Tools

    Bruker Light-Sheet Microscopes at Major Comprehensive Cancer Center: New Advanced Imaging Center Powered by Two MuVi and LCS SPIM Microscopes March 25th, 2021

    Izon Science launches the Exoid to transform nanoparticle measurement: The semi-automated Exoid device uses new-generation Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing (TRPS) technology, enabling the measurement of complex nano-particle size, concentration, and charge – with unparalleled prec March 23rd, 2021

    Microscope that detects individual viruses could power rapid diagnostics March 19th, 2021

    Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique: Presentations at Photonics West 2021 Show How Early-Stage Imaging System’s Flexibility Can Be Applied Broadly in Medical Field March 18th, 2021

    Industrial

    New technique builds super-hard metals from nanoparticles January 22nd, 2021

    CEA-Leti Papers at IEDM 2020 Highlight Progress in Overcoming Challenges to Making GaN Energy-Saving, Power-Electronics Devices: Gallium Nitride Seen as Highly Efficient Replacement for Silicon In Wide Range of Consumer and Industrial Uses December 17th, 2020

    Nanomaterials enable dual-mode heating and cooling device: Device could cut HVAC energy use by nearly 20% in the US December 2nd, 2020

    Industrial-strength brine, meet your kryptonite: Boron nitride coating is key ingredient in hypersaline desalination technology November 6th, 2020

    Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
    Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56618

    Continue Reading

    Nano Technology

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life

    Avatar

    Published

    on

    Home > Press > Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life

    X-ray tomography images taken at Brookhaven National Lab show cracking of a particle in one electrode of a battery cell that used a conventional electrolyte (as seen on the left). The researchers found that using a novel electrolyte prevented most of this cracking (right).
Credits:Image: courtesy of the researchers
    X-ray tomography images taken at Brookhaven National Lab show cracking of a particle in one electrode of a battery cell that used a conventional electrolyte (as seen on the left). The researchers found that using a novel electrolyte prevented most of this cracking (right).
    Credits:Image: courtesy of the researchers

    Abstract:
    Lithium-ion batteries have made possible the lightweight electronic devices whose portability we now take for granted, as well as the rapid expansion of electric vehicle production. But researchers around the world are continuing to push limits to achieve ever-greater energy densities — the amount of energy that can be stored in a given mass of material — in order to improve the performance of existing devices and potentially enable new applications such as long-range drones and robots.

    Design could enable longer lasting, more powerful lithium batteries: Use of a novel electrolyte could allow advanced metal electrodes and higher voltages, boosting capacity and cycle life


    Cambridge, MA | Posted on March 26th, 2021

    One promising approach is the use of metal electrodes in place of the conventional graphite, with a higher charging voltage in the cathode. Those efforts have been hampered, however, by a variety of unwanted chemical reactions that take place with the electrolyte that separates the electrodes. Now, a team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere has found a novel electrolyte that overcomes these problems and could enable a significant leap in the power-per-weight of next-generation batteries, without sacrificing the cycle life.

    The research is reported today in the journal Nature Energy in a paper by MIT professors Ju Li, Yang Shao-Horn, and Jeremiah Johnson; postdoc Weijiang Xue; and 19 others at MIT, two national laboratories, and elsewhere. The researchers say the finding could make it possible for lithium-ion batteries, which now typically can store about 260 watt-hours per kilogram, to store about 420 watt-hours per kilogram. That would translate into longer ranges for electric cars and longer-lasting changes on portable devices.

    The basic raw materials for this electrolyte are inexpensive (though one of the intermediate compounds is still costly because it’s in limited use), and the process to make it is simple. So, this advance could be implemented relatively quickly, the researchers say.

    The electrolyte itself is not new, explains Johnson, a professor of chemistry. It was developed a few years ago by some members of this research team, but for a different application. It was part of an effort to develop lithium-air batteries, which are seen as the ultimate long-term solution for maximizing battery energy density. But there are many obstacles still facing the development of such batteries, and that technology may still be years away. In the meantime, applying that electrolyte to lithium-ion batteries with metal electrodes turns out to be something that can be achieved much more quickly.

