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THCV From Cannabis Might Be Best Bet For Treating Diabetes

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The diabetes issue is one of the many growing health problems in the US, and beyond, spurred on, no doubt, by modern food systems, and generally unhealthy lifestyles. Though taking a medication will never take the place of healthy living behaviors, cannabis compound THCV might be the best bet for treating the symptoms of diabetes.

For those with weight issues, using THCV for help with diabetes symptoms, might be the best bet. Cannabis and Hemp provides tons of useful medical and recreational compounds like THCV, Delta 10, THC-O and Delta-8 THC. This alternate form of THC produces less psychoactive effect, less couch locking, and less anxiety, while providing nearly all the benefits of delta-9. We believe in making sure people get the products they need. Take a look at our selection of Delta-8 THC products, as well as THCV, and many more compounds, to find the right product for you.

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What is diabetes?

Diabetes, technically called diabetes mellitus, is an entire grouping of metabolic disorders that relate to elevated blood sugar levels over time, and a lack of insulin. Diabetes is the root of many other health issues, and when left untreated, can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke, the need to amputate body parts, and even death. Here are the different kinds of diabetes, though all types deal with the inability to produce enough insulin, or the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.

  • Type I – Often known as ‘juvenile diabetes’, this type of diabetes is a result of an autoimmune response which causes the death of beta cells in the pancreas. Beta cells are responsible for synthesizing and secreting insulin, which means in these cases, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, and those with this disorder require insulin from outside in order to survive. Why the autoimmune response happens that causes the loss of beta cells, is unknown. This type of diabetes is often referred to as ‘insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus’.
  • Type II – Often called ‘adult-onset diabetes’, this disorder has to do with insulin resistance, in which case cells don’t respond to the insulin around them appropriately. Progression of type II diabetes can lead to a lack of insulin overall. This type of diabetes is generally caused by being overweight or not getting enough exercise (or a combination of the two.) Since it doesn’t relate to an actual inability of the body to produce insulin, its called ‘non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus’.

What is THCV?

At this point, whether a person agrees or not, it should be well understood that the cannabis plant is being looked to as a remedy for a number of different health concerns, with varying amounts of research, historical evidence, and anecdotal data to back up claims. But this doesn’t mean every part of the plant is good for everything, and sometimes it takes researching different compounds within a plant to establish which parts can be beneficial, and for what.

As it turns out, one of the newer cannabinoids to make headlines recently, and enter into the unregulated cannabis market of America, is THCV. So, what is this compound? THCV stands for tetrahydrocannabivarin, and it’s a homologue of delta-9 THC. This means it differs from delta-9 in terms of a repeating unit, but is otherwise the same. In this case it has to do with propyl side chains. Delta-9 has three carbon atom side chain, whereas THCV has a five carbon atom chain. This difference in the number of carbon atoms in the chain, makes for two compounds which a body responds to differently. THCV is a CB1 antagonist, and a CB2 partial agonist. This means, it disrupts – or interferes with – actions at the CB1 receptors, and binds to CB2 receptors where it can activate it, but not fully. In contrast, delta-9 is a CB1 agonist.

THCV does not start as THCA – like delta-9, but rather has a precursor of CBGVA (cannabigerovarin acid). This then breaks down to THCVA (tetrahydrocannabivarin carboxylic acid), which is then decarboxylated to form THCV.

Cannabis & THCV for diabetes

There are a couple things about THCV that make it a possible answer for the growing diabetes problem. The first thing about THCV is that it can effect appetite. Most of us are aware of the phenomenon of ‘munchies’ whereby you smoke a little pot and then get insanely hungry, sometimes to ridiculous and inhuman levels. This effect can often cause people to overeat, because the delta-9 THC is acting as an agonist at the CB1 receptor.

Conversely, THCV is an antagonist at the CB1 receptor, and has shown to reduce hunger, thereby reducing food intake (or the desire for food intake). While it hasn’t undergone testing in humans, it has shown hypophagia effects in mice, meaning it can suppress appetite and food intake. This was true in mice that had, and had not, eaten. It was found in this study: Synthetic and plant-derived cannabinoid receptor antagonists show hypophagic properties in fasted and non-fasted mice, that food suppression continued for 6-8 hours after administration, with the same results for four days straight.

