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Cyber Security

The 4th of July and the State of Online Security

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American independence day 2017Reading Time: 3 minutes

Independence day 2017The Fourth of July is an opportunistic time for shoppers to buy products that are currently in season with the best deals. Name any big product and you are surely to find a good sale offer for the 241st Independence Day. As for any savvy shopper, now would be the most opportune moment to swipe their credit card and purchase whatever desired. Now, both the purchaser and the seller have to be wary about performing online transactions and card transactions due to evolving cyber security risks.

Latest Cyber Security Threats

It is quite alarming that the WannaCry and NotPetya ransomware/malware/wiper attacks transpired just a couple of weeks ago. On this same note, hackers may unleash a new wave of attacks over the Fourth of July holiday period.Countries have been specifically targeted as with the latest trend of attacks. During this year’s celebration, the possibility of targeted reprisal cyber attacks on US business and entities are quite high. Since many businesses in the US still accept payments through magnetic-stripe cards, such machines and networks could be targeted.

Large Card Data Breaches

Remember the massive Target card data breach attack in Dec. 19, 2013? Initially, Target confirmed that hackers had stolen the credit and debit card information of about 40 million customers. Later, this number went up to 70 million people, and along with the card data email and mailing addresses had been stolen. Target is to pay $18.5 million to 47 states as part of a settlement for the huge security breach.

Another popular attack was on HomeDepot, where the Point of Sale systems were compromised using exploitation methods similar to those used in the Target card data breach. In this attack, around 56 million payment card details had been stolen. In both these attacks, RAM scraping malware at compromised POS machines had grabbed the payment card data. In these cases, payment card skimmers had not been used but skimmers are widely used in other payment acceptance locations.

Mitigation Measures for Shoppers

Try to avoid using Magnetic Stripe payment cards – move on to an EMV Chip-and-PIN payment card which is considered more secure.

  • When making payments do not allow the card out of your sight
  • Do not divulge the PIN to anybody
  • When making purchases online ensure that the website is “https://” secure

SSL certificate

Mitigation Measures for Businesses During the Fourth of July Holidays

If you have understood the gravity of massive breaches such as Target and Home Depot, you would now be wary and know the importance of ensuring robust cyber security in protecting payment card data of your customers. The huge litigation costs, financial loss, and loss of reputation are a rather very heavy purchase to pay. There are measures that will enable secure and continued running of your business and it is recommended that you follow them.

Upgrade your POS system infrastructure to enable use of EMV Chip-and-PIN payment cards
Ensure Point-to-Point (P2P) encryption, (that would be securing your website with SSL technology.) If you need to accept card payments then your website must have SSL certificate.

You must protect your IT infrastructure – website, servers, network, computers and POS machines. Ensure updated security for all the devices connected to your network by installing a robust endpoint security solution.

Managing a large number of devices including POS devices, as well as ensuring updated security in those devices would be very difficult. Cyber security experts recommend the use of a Remote Monitoring and Management solution that not only makes management easy but also enables rapid response to cyber security threats.

Remote Monitoring Management

TEST YOUR EMAIL SECURITY GET YOUR INSTANT SECURITY SCORECARD FOR FREE Source: https://blog.comodo.com/cybersecurity/4th-july-state-online-security/

Cyber Security

Does A Cybersecurity Career Require Programming Skills

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Programming Skills
Programming Skills

Does A Cybersecurity Career Require Programming Skills- This is a question that our Training Consultants are frequently asked. The simple answer is that programming abilities are required for a cybersecurity career. However, the answer is contingent on your chosen cybersecurity speciality. The answer differs depending on whether you’re a management, an offensive or defensive cybersecurity professional.

Table of Contents

Offensive and Defensive Cybersecurity Need Programming skills

Programming skills are necessary for assessing software for flaws, identifying malicious software, and other activities that cyber security analysts must perform.