    The new application of this electrode material was found “somewhat serendipitously,” after it had initially been developed a few years ago by Shao-Horn, Johnson, and others, in a collaborative venture aimed at lithium-air battery development.

    “There’s still really nothing that allows a good rechargeable lithium-air battery,” Johnson says. However, “we designed these organic molecules that we hoped might confer stability, compared to the existing liquid electrolytes that are used.” They developed three different sulfonamide-based formulations, which they found were quite resistant to oxidation and other degradation effects. Then, working with Li’s group, postdoc Xue decided to try this material with more standard cathodes instead.

    The type of battery electrode they have now used with this electrolyte, a nickel oxide containing some cobalt and manganese, “is the workhorse of today’s electric vehicle industry,” says Li, who is a professor of nuclear science and engineering and materials science and engineering.

    Because the electrode material expands and contracts anisotropically as it gets charged and discharged, this can lead to cracking and a breakdown in performance when used with conventional electrolytes. But in experiments in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory, the researchers found that using the new electrolyte drastically reduced these stress-corrosion cracking degradations.

    The problem was that the metal atoms in the alloy tended to dissolve into the liquid electrolyte, losing mass and leading to cracking of the metal. By contrast, the new electrolyte is extremely resistant to such dissolution. Looking at the data from the Brookhaven tests, Li says, it was “sort of shocking to see that, if you just change the electrolyte, then all these cracks are gone.” They found that the morphology of the electrolyte material is much more robust, and the transition metals “just don’t have as much solubility” in these new electrolytes.

    That was a surprising combination, he says, because the material still readily allows lithium ions to pass through — the essential mechanism by which batteries get charged and discharged — while blocking the other cations, known as transition metals, from entering. The accumulation of unwanted compounds on the electrode surface after many charging-discharging cycles was reduced more than tenfold compared to the standard electrolyte.

    “The electrolyte is chemically resistant against oxidation of high-energy nickel-rich materials, preventing particle fracture and stabilizing the positive electrode during cycling,” says Shao-Horn, a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering. “The electrolyte also enables stable and reversible stripping and plating of lithium metal, an important step toward enabling rechargeable lithium-metal batteries with energy two times that of the state-the-art lithium-ion batteries. This finding will catalyze further electrolyte search and designs of liquid electrolytes for lithium-metal batteries rivaling those with solid state electrolytes.”

    The next step is to scale the production to make it affordable. “We make it in one very easy reaction from readily available commercial starting materials,” Johnson says. Right now, the precursor compound used to synthesize the electrolyte is expensive, but he says, “I think if we can show the world that this is a great electrolyte for consumer electronics, the motivation to further scale up will help to drive the price down.”

    Because this is essentially a “drop in” replacement for an existing electrolyte and doesn’t require redesign of the entire battery system, Li says, it could be implemented quickly and could be commercialized within a couple of years. “There’s no expensive elements, it’s just carbon and fluorine. So it’s not limited by resources, it’s just the process,” he says.

    The research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation, and made use of facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory.

    ####

    For more information, please click here

    Contacts:
    Abby Abazorius
    MIT News Office
    617.253.2709

    Copyright © Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    If you have a comment, please Contact us.

    Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

    Bookmark:
    Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

    Related Links

    Paper: “Ultra-high-voltage Ni-rich layered cathodes in practical Li metal batteries enabled by a sulfonamide-based electrolyte.”:

    Related News Press

    News and information

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Graphene/ Graphite

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    A new industry standard for batteries: ultra-clean facility for graphene nanotube dispersions March 19th, 2021

    Scientists stabilize atomically thin boron for practical use March 12th, 2021

    Laboratories

    Advancement creates nanosized, foldable robots March 19th, 2021

    Building tough 3D nanomaterials with DNA: Columbia Engineers use DNA nanotechnology to create highly resilient synthetic nanoparticle-based materials that can be processed through conventional nanofabrication methods March 19th, 2021

    Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    Fast-acting, color-changing molecular probe senses when a material is about to fail March 25th, 2021

    Microscope that detects individual viruses could power rapid diagnostics March 19th, 2021

    Possible Futures

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Discoveries

    DNA–Metal double helix: Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires March 26th, 2021

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    Announcements

    INBRAIN Neuroelectronics raises over €14M to develop smart graphene-based neural implants for personalised therapies in brain disorders March 26th, 2021

    Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Releases Variable Magnetic Field Module accessory for Jupiter XR, Large Sample Atomic Force Microscope March 26th, 2021

    Controlling bubble formation on electrodes: Study finds the wettability of porous electrode surfaces is key to making efficient water-splitting or carbon-capturing systems March 26th, 2021

    180 Degree Capital Corp. Issues Second Open Letter to the Board and Shareholders of Enzo Biochem, Inc. March 26th, 2021

    Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

    DNA–Metal double helix: Single-stranded DNA as supramolecular template for highly organized palladium nanowires March 26th, 2021

    Pressure sensor with high sensitivity and linear response based on soft micropillared electrodes March 26th, 2021

    Fast-acting, color-changing molecular probe senses when a material is about to fail March 25th, 2021

    Microscope that detects individual viruses could power rapid diagnostics March 19th, 2021

    Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

    A new industry standard for batteries: ultra-clean facility for graphene nanotube dispersions March 19th, 2021

    Scientists stabilize atomically thin boron for practical use March 12th, 2021

    Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

    A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

    Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
    Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56619

    Continue Reading
    Esports3 days ago

    Free Fire World Series APK Download for Android

    Esports1 day ago

    C9 White Keiti Blackmail Scandal Explains Sudden Dismissal

    Esports3 days ago

    Dota 2: Top Mid Heroes of Patch 7.29

    Esports1 day ago

    Overwatch League 2021 Day 1 Recap

    Esports5 days ago

    Ludwig Closes Out Month-Long Streaming Marathon in First Place – Weekly Twitch Top 10s, April 5-11

    Esports1 day ago

    Fortnite: Epic Vaults Rocket Launchers, Cuddlefish & Explosive Bows From Competitive

    Esports4 days ago

    Position 5 Faceless Void is making waves in North American Dota 2 pubs after patch 7.29

    Esports5 days ago

    Fortnite Leak Teases Aloy Skin From Horizon Zero Dawn

    Esports5 days ago

    Fortnite: Patch Notes v16.20 – Off-Road Vehicle Mods, 50-Player Creative Lobbies, Bug Fixes & More

    Blockchain5 days ago

    Bitcoin Preis steigt auf über 60.000 USD, neues ATH wahrscheinlich

    Esports2 days ago

    Don’t Miss Out on the Rogue Energy x Esports Talk Giveaway!

    Esports3 days ago

    Capcom Reveals Ransomware Hack Came from Old VPN

    Esports2 days ago

    Fortnite: DreamHack Cash Cup Extra Europe & NA East Results

    Esports2 days ago

    Gamers Club and Riot Games Organize Women’s Valorant Circuit in Latin America

    Esports5 days ago

    League of Legends’ Patch 11.8 introduces Gwen, champion updates and new Skins

    Blockchain5 days ago

    Guide to Gambling with Ethereum Now and in the Future

    Blockchain5 days ago

    ETC Group notiert ersten Litecoin ETP an Deutscher Börse

    Esports3 days ago

    PSA: CSGO Fans Beware, Unfixed Steam Invite Hack Could Take Over Your PC.

    Blockchain5 days ago

    COPA verklagt Craig Wright wegen Bitcoin-Copyright

    Esports5 days ago

    shroud explains why bottom fragging in Valorant is no big deal

    Trending