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Tesla Model 3 New #1 in Hot European Market, & Plugin Vehicles Get 16% Market Share!

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The European plugin passenger vehicle market continues to rise, scoring over 227,000 registrations in March (+169% YoY) and putting last month’s plugin vehicle share of the broader passenger vehicle market at 16% share (7.6% fully electric/BEV). That pulls the 2021 plugin vehicle (PEV) share to 15% (6.6% for BEVs alone).

This time growth came from both sides of the plugin electric vehicle market, with BEVs doubling their sales year on year while PHEVs continued surging at a faster pace, seeing their sales jump by 264% year over year (YoY) last month. So, plugin hybrids remained the major growth source for plugins in the first months of 2021.

With a higher than expected end-of-quarter peak, the Model 3 won its second best seller title in a row, confirming its good form this year.

The same can’t be said about the remaining 2020 podium bearers. Last year’s winner, the Renault Zoe, was only 4th in March, while the VW ID.3, the bronze medalist last year, continued to underperform, reaching a low 6th place last month. With VW’s hatchback faltering, all eyes are now on the new ID.4 crossover, which had its first real delivery month in March. It ended up in 5th, already above its slightly older (and shorter) sibling. A sign of things to come?

Looking at March Top 5 Models

#1 Tesla Model 3 — The US sports sedan returned to form by scoring 24,184 deliveries last month, a larger than expected high tide, allowing it to register 4 times more units than the runner-up Hyundai Kona EV. Regarding March, the Model 3 had several 4-digit scores — in the United Kingdom (6,500 units), France (4,524), Germany (3,699), Norway (2,169), Italy (1,363), and Sweden and Austria (1,192 units each).

#2 Hyundai Kona EV — The Korean crossover is already recovering from the pull-forward stunt of the last months of 2020, something that others can’t say the same about. As a result, the Hyundai EV reached the runner-up position in February, no doubt thanks to its competitive range-vs.-price ratio. The distinctive crossover scored 5,643 deliveries last month. In March, Germany was by far the best market for the Hyundai nameplate, with 3,237 deliveries, followed by the United Kingdom (800 deliveries), France (409), and Norway (349).

#3 Volvo XC40 PHEV — The smallest of Volvo’s PHEV lineup is now the the continent’s favorite PHEV. The Swedish carmaker sees its plugin hybrid XC40, like its other PHEVs, as just another trimline in Europe, which leads to more sales. Further, it sits at the heart of the hot compact SUV category. In March, the Belgian-built Volvo scored 5,567 registrations, earning its 3rd Best Selling PHEV title in a row. The markets where the Volvo plugin was in high rotation were Sweden (1,192 units), the United Kingdom (900 units), and Germany (624 units). Without production constraints and currently experiencing strong demand, the compact Volvo is a strong candidate for the 2021 PHEV Best Seller title.

#4 Renault Zoe — The 5,482 registration number shows that the French hatchback is yet to recover from the 2020 year-end peak effort, having seen its registrations drop by two digits last month, an even more worrying event in the context of doubling sales in the European BEV market. In any case, the main markets in March were the usual, with Germany (1,692 units) leading, followed by France (1,519), while Italy (721) was a distant 3rd.

#5 Volkswagen ID.4 — Sitting in the vortex of the current hottest trends (plugins and compact crossovers/SUVs), much is expected from the new Volkswagen, especially considering that its ID.3 sibling hasn’t really set the market on fire. The ID.4 doesn’t have much margin for failure, so it was good to see it start its first real delivery month in 5th, just 500 units behind the runner-up Hyundai Kona EV. With the ID.3 currently failing to run at the same pace as the Tesla Model 3, it’s up to the ID.4 to save VW’s honor in Europe. Regarding March, the German EV had 5,104 units registered, with the biggest market being its homeland, Germany, with 872 registrations. Norway followed, with 856 units, and the United Kingdom was third, with 500.

Looking at the remaining March table, the highlights were several record performances on the table, like the #7 BMW 3 Series PHEV scoring a record 4,957 units, the #10 Peugeot 3008 PHEV hitting a record 4,243 registrations, and the veteran VW e-Up hitting a record 4,206 registrations, an amazing performance for the small EV, helping the German automaker to compensate for the slower sales of the ID.3.