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No rebound effect was noticed, meaning the animals went back to their regular feeding routine by the next day. It was found however, that when a THCV-rich extract was used (as opposed to pure THCV), the hunger and food intake suppression didn’t happen, which the scientists expect might have been because of residual amounts of delta-9, which impacted the THCV’s ability to work.

THCV has shown yet another useful property for dealing with diabetes, particularly as it relates to obesity. THCV seems to have properties that can help with the glucose intolerance often experienced by obese people. Once again done with mouse models, this study: The cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) ameliorates insulin sensitivity in two mouse models of obesity highlights how THCV can affect insulin resistance.

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Why do we care if THCV is good for treating diabetes?

To give an idea of why this condition deserves some extra attention, according to the World Health Organization:

  • The number of worldwide diabetes cases rose from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. Considering that obesity levels have increased threefold since 1975 on a global level, with a staggering 42.4% of the US population weighing in at obese levels in 2017-2018, the expected number of diabetes cases will only rise from here.
  • There was a 5% increase in premature death rates between 2000-2016 due to diabetes.
  • In 2019 alone, there were approximately 1.5 million deaths directly related to diabetes.
  • In 2012 alone, 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood sugar levels.

When looking just at the US, according to diabetes.org:

  • As of 2018 numbers, about 10.5% of the US population has diabetes, which equals about 34.2 million people. Of these cases, only 1.6 million relate to type I diabetes, and the rest denote cases that exist purely because of bad health issues.
  • Only about 26.8 million of the previous number have been diagnosed. The rest are undiagnosed cases.
  • There are approximately 1.5 million new diagnosed cases per year.
  • As of 2015, 88 million people in America have prediabetes.
  • In 2017, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the US, accounting for 83,564 deaths where diabetes was named as an underlying factor on the death certificate, and a total of 270,702 death certificates that year which mentioned diabetes as a cause of death.
  • The previous bullet point only relates to reported diabetic deaths, whereas studies have found that as many as 60% of diabetic deaths may never be attributed properly to the disease, making it highly underreported.
  • The total cost of dealing with diagnosed diabetes is approximately $327 billion per year, based on numbers from 2017.

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Conclusion

That the world is getting fatter at break neck speeds is something we all kind of know. It’s everywhere around us. In the extra-large size clothing, in the horribly unhealthy food (and increasingly large portions of it), in the lack of exercise and sedentary lifestyles, and in the expanding waistlines that just seem to expand out further.

Technically, we don’t need a cannabis compound, we need to eat better and exercise more. But people don’t always have the time or education be as healthy as they should, and for this reason, having something that can aid those having issues, becomes more crucial. In a better world, we’d make sure people were actually taking care of themselves appropriately. In this one, we’re lucky to have cannabis compounds like THCV, which offer help for those suffering from ailments like diabetes.

Welcome to CBDtesters.co, your best online location for the most relevant and interesting cannabis-related news from around the globe. Give us a read-thru every day to stay on top of the ever-changing universe of legal cannabis, and sign up to get our newsletter, so you always know what’s going on.

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Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/07/26/thcv-from-cannabis-might-be-best-bet-for-treating-diabetes/

Cannabis

Uruguay Planning to Open Cannabis Tourism Market

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Uruguay was the first country in modern times to take the plunge and legalize recreational cannabis, which it did back in 2013. Now, Uruguay is looking to up the ante with plans to open a cannabis tourism market to bolster the industry further.