This question concerning programming knowledge for cybersecurity specialty was answered by Quora. The best answer explains how the programming and coding skills required differ depending on whether you work in online app security, software security, malware analysis, network security, or computer forensics. What you should take away from this is that knowing how to programme offers you an advantage over other security professionals who don’t.

Overall Technical Skills Wanted in Cybersecurity

System architectures, system administration, operating systems, networking, virtualization software, and other essential components of IT systems are all skills that the ideal cybersecurity expert possesses. A thorough understanding of system design lets you to see the overall picture and identify potential vulnerabilities, as well as how to defend all access points from assaults. The CompTIA Security+ certification assesses this broad variety of knowledge, but it does not imply that you can implement what you’ve learned.

Firewalls, network load balancers, network routers and switches, and network designs should all be configured and managed correctly. The use of networking and virtualization technologies is important to the success of enterprises. With the introduction of cloud computing, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), which is accessed via web browsers, necessitates a thorough grasp of security at this level. Whether your company has its own private cloud or hybrid infrastructure or has access to an external cloud infrastructure, intermediate to advanced level knowledge is required to succeed in today’s cybersecurity environment.

Programming Languages for Cybersecurity

This section isn’t meant to be a comprehensive list of the advantages of each programming language for a cybersecurity practitioner. For more information, you can read a variety of fantastic blog posts and articles available online with a simple Google search. It is critical to understand that the more languages you know, the better your cybersecurity job will be. Here are a few languages with which you can begin.

C/C++

Students inquire about the significance of programming knowledge in our Malware Analysis course. Students should have a “basic understanding of C/C++ and assembly language,” according to the course page’s recommended experience section. The majority of malware is created using the C++ programming language. This language is also necessary for reading and comprehending open source code, which frequently supports low-level system programmes that are crucial operating system components.

Python

Python is a high-level programming language that is less difficult to learn than other low-level scripting languages. Python has several advantages in the security field, including the ability to automate processes and do malware analysis. In the outline for our Python Security for Practitioners course, you may learn more about utilising Python as a tool.

When planning your career, you should obtain advice on skills, knowledge, possible job titles, and other relevant information. Then make a timetable of where you want to go, what you want to learn, and how you’re going to get there.

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Source: https://cybersguards.com/does-a-cybersecurity-career-require-programming-skills/

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Cyber Security

Apple Downplayed the Severity of the iCloud Account Takeover Vulnerability: Researcher

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Apple

A security researcher claims to have identified a significant issue in Apple’s password reset tool that could have been exploited to take control of any iCloud account, but Apple has downplayed the flaw’s significance.

According to researcher Laxman Muthiyah, the problem was a circumvention of Apple’s multiple security procedures designed to thwart attempts to brute force the “lost password” feature for Apple accounts.

When a user tries to reset their password, they are asked for their phone number or email address in order to acquire a 6-digit one-time passcode.

To gain access to the account, an attacker must first know the victim’s phone number or email address, then correctly guess the 6-digit code or be able to try all of the roughly 1 million possible combinations.

To avoid brute-forcing of this code, Apple set a restriction of 5 tries and a limit of 6 concurrent POST requests to the same server from the same IP address, implying that an attacker would need 28,000 IP addresses to send a million requests.

Apple has also banned cloud service providers and appears to automatically refuse POST requests from many of them, including Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud. However, according to the study, an attacker might send the queries via unblocked cloud services, allowing them to brute-force the 6-digit code and get access to the targeted iCloud account.

“Of course, the attack isn’t simple to carry out; we’ll need a good setup to exploit this vulnerability,” Muthiyah explained. “First, we must bypass the SMS 6 digit code, followed by the 6 digit code acquired via email. Because both bypasses use the same method and environment, we don’t need to do anything differently when attempting the second bypass. We can still access the account even if the user has two factor authentication enabled because the 2FA endpoint shares the rate limit and is vulnerable. The password validation endpoint also had the same vulnerability.”