Still on the subject of record performances, and highlighting the great moment Volvo is having, the XC60 PHEV scored another record score — 4,189 deliveries. That was slightly ahead of another record performer, the Peugeot 208 EV — 4,098 registrations — and #19 BMW X1 (3,876).

A mention also goes out to the Nissan Leaf. Thanks to heavy discounts of its 62 kWh version, it jumped to 8th last month, with 4,708 registrations.

Outside the top 20, a mention goes out to the Toyota RAV4 PHEV, with the Japanese automaker continuing to ramp up deliveries of its RAV4 PHEV model. The RAV4 PHEV reached 2,575 registrations last month, a new record for the Japanese SUV and the same number of units registered as the Peugeot 2008 EV (e-2008) — which is also in a slow production ramp-up. The Mini Cooper EV scored a record 3,324 registrations.

Finally, an interesting fact: if we sum all VW Golf cousins’ PHEV sales together (Seat/Cupra Leon + Skoda Octavia + Audi A3), we get almost 10,000 units, which, added to the VW Golf PHEV’s registrations, would bring that model to some 14,000 registrations. That would make it the second best selling plugin vehicle in Europe, only trailing the Tesla Model 3.

Looking at the 2021 ranking, the main news was the Tesla Model 3 shooting up to #1, with the sports sedan having almost a 20,000 unit lead over the #2 Volvo XC40 PHEV.

The remaining best sellers from last year are underperforming. The Renault Zoe is down 39% YoY, while the all-new VW ID.3 is just 12% above what the then veteran e-Golf had 12 months ago. One can already say that this second quarter will be a stroll around the park for the sports sedan from Silicon Valley, possibly securing enough advantage over the competition to allow it to manage a demand defection to the Tesla Model Y or volume surges in the competition tallies. The Model 3 is certainly now the clear favorite to win the 2021 Best Seller title in Europe.

But the Climber of the Month was the Hyundai Kona EV, which jumped 5 spots to #5. The Korean crossover is now aiming for a podium seat.

The BMW 330e also had a good month, climbing to 6th — but, year to date, the BMW midsizer has about a third of the Tesla Model 3’s sales, which says a lot about the impossible uphill battle that the future BMW i4 will have to face….

In the second half of the table, the small VW e-Up continues to climb in the ranking. It’s now in #13, just one position below another rising model, as the Ford Kuga PHEV (Euro-spec Ford Escape) jumped from #16 to #12 in March.

We had three models returning to the table in March, with the most surprising being the Nissan Leaf, up to #16. The VW Golf PHEV was up to #17 and the Mercedes A250e, last year’s best selling PHEV, jumped to #19.

Unlike the model ranking, where we already have a clear favorite, in the automaker ranking, balance is the word, with the 3 top brands separated by just 700 units. Volkswagen, Mercedes, and BMW each have 10% share. The Wolfsburg brand is currently on top, but the differences are so small that anything can happen.

Below these three we have #4 Volvo, with 8%, followed by Tesla (7%), and tied in 6th we have Peugeot and Renault, both with 6% share (Peugeot currently has a 34 unit advantaged over its arch rival).

BEV D-Segment / Midsize Category

Tesla’s midsize sedan lives in another galaxy, having created a sizable distance over the competition. It has seen its sales increase 47% over the first quarter of 2020, and it won’t have significant competition in the next few months, as the Tesla Model Y will only land in the second half of the year.

The Mercedes EQC (2,131 units last month) recovered the second spot, having surpassed the Polestar 2 in March, with the Sino-Swede now being some 400 units behind the Mercedes SUV (4,194 vs. 3,792).

So far, the only other significant midsize BEV was the Jaguar I-PACE (792 units in March), but the BMW iX3 has finally started to be delivered in volume, reaching 566 units last month. Will we see it surpass the Jaguar in the next couple of months?

BEV E/F-Segment / Full Size Category

The Audi e-tron’s domination is unquestionable, but its seemingly never ending growth seems to have finally stopped, with the Big Audi’s current 7,642 units representing an 8% sales drop year over year. Despite this, the Audi SUV seems destined to win another category title this year. With Tesla basically giving up on the Model S & X for the first half of the year, what they will recover in the second half of the year shouldn’t be enough to compensate for the drought in the first half. The #2 model, the Porsche Taycan (1,778 units last month) is too niche to go head to head with the e-tron in the sales charts.