Uruguay is looking to step up its recreational cannabis legalization by opening a cannabis tourism market. Pretty cool, huh? The bigger the industry gets, the more products available to consumers, and this means more great additions like delta-8 THC, THCA, and CBN, and more places to use them. The world of weed is getting wider, and you can benefit. Check out our array of deals for delta-8 THC along with many other compounds, such as  delta 10 THCVTHC-OHHC and even hemp-derived delta-9 THC. Subscribe below and take advantage of the growing list of available products:

Liberalism in Uruguay

Uruguay was the first country to legalize the use of recreational cannabis, creating the world’s first adult-use market in 2013. This happened when then-President Jose Mujica officially signed legislation in December of that year. Prior to this time, Uruguay was still one of the more liberal countries when it came to drug laws, having decriminalized all drugs back in 1974 for personal use.

When that law was enacted (law 14.294), it did not specify how much accounted for personal use – called a ‘minimum quantity’, and judges were left to make that assessment on a case-by-case basis. Growing, selling, and any sort of trafficking crime, were still illegal at that time. In 1998 the law was updated with a change in language from ‘minimum quantity’ which it had been since 1974, to ‘reasonable quantity’, a similarly non-specific term for how much a person can possess without criminal penalties. This law also reduced the consequences for offenders caught growing and selling cannabis illegally.

It’s probably good to point out that Uruguay has consistently been more liberal than other South American countries, which might explain how it got to legalization, when no one else had. Latin America is generally seen as a very Christian area, where there is sometimes a large connection between church and state. In the case of Uruguay, that connection was severed back in 1918. Similarly, women were given the right to vote as early as 1932. Uruguay even holds the designation of being one of only three countries in Latin America to allow abortion, first decriminalizing it in 2008, and then legalizing it without question in the first trimester, in 2012. That same year, the country voted in same sex marriage, with a full legalization in 2013.

Whereas Canada, and many US states, legalized for similar reasons, no other legalized location has instituted a government-run model, and in no other case has the price of cannabis been kept so low. As of early 2020, the price for a gram was about $1.23 USD, far less than anywhere else. To be clear, users aren’t given a large array of strains to choose from, and none of them are high-THC. Even so, by early 2020, approximately 41,000 users were registered, there were over 8,000 home-growers, 158 cannabis clubs had popped up with a combined total of about 5,000 members, and users have three clear legal avenues to obtain cannabis: pharmacies, self-cultivation, and cannabis clubs. According to 2020 statistics, May 2020 saw the sale of approximately 87,000 grams, and April 2020 had sales of nearly 100,000 grams.

Uruguay and a new plan for a cannabis tourism market

Uruguay wants to further control the issue of the black market in the country, and has proposed a way to do both that, and to bolster the cannabis industry further. The new plan for Uruguay is to open a cannabis tourism market, to keep visitors coming into the country from buying black market weed. Uruguay has done a lot to limit the black market, but gangs still prevail, and the black market still claimed as much as 89% of cannabis business in 2020. Plus, the country has yet to reach $10 million USD in exports, partly challenged by a growing international market with tons of competition.

To be fair, exports did more than double by 2020, to hit $7.5 million, but this is far less than the hoped for hundreds of millions which never materialized (and which was a bit unrealistic to begin with.) According to secretary general of the National Drugs Board, Daniel Radio, “I think there was excessive optimism regarding the possibilities of growth, because we aren’t playing alone here.” He went on to say, “Some investment is showing up in manufacturing and value-added processes. That has to be our bet, because it’s the only way Uruguay can be competitive.”

Medical cannabis tourism

Uruguay isn’t the only country interested in a cannabis tourism market, in fact, it’s becoming all the rage. For years, Amsterdam held the title for the biggest cannabis tourism destination, but there are plenty of others, from Christiana in Copenhagen, Denmark, to Spain with its selection of cannabis clubs. Plenty of countries are also using the medical aspect to open medical cannabis tourism markets.

Last year, Thailand became the first Asian country to legalize medical cannabis, and though the country doesn’t seem to have any immediate intentions to go recreational, it is trying to build a medical cannabis tourism industry. As per Marut Jirasrattasiri, the Department of Thai Traditional and Alternative Medicine Director, “Thailand is already a tourist destination for many foreigners, and marijuana will be another attraction for the country and for medical tourists.” In order to make this happen, draft legislation was created to allow foreigners access to Thai medical cannabis clinics, and possibly allow medical patients to bring their own cannabis with them.

