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The Changing US EV Market — Podcast

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Zach is tryin’ to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director, chief editor, and CEO. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada, and Curaçao. Zach has long-term investments in Tesla [TSLA], NIO [NIO], Xpeng [XPEV], Ford [F], Amazon [AMZN], Piedmont Lithium [PLL], Lithium Americas [LAC], and Starbucks [SBUX]. But he does not offer (explicitly or implicitly) investment advice of any sort.

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/13/the-changing-us-ev-market-podcast/

Cleantech

Renewables = 21.6% of US Electricity in 1st Quarter, 25.5% in March

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Renewable energy’s contribution to United States electricity supply has been growing for years. In just the past three years, renewable energy’s share of US electricity generation in the first quarter of the year has grown by more than three percentage points, from 18.4% in Q1 2019 to 21.6% in Q1 2021.

Wind power has been the biggest source of growth, going from 7.2% to 9.7%.

Solar power also gave a significant boost, going from 2.0% to 3.1% — still a small share of overall electricity generation, but growing at a solid clip.

The month of March was notably better for wind and solar than earlier months in the quarter. As a result, the same comparisons for just the month of March (charts above) show wind power growing from 7.8% in 2019 to 12.6% in 2021 and solar power growing from 2.7% to 4.3%.

Hydropower’s share of US electricity generation actually declined a bit in those time periods. So did the share of electricity coming from natural gas and coal.

If we look over a longer timeframe, the growth offers a more uplifting view.

  • Solar power went from 0% in 2010 to 3.3% in 2020.
  • Wind power went from 2.3% in 2010 to 8.3% in 2020.
  • Renewables as a whole went from 10.4% in 2010 to 20.6% in 2020.

Charts below show changes from 2010 through 2020 by electricity source in two ways: 1) absolute electricity generation changes from year to year (all charts on the same scale), and 2) changes in percentage share of US electricity generation.

US solar-powered electricity growth from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Solar power’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US wind-powered electricity growth from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Wind power’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US electricity growth from renewables from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Renewable energy’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US coal-powered electricity decline from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Coal power’s decline in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US natural gas electricity growth from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Natural gas power’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

As indicated higher up in this article, the first quarter of 2021 looks better for renewables than the first quarter of 2019 or 2020. Also, US capacity additions have been coming almost 100% from solar and wind power. Therefore, it is clear that solar and wind power will see growth yet again in 2021 that will continue some of the trends above.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/renewables-21-6-of-us-electricity-in-1st-quarter-25-5-in-march/

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Cleantech

Renewables = 21.6% of US Electricity in 1st Quarter, 25.5% in March

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Renewable energy’s contribution to United States electricity supply has been growing for years. In just the past three years, renewable energy’s share of US electricity generation in the first quarter of the year has grown by more than three percentage points, from 18.4% in Q1 2019 to 21.6% in Q1 2021.

Wind power has been the biggest source of growth, going from 7.2% to 9.7%.

Solar power also gave a significant boost, going from 2.0% to 3.1% — still a small share of overall electricity generation, but growing at a solid clip.

The month of March was notably better for wind and solar than earlier months in the quarter. As a result, the same comparisons for just the month of March (charts above) show wind power growing from 7.8% in 2019 to 12.6% in 2021 and solar power growing from 2.7% to 4.3%.

Hydropower’s share of US electricity generation actually declined a bit in those time periods. So did the share of electricity coming from natural gas and coal.

If we look over a longer timeframe, the growth offers a more uplifting view.

  • Solar power went from 0% in 2010 to 3.3% in 2020.
  • Wind power went from 2.3% in 2010 to 8.3% in 2020.
  • Renewables as a whole went from 10.4% in 2010 to 20.6% in 2020.

Charts below show changes from 2010 through 2020 by electricity source in two ways: 1) absolute electricity generation changes from year to year (all charts on the same scale), and 2) changes in percentage share of US electricity generation.

US solar-powered electricity growth from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Solar power’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US wind-powered electricity growth from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Wind power’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US electricity growth from renewables from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Renewable energy’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US coal-powered electricity decline from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Coal power’s decline in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

US natural gas electricity growth from 2010 through 2020 (in GWh). The chart scale is the same as used in charts for all other electricity sources shown here.

Natural gas power’s growth in terms of share of US electricity produced from 2010–2020.

As indicated higher up in this article, the first quarter of 2021 looks better for renewables than the first quarter of 2019 or 2020. Also, US capacity additions have been coming almost 100% from solar and wind power. Therefore, it is clear that solar and wind power will see growth yet again in 2021 that will continue some of the trends above.


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.