Regarding the remaining competition, the Mercedes EQV luxury van is still in 3rd place, with 431 units, 41 more than the Audi e-tron GT. The Audi sports sedan’s production ramp-up should allow it to reach the podium soon, though, thus putting a Volkswagen Group model in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/04/28/tesla-model-3-new-1-in-hot-european-market-plugin-vehicles-get-16-market-share/

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Workers At Tesla Giga Texas Get Up Close & Personal With The Tesla Cybertruck

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A new video of the Tesla Cybertruck at Giga Texas has found its way to TikTok and Twitter user Marc Benton, who shared the video on Twitter. In the video, construction workers get up close and personal with the Cybertruck.

It seems that after its adventure in New York City, the Tesla Cybertuck returned to Texas to get down and dirty. Twitter user Mr. Grey shared this photo of the Cybertruck and I think I like it looking a bit messy. The dirt on the front gives it that rugged work truck feel instead of its usual real-life CGI or Cyperpunk 77 vibes.

Mark Larsen pointed out something that those of us here in the buggy South would often worry about — bugs. He mused as to what the front end would look like when bugs are swarming thick at sunset. That image popped into my head as well, since here in Louisiana we are bug central with an added mix of humidity.

Trevor from Tesla Owners Online had a solution and I definitely took notes.

He suggested WD-40 and noted that he used it on his airplane cowling and that it works. He doesn’t use it on his Tesla due to the matte PPF and ceramic on the vehicle. The Cybertruck will have a stainless steel exoskeleton. When I get mine, I will probably just leave it as is even though I do like purple a lot.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/16/workers-at-tesla-giga-texas-get-up-close-personal-with-the-tesla-cybertruck/

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Workers At Tesla Giga Texas Get Up Close & Personal With The Tesla Cybertruck

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Published

on

A new video of the Tesla Cybertruck at Giga Texas has found its way to TikTok and Twitter user Marc Benton, who shared the video on Twitter. In the video, construction workers get up close and personal with the Cybertruck.

It seems that after its adventure in New York City, the Tesla Cybertuck returned to Texas to get down and dirty. Twitter user Mr. Grey shared this photo of the Cybertruck and I think I like it looking a bit messy. The dirt on the front gives it that rugged work truck feel instead of its usual real-life CGI or Cyperpunk 77 vibes.

Mark Larsen pointed out something that those of us here in the buggy South would often worry about — bugs. He mused as to what the front end would look like when bugs are swarming thick at sunset. That image popped into my head as well, since here in Louisiana we are bug central with an added mix of humidity.

Trevor from Tesla Owners Online had a solution and I definitely took notes.

He suggested WD-40 and noted that he used it on his airplane cowling and that it works. He doesn’t use it on his Tesla due to the matte PPF and ceramic on the vehicle. The Cybertruck will have a stainless steel exoskeleton. When I get mine, I will probably just leave it as is even though I do like purple a lot.


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Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/16/workers-at-tesla-giga-texas-get-up-close-personal-with-the-tesla-cybertruck/

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A University’s Tragedy Sparks a Citywide Turnaround

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Originally published on WRI’s Resource Institute Insights Blog.
By Madeleine Galvin and Anne Maassen 

Monterrey, like other major Mexican cities, rapidly expanded outward during the end of the 20th century. New policies favored investment in new suburban neighborhoods, attracting residents and businesses to the periphery, and provoking several decades of insecurity and population decline. City streets emptied, unused public spaces fell into disarray and drug-related criminality tore at the social fabric of local communities.

In 2010, Tecnológico de Monterrey (Tec), Monterrey’s historic and prestigious university, reached a crossroads when two students were killed right outside the university’s gates. This was a turning point for the university and Monterrey. Tec’s response to the tragedy would eventually shape the fate of the city; it laid the groundwork for a new model of dense and mixed-use city planning and design that would draw people back to the city center.

The DistritoTec regeneration initiative has helped bring people back to the neighborhoods surrounding Monterrey, Mexico’s historic and prestigious university. Photo by DistritoTec

Deciding to Stay

Prompted by the tragedy on its doorstep, Tec faced a difficult decision: it could abandon its increasingly unsafe historical location and start fresh elsewhere, or it could stay and take part in rebuilding trust in the local area.