The US Virgin Islands, also has its eye on grabbing the medical cannabis tourism market. Medical cannabis was made legal in the Virgin Islands in 2019, with provisions in the bill which allow for patients coming from locations with legalized cannabis, to access care in the Virgin Islands for a fee. The same bill also made it open to patients unable to access cannabis medicine in their home country, to enter treatment in an in-house cannabis treatment program.

religious legalization, and that legalization extends to using cannabis freely in religious environments. Also a major point of interest for tourists, with the two combining to form a great basis for cannabis tourism in general.

Conclusion

Will Uruguay really embrace a new cannabis tourism market? Considering the country has already shown its willing to break with international and regional code when it comes to many subjects, and as it has already positioned itself as a trailblazer in cannabis legalization, it’s looking pretty promising. And who would expect less from the country that started it all, then to have a new innovative way to grow its industry?

Hi there! Welcome to CBDtesters.co, your #1 online spot for the most thought-provoking and interesting cannabis and psychedelics-related news worldwide. Check the site out regularly to stay on-top of the ever-changing universe of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up to receive our newsletter, so you never miss a story.

Have You Tried The New High-Potency THCP Vape Cartridges?

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/17/uruguay-planning-to-open-cannabis-tourism-market/

Continue Reading

Cannabis

Uruguay Planning to Open Cannabis Tourism Market

Published

on

Uruguay was the first country in modern times to take the plunge and legalize recreational cannabis, which it did back in 2013. Now, Uruguay is looking to up the ante with plans to open a cannabis tourism market to bolster the industry further.

Uruguay is looking to step up its recreational cannabis legalization by opening a cannabis tourism market. Pretty cool, huh? The bigger the industry gets, the more products available to consumers, and this means more great additions like delta-8 THC, THCA, and CBN, and more places to use them. The world of weed is getting wider, and you can benefit. Check out our array of deals for delta-8 THC along with many other compounds, such as  delta 10 THCVTHC-OHHC and even hemp-derived delta-9 THC. Subscribe below and take advantage of the growing list of available products:

Liberalism in Uruguay

Uruguay was the first country to legalize the use of recreational cannabis, creating the world’s first adult-use market in 2013. This happened when then-President Jose Mujica officially signed legislation in December of that year. Prior to this time, Uruguay was still one of the more liberal countries when it came to drug laws, having decriminalized all drugs back in 1974 for personal use.

When that law was enacted (law 14.294), it did not specify how much accounted for personal use – called a ‘minimum quantity’, and judges were left to make that assessment on a case-by-case basis. Growing, selling, and any sort of trafficking crime, were still illegal at that time. In 1998 the law was updated with a change in language from ‘minimum quantity’ which it had been since 1974, to ‘reasonable quantity’, a similarly non-specific term for how much a person can possess without criminal penalties. This law also reduced the consequences for offenders caught growing and selling cannabis illegally.

It’s probably good to point out that Uruguay has consistently been more liberal than other South American countries, which might explain how it got to legalization, when no one else had. Latin America is generally seen as a very Christian area, where there is sometimes a large connection between church and state. In the case of Uruguay, that connection was severed back in 1918. Similarly, women were given the right to vote as early as 1932. Uruguay even holds the designation of being one of only three countries in Latin America to allow abortion, first decriminalizing it in 2008, and then legalizing it without question in the first trimester, in 2012. That same year, the country voted in same sex marriage, with a full legalization in 2013.

Whereas Canada, and many US states, legalized for similar reasons, no other legalized location has instituted a government-run model, and in no other case has the price of cannabis been kept so low. As of early 2020, the price for a gram was about $1.23 USD, far less than anywhere else. To be clear, users aren’t given a large array of strains to choose from, and none of them are high-THC. Even so, by early 2020, approximately 41,000 users were registered, there were over 8,000 home-growers, 158 cannabis clubs had popped up with a combined total of about 5,000 members, and users have three clear legal avenues to obtain cannabis: pharmacies, self-cultivation, and cannabis clubs. According to 2020 statistics, May 2020 saw the sale of approximately 87,000 grams, and April 2020 had sales of nearly 100,000 grams.