Apple was notified of the issue on July 1, 2020, and a patch was released in April 2021. According to the researcher, Apple failed to contact him after the problem was resolved.

Furthermore, the tech giant assured him that only “a very small proportion of accounts were ever compromised, and incredibly few Apple device users were exposed.”

“This technique only works against Apple ID accounts that have never been used to log in on a password-protected iPhone, iPad, or Mac,” the company clarified, dismissing the researcher’s claim that all iCloud accounts are vulnerable.

According to Muthiyah, the corporation attempted to conceal the severity of the vulnerability by changing a related help website. Following his investigation on the vulnerability, he believes the change was implemented in October 2020.

The researcher even spoke with Apple’s security engineers about the problem, who told him that while passcodes are checked on the device rather being forwarded to Apple’s servers, the passcode validation endpoint had rate constraints that could not be evaded, blocking the attack. Muthiyah, on the other hand, believes the endpoint was vulnerable prior to his report and was patched in the interim.

“If they patched it after my disclosure, the vulnerability became far more serious than I had anticipated. We [would] be able to detect the right passcode by differentiating the responses by brute forcing the passcode. As a result, we can not only gain access to any iCloud account, but also learn the passcode of the Apple device that is linked to it. Even though the technique is difficult, if my theory is correct, this vulnerability might hack any iPhone / iPad with a 4 digit / 6 digit numeric passcode,” he claims.

However, the functionality is now unaffected, and the researcher’s allegations cannot be verified.

Apple offered the researcher a $18,000 bug bounty, but he declined, claiming that the firm understated the severity of the flaw and that he should have received $100,000 or even $350,0000 instead.

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Source: https://cybersguards.com/apple-downplayed-the-severity-of-the-icloud-account-takeover-vulnerability-researcher/

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Cybersecurity Degrees in Vermont

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Cybersecurity degrees in Vermont
Cybersecurity degrees in Vermont

Cybersecurity Degrees in Vermont- The purpose of this guide is to provide information on cybersecurity schools in Vermont. It also contains information about Vermont’s economic situation.

According to Forbes, Vermont, which is known for its maple syrup production, has the smallest economy in the United States, with a GDP of $35 billion. Vermont’s primary industries, such as agriculture, energy, manufacturing, and technology, compensate for its small size by maintaining a five-year average unemployment rate of 2.9 percent, the lowest among its competitors.

A varied array of enterprises that supply software, including IBM, one of the largest technology companies in the United States, are among its investments in software development and information technology across industries.

Jobs in the tech sector are expected to rise at a 7.5 percent annual rate from 2014 to 2022, according to Vermont data analysts. According to Vermont’s tourism website, tech professionals in Vermont create an estimated $5.6 billion in yearly compensation, earning more than 63 percent more than the state average.

Despite the state’s high business costs of 12 percent, the Agency of Commerce and Community Development continuously invests in new industries to attract enterprises and keep them expanding. Since 2018, the state has focused on revamping high schools and colleges to provide professional routes for students in high-growth areas such as manufacturing, construction, and cybersecurity.

Vermont’s investments in cybersecurity have grown quickly, offering new opportunities for employment engagement and economic growth as one of the few governments to adopt a complete economic development strategy.

Table of Contents

Growing Awareness of Cybersecurity in Vermont

Vermont’s key initiatives highlight an artificial intelligence task force as a critical component for the state’s protection against digital security breaches as part of the state’s overall economic development strategy for 2020. Its task team will look at artificial intelligence and how it may help Vermont’s technology sector expand sustainably.

Vermont earned a $1.5 million joint grant with Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, and Rhode Island, according to the state’s Office of Economic Adjustment Defense Industry. As part of its diversification efforts, the state will form the Increased England Regional Defense Industry Collaboration with the purpose of defending against cyber-attacks and creating defense-related enterprises to satisfy new cybersecurity needs and production targets.

