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What We Know About Tesla’s “Bobcat Project”

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The Austin Business Journal has shared the news of Tesla’s latest project in Austin. It is nicknamed the “Bobcat Project,” but there are not a lot of details out yet. The article (which is paywalled) noted that there is a new site plan with an additional facility nearby.

KXAN added a bit more detail in its report, noting that Tesla’s “Bobcat Project” pointed to another industrial building rising off Harold Green road near Giga Texas. The video below also shares some clues.

Tesmanian reports that construction work on the new facility has already begun and shared drone footage provided by Terafactory Texas on YouTube (video above) of the construction site. The footage shows that the land preparation is already happening — east of the factory building. For now, part of the site has a cover prepared for the start of construction while another part still has a pond. Tesmanian pointed out that it’s worth considering that this section was prepared for the construction of a road and not a building and plans to monitor the progress of the construction.

The original story from the Austin Business Journal stated that Tesla’s Colorado River Project LLC already purchased more than 2,500 acres outside of Austin. Andy Linseisen, assistant director of Austin’s Development Services Department, told ABJ that Tesla has been conducting restoration work since last year. This was to limit its mining operations on the land.

We don’t know much right now, but hopefully soon more details will come to light as to what Tesla has planned for “Project Bobcat.”


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/07/what-we-know-about-teslas-bobcat-project/

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Tesla Cybertruck On Display In Manhattan

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The Manhattan Tesla store has a special vehicle in its showroom this weekend — the Tesla Cybertruck. Elon Musk confirmed that Tesla’s hottest new EV will be there until Sunday. The showroom is located in the Meatpacking District of Manhattan, NY. The Cybertruck’s appearance is in connection to Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s appearance on Saturday Night Live on Saturday.

When Owen Sparks asked Elon how long the Cybertruck would be in New York, Elon replied that it would be there until Sunday. I actually have a Cybertruck on preorder and am excited about more sightings. Recently, Elon showcased the Cybertruck at Giga Texas.

Images of the vehicle’s visit to Giga Texas were shared by members of the Tesla community on Reddit — the r/TeslaMotors subreddit. Photos and videos showed that workers at Giga Texas were in awe of the beast. I think that’s what I’ll name mine, “The Beast.”

More Tweets & Photos of the Cybertruck in New York

Featured photo by Tesla Owners Club Of New York, used with permission.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/07/tesla-cybertruck-on-display-in-manhattan/

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Tesla Director Of Energy On Transition To Renewables: “It’s Happening Quickly”

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Mark Twidell, Director of Energy at Tesla, was recently in Adelaide, Australia, where he spoke at a Southstart entrepreneur’s conference, reported Financial Review. Originally, Tesla’s chairwoman, Robyn Denholm, was scheduled to speak at this event, but she was ill, so Twidell stepped in. Here’s to wishing Tesla’s chair a speedy recovery.

Twidell spoke about the electric vehicle industry’s demand for lithium as well as the demand from the energy industry. He noted that the use of large storage batteries was sharply increasing.

“Australia has the raw materials in abundance like no other nation on Earth,” said Twidell. He also said around 40 large storage batteries on an industrial scale were in the planning stage around Australia, which had a big opportunity in front of it exporting “climate solutions.”

“Let’s actually increase the benefits to Australia,” he said, adding that the lithium-ion battery value chain is forecast to be $400 billion by 2030. He also pointed out that the economics of renewable energy is currently driving its take-up on top of the environmental benefits. “It’s the economics at the end of the day which transitions us to where we are going,” he said.“The environmental benefits make sense, but economics will see us through.”

The article gives a short background on Twidell. He headed the team that set up Tesla’s big battery at Hornsdale near Jamestown. This battery in mid-north South Australia was built in fewer than 100 days back in 2017, and at the time, it was the world’s largest battery storage project. It was constructed in a partnership between Tesla and the French group Neoen.

Twidell also emphasized just how fast the renewables transition is happening. He noted that the transition to renewables is speeding up and that it’s pointless to try to argue otherwise. “It’s a huge economic opportunity. It’s silly to fight to say the transition isn’t happening. It’s happening quickly,” he said.

How Quickly Is This Transition Happening?

I’m going to dive into a couple of examples that reflect on this last point.

Coal is being replaced with renewables in the U.S. 

Energy News Network reported just a few hours ago that solar and wind’s competitiveness over coal is accelerating. Around four-fifths of U.S. coal plants are either scheduled to close by 2025 or cost more to operate than solar and wind power would. This is backed up by a new research analysis from Energy Innovation: Policy & Technology.

One of the key trends mentioned is that out of the 235 plants in the U.S. coal fleet, 183 are “uneconomic or already retiring.” That is 80% of the plants in service in 2018. To paraphrase, the total share of all the U.S. coal plant capacity from 2018 will no longer be competitive beyond the next few years. Coal is dying and being replaced by renewables.

The reason coal plants are becoming noncompetitive is due to the levelized cost for new solar or wind falling quicker than planned. In 2020, the capacity factor for existing coal plants fell to 40%. That is down from 2017’s percentage of 53%. This means plants are being used less often. And less use means less profit — or no profit. You can read more about that here.

Renewables are a threat to LNG projects in the Philippines

The Manila Standard reported that the growth of renewable energy in the Philippines could leave liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects worth $14 billion stranded. That’s a lot of money left to be stranded. Sam Reynolds, an energy finance analyst for the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) was interviewed in the article.