Uruguay and a new plan for a cannabis tourism market

Uruguay wants to further control the issue of the black market in the country, and has proposed a way to do both that, and to bolster the cannabis industry further. The new plan for Uruguay is to open a cannabis tourism market, to keep visitors coming into the country from buying black market weed. Uruguay has done a lot to limit the black market, but gangs still prevail, and the black market still claimed as much as 89% of cannabis business in 2020. Plus, the country has yet to reach $10 million USD in exports, partly challenged by a growing international market with tons of competition.

To be fair, exports did more than double by 2020, to hit $7.5 million, but this is far less than the hoped for hundreds of millions which never materialized (and which was a bit unrealistic to begin with.) According to secretary general of the National Drugs Board, Daniel Radio, “I think there was excessive optimism regarding the possibilities of growth, because we aren’t playing alone here.” He went on to say, “Some investment is showing up in manufacturing and value-added processes. That has to be our bet, because it’s the only way Uruguay can be competitive.”

Medical cannabis tourism

Uruguay isn’t the only country interested in a cannabis tourism market, in fact, it’s becoming all the rage. For years, Amsterdam held the title for the biggest cannabis tourism destination, but there are plenty of others, from Christiana in Copenhagen, Denmark, to Spain with its selection of cannabis clubs. Plenty of countries are also using the medical aspect to open medical cannabis tourism markets.

Last year, Thailand became the first Asian country to legalize medical cannabis, and though the country doesn’t seem to have any immediate intentions to go recreational, it is trying to build a medical cannabis tourism industry. As per Marut Jirasrattasiri, the Department of Thai Traditional and Alternative Medicine Director, “Thailand is already a tourist destination for many foreigners, and marijuana will be another attraction for the country and for medical tourists.” In order to make this happen, draft legislation was created to allow foreigners access to Thai medical cannabis clinics, and possibly allow medical patients to bring their own cannabis with them.

The US Virgin Islands, also has its eye on grabbing the medical cannabis tourism market. Medical cannabis was made legal in the Virgin Islands in 2019, with provisions in the bill which allow for patients coming from locations with legalized cannabis, to access care in the Virgin Islands for a fee. The same bill also made it open to patients unable to access cannabis medicine in their home country, to enter treatment in an in-house cannabis treatment program.

religious legalization, and that legalization extends to using cannabis freely in religious environments. Also a major point of interest for tourists, with the two combining to form a great basis for cannabis tourism in general.

Conclusion

Will Uruguay really embrace a new cannabis tourism market? Considering the country has already shown its willing to break with international and regional code when it comes to many subjects, and as it has already positioned itself as a trailblazer in cannabis legalization, it’s looking pretty promising. And who would expect less from the country that started it all, then to have a new innovative way to grow its industry?

Hi there! Welcome to CBDtesters.co, your #1 online spot for the most thought-provoking and interesting cannabis and psychedelics-related news worldwide. Check the site out regularly to stay on-top of the ever-changing universe of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up to receive our newsletter, so you never miss a story.

Have You Tried The New High-Potency THCP Vape Cartridges?

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/17/uruguay-planning-to-open-cannabis-tourism-market/

Continue Reading

Cannabis

Uruguay Planning to Open Cannabis Tourism Market

Published

on

Uruguay was the first country in modern times to take the plunge and legalize recreational cannabis, which it did back in 2013. Now, Uruguay is looking to up the ante with plans to open a cannabis tourism market to bolster the industry further.

Uruguay is looking to step up its recreational cannabis legalization by opening a cannabis tourism market. Pretty cool, huh? The bigger the industry gets, the more products available to consumers, and this means more great additions like delta-8 THC, THCA, and CBN, and more places to use them. The world of weed is getting wider, and you can benefit. Check out our array of deals for delta-8 THC along with many other compounds, such as  delta 10 THCVTHC-OHHC and even hemp-derived delta-9 THC. Subscribe below and take advantage of the growing list of available products:

Liberalism in Uruguay

Uruguay was the first country to legalize the use of recreational cannabis, creating the world’s first adult-use market in 2013. This happened when then-President Jose Mujica officially signed legislation in December of that year. Prior to this time, Uruguay was still one of the more liberal countries when it came to drug laws, having decriminalized all drugs back in 1974 for personal use.