Vermont’s development in education includes a collaboration with Norwich University to establish a Cybersecurity Operations Center, which is one of the state’s primary priorities. The centre will teach students how to defend against the state’s millions of digital attacks each year, as well as provide real-world training for future careers, such as federal posts with the Department of Defense. Governor Phil Scott also teamed up with the SANS Institute to launch the Girls Go CyberStart initiative, which teaches high school students about cybersecurity and career options.

The state’s Agency of Commerce & Community Development awarded NuHarbor Security $325,000 from the Vermont Training Program (VTP) and the Vermont Employment Growth Incentive (VEGI) programme to provide online learning and hands-on training to its employees, in addition to emphasising its initiatives on student engagement.

Cybersecurity Degrees in Vermont

Vermont’s Agency of Education offers a variety of academic options, collaborating with career and technical institutes to establish cybersecurity job pathways for high school and college students. Professional development events for teachers from specialised centres and universities are held on a regular basis to prepare them for Vermont’s Career Pathway in Cybersecurity programme.

Governor Scott stated, “Starting these projects now is especially critical because it will help mitigate the impact of retirements across Vermont’s sophisticated manufacturing business.” “In addition, cybersecurity is one of the country’s and the world’s fastest-growing industries. We have the opportunity to generate and recruit high-paying tech sector jobs through a competent, in-demand workforce by developing a K-16 cybersecurity career pipeline,” Governor Scott said.

ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

Students can receive an associate of science in information technology at the Community College of Vermont. Students in the information technology curriculum learn networking, programming, and operating systems, as well as have the option of focusing on one of three focus areas: networking, programming, or website building. Students will be able to use computer language to solve problems, manage software applications, and plan networking solutions after completing the programme.

Students can get an associate of science in computer information technology at Vermont Technical College. Students will learn how to design software systems, deploy secure data networks, and reinforce telecommunication infrastructures as part of this programme. Students who enrol in this degree programme will get knowledge of systems administration, web design, and programming fundamentals. Because the curriculum teaches students the fundamentals of programming, participants will be able to expand their technical knowledge into other fields.

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

Students at Norwich University have a variety of opportunities for starting and continuing their study in computer science, information technology, and cybersecurity. Students interested in obtaining a well-rounded degree in the information technology field can pursue a bachelor of science in cybersecurity, commonly known as a computer security and information assurance degree, at the institution.

Students seeking a cybersecurity degree at Norwich will use core digital forensics, information assurance, and digital incident investigation procedures, as well as grasp cyber-law and cyber-crime, and employ programming languages to tackle network defence problems. On-campus and online courses are available in the bachelor’s degree programme, with concentrations and minors in forensics, information assurance management, computer forensics and vulnerability management, and information warfare and security management available in both segments.

Along with Norwich, The University of Vermont offers a generalist focus in information systems and computer science, with two degrees available in computer science and information systems and computer science. Programming, database design, data structure, algorithms, and data analysis are all covered in both degrees. The information systems component of the computer science and information systems degree focuses on business administration and economics, whereas the computer science degree focuses on programming as a foundation for subsequent degrees. Computer science is also available as a minor at the University of Vermont, which can be combined with other majors.

At the bachelor’s degree level, Champlain College offers four options. For adult students, there is an on-campus degree in Computer Networking & Cybersecurity as well as an online degree in Cybersecurity. The National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have designated both programmes as Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyberdefense Education (DHS). Champlain College now provides an on-campus Computer and Digital Forensics degree as well as an online Computer Forensics and Digital Investigations degree. The Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center has designated both programmes as National Centers for Digital Forensics Academic Excellence (DC3). Students in both majors work in the Leahy Center for Digital Forensics and Cybersecurity at Champlain College. Since its inception in 2010, the Leahy Center for Digital Forensics & Cybersecurity has become Champlain College’s principal hub for digital forensics and cybersecurity. It’s a world-class laboratory with cutting-edge equipment that offers digital forensics and cybersecurity services to a wide range of clients, from government agencies to small enterprises. All students enrolled in an on-campus degree programme at Champlain College can take a Cybersecurity Minor or a Digital Forensics Minor.