The university stayed. This decision was not a foregone conclusion — many others have taken flight when faced with violence. But as Tec president David Garza told WRI, this decision came with “a commitment of transformation — not of the campus, but rather of the surrounding areas.”

In 2014, Tec launched the vision for DistritoTec, a district-scale regeneration initiative and a finalist for the 2020-2021 Prize for Cities, alongside an area masterplan. With DistritoTec, Tec formulated a new role for itself in local urban development. Today, the university plays a key role in reweaving the lost connection with its 24 surrounding neighborhoods by working with local residents, business owners and the city government.

Bringing Communities Together

Delivering the vision for DistritoTec involved an inclusive process of co-creating solutions with the local community to transform the surrounding areas.

The team behind DistritoTec immediately got to work. They adopted a measured and deliberate approach to build trust in the community, engaged in multiple conversations around the current state of the city and its future, and encouraged neighbors to meet each other and interact regularly. Local residents, business owners and the DistritoTec team then converged around a central set of goals for the district. These included employment opportunities, affordable housing, high-quality public spaces and sustainable mobility options.

To ensure continued input and support from local residents, the team encouraged the formation of neighborhood committees that were represented in a new, larger governance body for the district, the Neighborhood Council of DistritoTec. In 2015, the Council gained formal recognition by the municipality of Monterrey. While establishing a grassroots model for governance in the district took many months — some residents were initially afraid to even open their doors or share their names due to the area’s security challenges — this time was essential in co-creating a shared vision for the area and establishing clear roles and responsibilities.

These neighborhood committees bring community members together, help them identify the specific needs of the area, and transform abandoned or underutilized public spaces into vibrant community hubs. The committees have also participated in reforestation programs and organized events across the district, including cinema nights, concerts, local markets and art shows, which attract tens of thousands of people. But above all, by shifting the perception that urban development can only be led and enacted by the government, the committees have given district residents the control to create the neighborhoods and city that they want.

Community members participate in DistritoTec’s reforestation program. Neighborhood committees give district residents the ability to create the neighborhoods and city that they want. Photo by DistritoTec

Since DistritoTec’s launch, Monterrey has become markedly safer. Within the district, there has not been a robbery in two years. But as Alejandra Naranjo, a local resident puts it, “The most significant change is the interaction between the communities: the neighbors, the students and the project team. The students approach us. They have improved the public spaces. It is charming to live here.”

People at the Heart of Infrastructure

Between 1980 and 2010, Monterrey experienced rapid and sprawling urbanization, such that the city’s population doubled, but its density decreased by 75%. In the district neighborhoods, 36% of homes were uninhabited by the end of 2010. As the distance between their homes, jobs and services grew, residents increasingly relied on private vehicles that contribute heavily to greenhouse gas emissions.

To address sprawl, Tec co-created a proposal with the neighborhood committees, urban planning experts and municipal authorities to create mixed-use development and increase the density of the district through efforts like new affordable housing. This kind of special development zone was new for district-scale development in Mexico, as it had previously only been applied at the much smaller scale of individual neighborhoods.

Lorena Pulido Ramírez, manager of the Distrito Tec team in Monterrey. “Infrastructure has this ability to shape us, but we also can shape the infrastructure and our spaces. We are reclaiming the streets for people.” Photo by WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities

Municipal support helped finance the key physical improvements that made the district’s streets safer and more conducive to people — particularly to active, low-carbon mobility. The Garza Sada roundabout, a major hotspot for road traffic injuries, was transformed to include crosswalks, wider sidewalks and pedestrian lights. In addition, more than three kilometers of “complete streets” — design changes that improve pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, such as protected bike lanes, were implemented across the district.

“Infrastructure has this ability to shape us, but we also can shape the infrastructure and our spaces,” said Lorena Pulido Ramírez, manager of the DistritoTec team. “We are reclaiming the streets for people.”

As a result, the district became a dense, compact place with significantly less dependence on cars and a much lower environmental impact. Census data from 2020 revealed that the district’s population increased 56% and the number of uninhabited homes decreased by 27% since 2010. DistritoTec reshaped the district’s physical environment to meet the needs of its residents, prompting people to stay in Monterrey — and incentivizing others to return.

A Commitment to Connected Cities

Today, the district is breathing again.