 



 


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Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/renewables-21-6-of-us-electricity-in-1st-quarter-25-5-in-march/

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Cleantech

Jay Leno Breaks World Record In Tesla’s New Plaid Model S — “I Love This Car”

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Jay Leno broke the world acceleration record for a quarter mile in the new Tesla Model S Plaid. He is one of the few lucky ones to have driven the fastest production car ever made. Leno drove it down the dragstrip at Pomona Raceway in California, filming it for his show, Jay Leno’s Garage. The record Leno set is a new time for a quarter-mile ET of 9.247 seconds at 152.09 mph.

During a podcast on Spikes Car Radio, Leno affirmed that representatives from the National Hot Rod Association were there to make it official. CNBC had a preview from Leno’s show, which showed Tesla’s chief designer, Franz von Holzhausen, cheering as Leno broke the record.

“It was a winner,” Leno told CNBC. “It is now the fastest production car you can buy. It’s faster than any Ferrari; faster than any $3.5 million Bugatti.” Leno noted that the amazing part was how quiet the vehicle was. He broke the record near Bakersfield, where there is a lot of farmland. There were birds on a Christmas tree and normally the birds are gone when there’s some type of race — often scared off by the loud engines.

Leno explained that when the car came back around after reaching 152 mph, the birds were, shockingly, still there. “When I stepped on the accelerator, took off, and I came back down after going 152, the birds were still there. Just the fact that you can go that fast, that swiftly — you know, it’s pretty amazing. I’m a huge fan of American technology, especially products that are developed here in America that are using locally sourced stuff. And that’s why I love this car,” he said.

He also talked about the price of the newest Tesla vehicle. “$130,000 is a tremendous amount of money, but to get the same performance from an internal combustion engine, you would probably have to spend — in the case of Bugatti, $2.5 million; or a Ferrari, close to $1 million. It’s pretty amazing.”

Leno also described how he felt as he drove the new Tesla Plaid Model S. He has a lot of steam automobiles from the last century and steam has similar instant power as an electric motor. For infernal combustion engine vehicles, transmissions are needed. Electric vehicles don’t need a transmission.

“From the minute you step on the accelerator, boom you’re gone.” He noted the fact that you don’t need all the extra stuff that you would need with an ICE vehicle for an EV. “Steam ran everything from 1800 to 1911. From 1911 until now it’s an internal combustion engine. From now until the near future, it’s probably going to be electric or some form of electric hybrid.”


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.


 



 


Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/jay-leno-breaks-world-record-in-teslas-new-plaid-model-s-i-love-this-car/

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Cleantech

Jay Leno Breaks World Record In Tesla’s New Plaid Model S — “I Love This Car”

Published

on

Jay Leno broke the world acceleration record for a quarter mile in the new Tesla Model S Plaid. He is one of the few lucky ones to have driven the fastest production car ever made. Leno drove it down the dragstrip at Pomona Raceway in California, filming it for his show, Jay Leno’s Garage. The record Leno set is a new time for a quarter-mile ET of 9.247 seconds at 152.09 mph.

During a podcast on Spikes Car Radio, Leno affirmed that representatives from the National Hot Rod Association were there to make it official. CNBC had a preview from Leno’s show, which showed Tesla’s chief designer, Franz von Holzhausen, cheering as Leno broke the record.

“It was a winner,” Leno told CNBC. “It is now the fastest production car you can buy. It’s faster than any Ferrari; faster than any $3.5 million Bugatti.” Leno noted that the amazing part was how quiet the vehicle was. He broke the record near Bakersfield, where there is a lot of farmland. There were birds on a Christmas tree and normally the birds are gone when there’s some type of race — often scared off by the loud engines.

Leno explained that when the car came back around after reaching 152 mph, the birds were, shockingly, still there. “When I stepped on the accelerator, took off, and I came back down after going 152, the birds were still there. Just the fact that you can go that fast, that swiftly — you know, it’s pretty amazing. I’m a huge fan of American technology, especially products that are developed here in America that are using locally sourced stuff. And that’s why I love this car,” he said.

He also talked about the price of the newest Tesla vehicle. “$130,000 is a tremendous amount of money, but to get the same performance from an internal combustion engine, you would probably have to spend — in the case of Bugatti, $2.5 million; or a Ferrari, close to $1 million. It’s pretty amazing.”

Leno also described how he felt as he drove the new Tesla Plaid Model S. He has a lot of steam automobiles from the last century and steam has similar instant power as an electric motor. For infernal combustion engine vehicles, transmissions are needed. Electric vehicles don’t need a transmission.

“From the minute you step on the accelerator, boom you’re gone.” He noted the fact that you don’t need all the extra stuff that you would need with an ICE vehicle for an EV. “Steam ran everything from 1800 to 1911. From 1911 until now it’s an internal combustion engine. From now until the near future, it’s probably going to be electric or some form of electric hybrid.”


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.


 



 


Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/06/15/jay-leno-breaks-world-record-in-teslas-new-plaid-model-s-i-love-this-car/

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