When that law was enacted (law 14.294), it did not specify how much accounted for personal use – called a ‘minimum quantity’, and judges were left to make that assessment on a case-by-case basis. Growing, selling, and any sort of trafficking crime, were still illegal at that time. In 1998 the law was updated with a change in language from ‘minimum quantity’ which it had been since 1974, to ‘reasonable quantity’, a similarly non-specific term for how much a person can possess without criminal penalties. This law also reduced the consequences for offenders caught growing and selling cannabis illegally.

It’s probably good to point out that Uruguay has consistently been more liberal than other South American countries, which might explain how it got to legalization, when no one else had. Latin America is generally seen as a very Christian area, where there is sometimes a large connection between church and state. In the case of Uruguay, that connection was severed back in 1918. Similarly, women were given the right to vote as early as 1932. Uruguay even holds the designation of being one of only three countries in Latin America to allow abortion, first decriminalizing it in 2008, and then legalizing it without question in the first trimester, in 2012. That same year, the country voted in same sex marriage, with a full legalization in 2013.

Whereas Canada, and many US states, legalized for similar reasons, no other legalized location has instituted a government-run model, and in no other case has the price of cannabis been kept so low. As of early 2020, the price for a gram was about $1.23 USD, far less than anywhere else. To be clear, users aren’t given a large array of strains to choose from, and none of them are high-THC. Even so, by early 2020, approximately 41,000 users were registered, there were over 8,000 home-growers, 158 cannabis clubs had popped up with a combined total of about 5,000 members, and users have three clear legal avenues to obtain cannabis: pharmacies, self-cultivation, and cannabis clubs. According to 2020 statistics, May 2020 saw the sale of approximately 87,000 grams, and April 2020 had sales of nearly 100,000 grams.

Uruguay and a new plan for a cannabis tourism market

Uruguay wants to further control the issue of the black market in the country, and has proposed a way to do both that, and to bolster the cannabis industry further. The new plan for Uruguay is to open a cannabis tourism market, to keep visitors coming into the country from buying black market weed. Uruguay has done a lot to limit the black market, but gangs still prevail, and the black market still claimed as much as 89% of cannabis business in 2020. Plus, the country has yet to reach $10 million USD in exports, partly challenged by a growing international market with tons of competition.

To be fair, exports did more than double by 2020, to hit $7.5 million, but this is far less than the hoped for hundreds of millions which never materialized (and which was a bit unrealistic to begin with.) According to secretary general of the National Drugs Board, Daniel Radio, “I think there was excessive optimism regarding the possibilities of growth, because we aren’t playing alone here.” He went on to say, “Some investment is showing up in manufacturing and value-added processes. That has to be our bet, because it’s the only way Uruguay can be competitive.”

Medical cannabis tourism

Uruguay isn’t the only country interested in a cannabis tourism market, in fact, it’s becoming all the rage. For years, Amsterdam held the title for the biggest cannabis tourism destination, but there are plenty of others, from Christiana in Copenhagen, Denmark, to Spain with its selection of cannabis clubs. Plenty of countries are also using the medical aspect to open medical cannabis tourism markets.

Last year, Thailand became the first Asian country to legalize medical cannabis, and though the country doesn’t seem to have any immediate intentions to go recreational, it is trying to build a medical cannabis tourism industry. As per Marut Jirasrattasiri, the Department of Thai Traditional and Alternative Medicine Director, “Thailand is already a tourist destination for many foreigners, and marijuana will be another attraction for the country and for medical tourists.” In order to make this happen, draft legislation was created to allow foreigners access to Thai medical cannabis clinics, and possibly allow medical patients to bring their own cannabis with them.