Once a month, people of all walks of life mingle together in Calle Junco de la Vega, Monterrey’s first complete street, to enjoy live music, eat together, and play and dance in the open air. The street comes to life with the sounds and smells of Callejero — an open streets event during which pop-up tables, food trucks, performance stages and play spaces provide a meeting space for people who live, work, walk and study here.

Monterrey residents enjoying the open streets of Callejero, a monthly open streets event. Today, the city is a connected, compact and thriving urban center. Photo by DistritoTec

For Mexican cities challenged with sprawl and other problems similar to Monterrey, DistritoTec symbolizes the transformative potential of socially committed institutions in creating compact, connected and thriving urban centers.

The model has already begun to scale: changes to the city’s public participation laws and financial mechanisms have laid the groundwork for other districts to flourish, providing stakeholders with a direct voice into city affairs and a viable financial model for funding programs and physical upgrades. Three additional districts in Monterrey are now replicating DistritoTec’s model.

Scaling has also taken place through the students. Since the creation of DistritoTec, the university has modified its learning model to allow a more hands on approach to education. Students have taken active part in restoration activities, ecological studies and park rehabilitation, and they are encouraged to develop innovative ideas for the district. By allowing students to connect with their surrounding communities, Tec is ensuring that its commitment to social transformation lives on.

The 2020-2021 Prize for Cities celebrates innovative approaches to tackling climate change and urban inequality together, showing how to live and thrive in a changing world. From five finalists, one grand prize winner will be announced June 2021.


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.

 



 

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Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/16/a-universitys-tragedy-sparks-a-citywide-turnaround/

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A University’s Tragedy Sparks a Citywide Turnaround

Avatar

Published

on

Originally published on WRI’s Resource Institute Insights Blog.
By Madeleine Galvin and Anne Maassen 

Monterrey, like other major Mexican cities, rapidly expanded outward during the end of the 20th century. New policies favored investment in new suburban neighborhoods, attracting residents and businesses to the periphery, and provoking several decades of insecurity and population decline. City streets emptied, unused public spaces fell into disarray and drug-related criminality tore at the social fabric of local communities.

In 2010, Tecnológico de Monterrey (Tec), Monterrey’s historic and prestigious university, reached a crossroads when two students were killed right outside the university’s gates. This was a turning point for the university and Monterrey. Tec’s response to the tragedy would eventually shape the fate of the city; it laid the groundwork for a new model of dense and mixed-use city planning and design that would draw people back to the city center.

The DistritoTec regeneration initiative has helped bring people back to the neighborhoods surrounding Monterrey, Mexico’s historic and prestigious university. Photo by DistritoTec

Deciding to Stay

Prompted by the tragedy on its doorstep, Tec faced a difficult decision: it could abandon its increasingly unsafe historical location and start fresh elsewhere, or it could stay and take part in rebuilding trust in the local area.

The university stayed. This decision was not a foregone conclusion — many others have taken flight when faced with violence. But as Tec president David Garza told WRI, this decision came with “a commitment of transformation — not of the campus, but rather of the surrounding areas.”

In 2014, Tec launched the vision for DistritoTec, a district-scale regeneration initiative and a finalist for the 2020-2021 Prize for Cities, alongside an area masterplan. With DistritoTec, Tec formulated a new role for itself in local urban development. Today, the university plays a key role in reweaving the lost connection with its 24 surrounding neighborhoods by working with local residents, business owners and the city government.

Bringing Communities Together

Delivering the vision for DistritoTec involved an inclusive process of co-creating solutions with the local community to transform the surrounding areas.

The team behind DistritoTec immediately got to work. They adopted a measured and deliberate approach to build trust in the community, engaged in multiple conversations around the current state of the city and its future, and encouraged neighbors to meet each other and interact regularly. Local residents, business owners and the DistritoTec team then converged around a central set of goals for the district. These included employment opportunities, affordable housing, high-quality public spaces and sustainable mobility options.

To ensure continued input and support from local residents, the team encouraged the formation of neighborhood committees that were represented in a new, larger governance body for the district, the Neighborhood Council of DistritoTec. In 2015, the Council gained formal recognition by the municipality of Monterrey. While establishing a grassroots model for governance in the district took many months — some residents were initially afraid to even open their doors or share their names due to the area’s security challenges — this time was essential in co-creating a shared vision for the area and establishing clear roles and responsibilities.