Students can earn a bachelor’s degree in computer information technology from Vermont Technical College. The degree programme provides a stronger technical grounding in programming software systems, analysing and interpreting databases, and managing technological infrastructures for higher education, similar to the associate’s degree.

MASTER’S DEGREE

Students interested in advancing their skills in the theoretical fundamentals of cybersecurity can pursue an online master’s degree in cybersecurity at Norwich University.

The master’s programme will teach you how to manage computer assets, respond to incidents, and conduct forensic investigations, as well as how to use such abilities in a complex business setting. Project management, vulnerability assessments, cyber legislation, and forensic investigation are among the concentrations available in the degree programme.

Champlain College offers two master’s degrees in information security and digital forensics that can be completed entirely online. Students who complete an information security degree programme learn to analyse information technology risks, conduct vulnerability assessments, comprehend cyber law, and implement security management processes. The cyberlaw component of the digital forensics programme teaches students about digital investigations, operating systems, cyber law principles, and digital encryption.

Cybersecurity Certifications in Vermont

Colleges in Vermont offer a variety of undergraduate and graduate certificate programmes for individuals interested in advancing their careers in cybersecurity and information systems. Champlain College offers a variety of credentials spanning from cybersecurity to information security to students. Graduate credentials in cybersecurity forensics, cyberlaw, and international perspectives are available from Norwich University.

Cybersecurity Jobs in Vermont

According to Cyberseek, the cybersecurity profession now employs roughly 1,766 people in Vermont, with 628 job vacancies.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average hourly income for a cybersecurity analyst in Vermont is $38.66, with an annual average wage of $80,420.

Cybersecurity in Vermont

Vermont continues to invest in educational incentives to encourage institutions to offer a diverse range of cybersecurity degree programmes to future students, allowing the state’s technology sector to grow. Through digital security measures and enhanced software development, the state’s cybersecurity remains an ever-expanding promise for attracting business enterprises, generating gross domestic revenue, and improving the lives of Vermont’s residents.

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Source: https://cybersguards.com/cybersecurity-degrees-in-vermont/

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Cybersecurity Degrees in Arizona

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Cybersecurity Degrees in Arizona
Cybersecurity Degrees in Arizona

Cybersecurity Degrees in Arizona- This resource covers all of Arizona’s cybersecurity-related educational and professional possibilities. A look at specific cybersecurity degree possibilities in the state, as well as how local and regional economic developments may effect employment options, is included in the following material.

The majority of people associate Arizona with desert golf courses and retirement homes. However, Arizona’s economy has been one of the fastest-growing in the country for several years. Education, healthcare, and construction are leading the way in terms of job creation and personal income. And this fast-paced expansion, which is substantially above the national average, is anticipated to continue in the coming years.

The top employers in Arizona’s economy in 2019 were, in order of size, trade, transportation, and utilities; education and healthcare services; professional and business services; and government, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While all businesses are now vulnerable to cyber attacks, healthcare, commercial services, and government are among the most visible targets. As a result, these businesses are also among the most active users of cybersecurity services. It also explains why Arizona has over 20,000 cybersecurity professionals on staff.

Arizona is currently not one of the most active providers of cybersecurity-related educational programmes. The state government, on the other hand, has made cybersecurity a top priority for the future and is taking steps to ensure that Arizona is one of the top providers of cybersecurity talent.

There are a lot of good options for cybersecurity experts who want to continue their education. To remain a leader, though, Arizona’s colleges and universities will need to expand their degree and credential programmes. This is likely to happen during the next several years.

Table of Contents

Growing Importance of Cybersecurity in Arizona

Arizona’s governor signed an executive order in 2018 to establish the Arizona Cybersecurity Team, or ACT. The team, which includes specialists from the state, local, and federal governments, as well as the commercial sector and higher institutions, has a three-pronged approach.