The US Virgin Islands, also has its eye on grabbing the medical cannabis tourism market. Medical cannabis was made legal in the Virgin Islands in 2019, with provisions in the bill which allow for patients coming from locations with legalized cannabis, to access care in the Virgin Islands for a fee. The same bill also made it open to patients unable to access cannabis medicine in their home country, to enter treatment in an in-house cannabis treatment program.

religious legalization, and that legalization extends to using cannabis freely in religious environments. Also a major point of interest for tourists, with the two combining to form a great basis for cannabis tourism in general.

Conclusion

Will Uruguay really embrace a new cannabis tourism market? Considering the country has already shown its willing to break with international and regional code when it comes to many subjects, and as it has already positioned itself as a trailblazer in cannabis legalization, it’s looking pretty promising. And who would expect less from the country that started it all, then to have a new innovative way to grow its industry?

Hi there! Welcome to CBDtesters.co, your #1 online spot for the most thought-provoking and interesting cannabis and psychedelics-related news worldwide. Check the site out regularly to stay on-top of the ever-changing universe of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up to receive our newsletter, so you never miss a story.

Have You Tried The New High-Potency THCP Vape Cartridges?

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/17/uruguay-planning-to-open-cannabis-tourism-market/

Continue Reading

Cannabis

Merkel Is Leaving, Will Germany’s Medical Cannabis Market Expand to Recreational?

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Right now, there is no legal recreational cannabis market in Europe (though there is one recreational legalization). Out of all of Europe, Germany’s medical cannabis market is by far the biggest, and quickly growing. Does this growing acceptance of cannabis mean that a recreational legalization is next? A failed initiative from last year was a setback, but with elections at the end of the month, and Chancellor Merkel standing down, a recreational legalization could come sooner rather than later.

Germany’s medical cannabis market is the biggest in Europe, and it looks like a changing political dynamic could lead to recreational legalization. This is good for consumers everywhere, as more legalized countries mean more and better products. Think about it, until the recent cannabis boom, products like delta-8 THC didn’t exist at all, and now this alternate form to delta-9, which causes less anxiety and couch locking, is available all over the place. Interested parties can check out our large selection of delta-8 THC, thcv, thcp, thco, hhc and delta 10 deals along with plenty of other compounds. The world of cannabis is growing, don’t miss out.

Germany and cannabis law

Germany is a recreationally illegal country when it comes to cannabis. Under the German Federal Narcotics Act, an offender can be sentenced to up to five years in prison for possession. This only covers possession, as there is technically nothing stated legally about use, meaning being caught using is likely to incur civil penalties or some kind of program, so long as the quantity is considered a ‘small amount’.

What’s a small amount? This is actually not specified, and is judged not just by physical weight, but by delta-9 THC content. Different regions of the country have their own limits, ranging anywhere from 6-15 grams. Cultivation and suppling cannabis are predictably illegal, and offenders generally receive up to five years in prison. Supply crimes can vary, with the possibility of garnering anywhere from 1-15 years in prison, depending on circumstances.

Germany approved the use of Dronabinol in 1998, officially allowing a small amount of medical use from that time. A full medical cannabis bill passed in 2017, expanding greatly on the original legalization. At this time, all medical cannabis was imported into the country, mainly from the Netherlands and Canada. This changed in 2019, when Germany legalized the production and exportation of medical cannabis products, thereby entering the global medical cannabis market.

enter the Düsseldorf Stock Exchange is Cannovum AG, which entered this past May, 2021.

How big is Germany’s medical cannabis market?

On March 4th, 2020, a list of questions was posed by left party Die Linke to government officials in parliament. According to BfArM – The Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices which oversees the regulation of the cannabis industry in the country, in regards to number of users, a survey performed by the agency showed 13,343 complete records. In its write-up and translation of the article, leading cannabis market intelligence firm Prohibition Partners estimated there were approximately 128,000 patients a year who received medical cannabis from the government, at that time. The government was not able to give a more specific number.