These neighborhood committees bring community members together, help them identify the specific needs of the area, and transform abandoned or underutilized public spaces into vibrant community hubs. The committees have also participated in reforestation programs and organized events across the district, including cinema nights, concerts, local markets and art shows, which attract tens of thousands of people. But above all, by shifting the perception that urban development can only be led and enacted by the government, the committees have given district residents the control to create the neighborhoods and city that they want.

Community members participate in DistritoTec’s reforestation program. Neighborhood committees give district residents the ability to create the neighborhoods and city that they want. Photo by DistritoTec

Since DistritoTec’s launch, Monterrey has become markedly safer. Within the district, there has not been a robbery in two years. But as Alejandra Naranjo, a local resident puts it, “The most significant change is the interaction between the communities: the neighbors, the students and the project team. The students approach us. They have improved the public spaces. It is charming to live here.”

People at the Heart of Infrastructure

Between 1980 and 2010, Monterrey experienced rapid and sprawling urbanization, such that the city’s population doubled, but its density decreased by 75%. In the district neighborhoods, 36% of homes were uninhabited by the end of 2010. As the distance between their homes, jobs and services grew, residents increasingly relied on private vehicles that contribute heavily to greenhouse gas emissions.

To address sprawl, Tec co-created a proposal with the neighborhood committees, urban planning experts and municipal authorities to create mixed-use development and increase the density of the district through efforts like new affordable housing. This kind of special development zone was new for district-scale development in Mexico, as it had previously only been applied at the much smaller scale of individual neighborhoods.

Lorena Pulido Ramírez, manager of the Distrito Tec team in Monterrey. “Infrastructure has this ability to shape us, but we also can shape the infrastructure and our spaces. We are reclaiming the streets for people.” Photo by WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities

Municipal support helped finance the key physical improvements that made the district’s streets safer and more conducive to people — particularly to active, low-carbon mobility. The Garza Sada roundabout, a major hotspot for road traffic injuries, was transformed to include crosswalks, wider sidewalks and pedestrian lights. In addition, more than three kilometers of “complete streets” — design changes that improve pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, such as protected bike lanes, were implemented across the district.

“Infrastructure has this ability to shape us, but we also can shape the infrastructure and our spaces,” said Lorena Pulido Ramírez, manager of the DistritoTec team. “We are reclaiming the streets for people.”

As a result, the district became a dense, compact place with significantly less dependence on cars and a much lower environmental impact. Census data from 2020 revealed that the district’s population increased 56% and the number of uninhabited homes decreased by 27% since 2010. DistritoTec reshaped the district’s physical environment to meet the needs of its residents, prompting people to stay in Monterrey — and incentivizing others to return.

A Commitment to Connected Cities

Today, the district is breathing again.

Once a month, people of all walks of life mingle together in Calle Junco de la Vega, Monterrey’s first complete street, to enjoy live music, eat together, and play and dance in the open air. The street comes to life with the sounds and smells of Callejero — an open streets event during which pop-up tables, food trucks, performance stages and play spaces provide a meeting space for people who live, work, walk and study here.

Monterrey residents enjoying the open streets of Callejero, a monthly open streets event. Today, the city is a connected, compact and thriving urban center. Photo by DistritoTec

For Mexican cities challenged with sprawl and other problems similar to Monterrey, DistritoTec symbolizes the transformative potential of socially committed institutions in creating compact, connected and thriving urban centers.

The model has already begun to scale: changes to the city’s public participation laws and financial mechanisms have laid the groundwork for other districts to flourish, providing stakeholders with a direct voice into city affairs and a viable financial model for funding programs and physical upgrades. Three additional districts in Monterrey are now replicating DistritoTec’s model.

Scaling has also taken place through the students. Since the creation of DistritoTec, the university has modified its learning model to allow a more hands on approach to education. Students have taken active part in restoration activities, ecological studies and park rehabilitation, and they are encouraged to develop innovative ideas for the district. By allowing students to connect with their surrounding communities, Tec is ensuring that its commitment to social transformation lives on.

The 2020-2021 Prize for Cities celebrates innovative approaches to tackling climate change and urban inequality together, showing how to live and thrive in a changing world. From five finalists, one grand prize winner will be announced June 2021.


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.

 



 

Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/16/a-universitys-tragedy-sparks-a-citywide-turnaround/

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