First and foremost, ACT is responsible for defending Arizonans from cyber-attacks. Second, the group will try to recruit top cybersecurity experts to Arizona. Finally, ACT will encourage educators to develop degree and certification programmes that will result in a continuous supply of elite talent.

While the state government may have been a little late to the game than other states, it appears to be just as committed to making Arizona a desirable location for cybersecurity businesses and specialists.

Cybersecurity Degrees in Arizona

To date, Arizona colleges and universities have built a reasonably robust collection of degree programmes for students and professionals interested in cybersecurity. All degrees are offered, particularly for state residents who can attend on-campus forms. And students who live in the state will find a fast expanding job market with an insufficient number of competent applicants for open positions. However, considering the current scale of the state’s cybersecurity community and the goal of becoming an information security leader, more possibilities might be expected.

Because the Arizona Cybersecurity Team has only been in place for a little over a year, any influence it will have is yet to be seen. If successful, ACT should encourage Arizona’s educational institutions to act quickly to expand the number of cybersecurity degrees and certifications available.

ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

Cybersecurity was once thought to be a backroom job by hooded 20-something hackers. This isn’t the case anymore. The industry has evolved into a far more complex profession in recent years.

Most information security employment paths now require a bachelor’s degree. However, there are still plenty of entry-level job positions that require an associate’s degree, thanks to a shortage of qualified experts. An associate’s degree might be a suitable first step for those who don’t have the time or means to complete a full four-year degree programme. It’s a good idea to pursue a bachelor’s degree after landing an entry-level job and gaining some experience. Coursework from an associate’s degree can normally be applied to bachelor’s degree requirements to speed up the process of earning a second degree.

Campus-based associate’s degrees in Arizona

There are now four options for earning an associate’s degree in cybersecurity at Arizona community colleges. Puma Community College offers two of these choices. All four degree programmes are available on campus, and there are no online choices for associate’s degrees offered by Arizona educational institutions at this time. The four current degree tracks are shown in the table below.

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

Most cybersecurity employment choices now demand a bachelor’s degree as a baseline prerequisite. Of course, a bachelor’s degree in cybersecurity is ideal, but other majors can be just as appealing to companies. Certain cybersecurity occupations can also benefit from a solid foundation in computer science, information technology, or any of the typical STEM courses of study. If you prefer a bachelor’s degree in cybersecurity, there are a growing number of choices available, both on campus and online.

Campus-based bachelor’s degrees in Arizona

On-campus bachelor’s degree alternatives are currently available at five Arizona higher education institutions. The University of Advancing Technology, in Tempe, Arizona, offers three of these programmes. See the table below for a complete list of campus-based possibilities.

Online bachelor’s degrees in Arizona

At the moment, Arizona colleges and universities offer two bachelor’s degree options in cybersecurity. The University of Advancing Technology offers an online network security BS degree programme. A BAS degree in cyber operations is available from the University of Arizona.

MASTER’S DEGREE

Cybersecurity professionals who want to advance their careers and work in senior and management-level information security jobs should devote the time and resources necessary to earn a master’s degree in cybersecurity. A master’s degree is often required for top information security positions, such as chief information security officer. A master’s degree is also required for those choosing a different professional route, such as academia, research, or cybersecurity consultancy.

Campus-Based Master’s Degrees in Arizona

As shown in the chart below, Arizona colleges and institutions now offer four master’s degree programmes in cybersecurity in on-campus presentations. Three of these alternatives are supplied by state institutions (two by Arizona State University and one by the University of Arizona), suggesting that the state government’s effort to make Arizona a cybersecurity leader is gaining traction.

Online master’s degrees in Arizona

Of the three online master’s degree programs in cybersecurity available from Arizona institutions, two are offered by the University of Arizona. See below for more information and links.

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Source: https://cybersguards.com/cybersecurity-degrees-in-arizona/

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