In terms of cannabis imports to Germany, Q4 of 2020 saw 3,264 kilograms enter the country, which is the highest of any quarter so far. This brought the year’s total to 9,249 kilograms. Germany’s import market grew so quickly that there was over a 100% increase in 2018 and 2019, though only 37% in 2020, possibly due to the corona pandemic. In the past, Germany imported mainly from Canada and the Netherlands.

Germany now accepts imports from Portugal, Israel, Uruguay, Spain, and Australia. It’s expected that countries with lower production costs, like Uruguay and Portugal (and likely the legalized African countries soon), will be major providers in the future. Besides imports, Germany is starting to produce itself, with the expectation of domestic suppliers providing 2,600 kilograms a year, or more. This broadening of countries to buy from has had a big effect on one of Germany’s biggest suppliers, the Netherlands, which saw a decrease in exports of 5% for the year, the first time this has happened.

Prior to 2020, Germany’s medical cannabis market was already very large, with statistics from 2019 showing Germany as both the biggest importer and exporter of cannabis oil for Europe, and being a main contender globally. For imports that year, according to worldstopexports, Germany imported $240 million worth of cannabis oil, second only to the US which imported a massive $893 million worth that year. The next European country to make the list was France, in 5th place, with $152.7 million worth of imports. Germany accounted for 7.8% of all cannabis oil imports that year.

In terms of exports, Germany was still the top European provider, coming in fourth place globally with $229.8 million worth exported. The next European country on the list was Spain, with $190.5 million for the year. Topping the list were China at just under one billion, India at $320.8 million, and the US with 309.7 million. All these numbers apply only to cannabis oil, and do not account for other products like cannabis flowers, other concentrates, tinctures, creams, patches, or capsules.

rejected in parliament, and not because it didn’t have ample support. The rejection was more due to coalitions, than the idea of mass opposition to it. In Germany, there are six main political parties, as well as other smaller ones. Two of those main parties, the Social Democratic party of Germany, and the Union, (which itself is the combination of two parties including the Christian Democrats led by German Chancellor Angela Merkel) have a coalition.

The Social Democratic party holds 152 seats and is in favor of legalization. However, the Union holds 264 seats and is against legalization. The Social Democrats generally vote alongside the Union members, meaning that together they hold enough seats to derail legalization attempts, even though many of those seats are held by politicians looking to legalize, and other political parties also promote legalization. This is what happened to last year’s proposed bill for an adult-use market. It makes for quite the odd pairing considering how opposite the two parties are on many issues, including cannabis.

The thing is, when you see a government that has a large percentage leaning in a certain direction, strategic coalitions will only last so long, especially as public opinion changes. At a certain point, in order to remain in office, these politicians will have to succumb to the will of the people. This is the same thing that can be seen in North Carolina where republicans are now leading the charge for medical legalization with the understanding – stated by them directly, that they don’t have a choice anymore.

Another main party, the Green party, which currently holds 67 seats, has been gaining support and was vying with Merkel’s Union coalition earlier this year for the top spot in opinion polls. This September there are Bundestag Elections, in which the federal parliament is elected. As Angela Merkel will not be running this year as per her announcement in 2018 to stand down as Chancellor and leader of the Christian Democrats, this certainly opens the door for general change.

A lot has changed since 2005 when Merkel first came to power. The German Hemp Association, which has been conducting polls since 2014, saw 30% in favor of legalizing in their poll that year. This number went up to 46% for legalization within just a few years. In terms of decriminalization, 59% backed it in 2018, and no further poll on the matter has been taken since this time.

believes that there are upwards of four million cannabis users in the country, which means if Germany has a big cannabis market with only medical, it could be massive with recreational. We’ll find out how ready Germany is to embrace this idea at the end of the month.

Conclusion

Many countries are getting closer to recreational legalizations, so its not surprising that the country with the largest cannabis industry in Europe, would be looking to expand further. Germany’s medical cannabis market has been booming since 2017, and with a huge change coming in the political scene what with the end of Merkel’s reign, the former opposition to a legalized recreational market, might finally be taken over by a push to legalize.

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DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.

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Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/09/17/merkel-is-leaving-will-germanys-medical-cannabis-market-expand-to-recreational/

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