“As renewables prices continue to drop and global LNG markets tighten to increase fuel costs, LNG-related investments will become increasingly uncompetitive in the Philippines market, especially as smaller electricity consumers become eligible to choose their retail suppliers.”

Reynolds also noted in his report that the rapidly declining cost for renewables demonstrated that long-term pricing shifted in favor of renewable energy growth. “As policies in the Philippines accelerate the transition to clean energy, natural gas-fired power plants reliant on volatile imported fuel prices will realize fewer opportunities for long-term guaranteed returns,” he said.

He also pointed out that there’s a rapid buildout of LNG import infrastructure and this is due to the anticipated depletion of the Malampaya deepwater development–the nation’s only domestic source of natural gas. High gross domestic product growth is expected over the next decade. Exporting countries and industry players pushed the narrative that natural gas represents a viable transition fuel from coal to renewables, he pointed out. He estimated that the total value of the proposed LNG import infrastructure — which includes power plants, ports, regasification facilities, and pipelines — is around $13.6 billion. All of these are at risk of being stranded due to the rapidly changing legal and commercial landscape.

The Transition Is Happening Fast

Renewable energy has been the fastest-growing energy source in the United States — increasing 100% from 2000 to 2018, according to the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions.

Solar generation, including distributed solar, is projected to climb from 11% of total U.S. renewable generation in 2017 to 48% by 2050. This will make solar energy the fastest-growing electricity source.

The report from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions noted that renewables made up 26.2% of global electricity generation in 2018. This is projected to rise to 45% by 2040 and that increase is most likely to come from solar, wind, and hydropower. You can read more of that here.

In the US, renewables grew from 17.5% in 2018 to 18.3% in 2019 to 20.6% in 2020. The trend from 2010–2020 is even more noticeable.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/07/tesla-director-of-energy-on-transition-to-renewables-its-happening-quickly/

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How FERC Transmission Reform Can End the Delay of a Cleaner Future

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Courtesy of Union Of Concerned Scientists.
By Michael Jacobs, Senior energy analyst

Transmission is to electricity what roads and highways are to cars and trucks.

Some local roads (or driveways) are built by private interests to access new real estate development, while most every major highway, bridge or mountain tunnel is built by a regional public agency. The way we plan and pay for our electric transmission follows this logic, until you look at how assumptions about future traffic are dramatically different for the new users, imposing crushing cost burdens on new renewable energy development. The transmission assumptions used for new supplies need to be re-examined so we have a realistic basis for the requirements placed on new supplies that will be competing with existing energy supplies.

Monopolies built this system

The electric utility industry was organized and dominated by monopolies for most of the past 100 years. With state regulators’ consent and approval, these monopolies built for their own needs and interests with little regard for connections to neighboring states or utilities. The logic of a monopoly does not support improving the access to new, competing supplies that a neighboring region might develop and export. All that is starting to change.

I’m going to assume you are familiar with a stack of past writings from UCS (on Order 1000uncompetitive coalcheaper renewablesenergy storage) and others of course, about utilities and competition so I can shed light on transmission expansion, an issue soon to be gripping the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. You might take this on its surface as a debate over who benefits and who pays. But there are structural biases that need to be understood before we can use those supposedly simple rules about costs and benefits.

The highway system has its history and flaws. Planners had neither crystal balls nor an intention to minimize impacts to some communities while creating new opportunities to others.

Today, in the effort to provide reasonable rates for electricity, we can do better. Our approach for transmission planners looking at transmission expansion uses straight-out separate rules applied to transmission that increases competition as compared with transmission that supports the reliability status quo and the (presumed) modestly growing demand for electricity.

One problem with this distinction, as we will see next in the example from Mississippi, is that the real world conditions don’t fit so nicely into these separate buckets. Another is the rules applied to new energy generation assume things that just aren’t realistic.

The muddy waters of the Mississippi Hub

First, the problem of defining reliability as separate from economics. Like a highway jam, when transmission can’t handle the flow, there are problems. During February’s Storm Uri, freezing weather to the South Central U.S. transmission limits became a critical problem. Just east of the ERCOT grid in Texas, the Midcontinent ISO (MISO) system showed supply shortages and price imbalances due to transmission constraints.

In the images below from noon and the evening of February 16, these show up first as an economic problem. As the problem persisted, imports were limited and this became a reliability problem, MISO control room ordered rolling blackouts. The stress on the ties between MISO areas with supplies to share and others can be seen in the price differences preceding the order to cut off customers. Mississippi ties were too small to help Louisiana and East Texas. Energy prices normally in the $20-$50 range spanned from negative $35 to over $1000 across the under-sized east-west path and were 10 times higher in MISO South than in the rest of MISO. See two snapshots from Feb 16, 2021.

Planning for more supply?

The unfortunate illustration from this winter is just an example. Generally, grid investment works to prevent such a situation with two responses: build more generation or build more transmission. (There are more options that are not in FERC or regional transmission organization aka “RTO” authority.) How these two choices are evaluated by the FERC-approved transmission planning practices makes a difference.

Transmission planning for reliability uses narrowly-defined inputs (load growth and predicted violations of reliability) without consideration of future changes in the energy supply. The “regional transmission expansion plan” is a centralized effort by a designated Transmission Planner, usually the RTO or the largest transmission owner in the area. Broadly, folks would agree these planning efforts are conservative. (See Ari Peskoe’s new paper for a fuller opinion.)

Modest load growth projections and weather assumptions based on past records shape the transmission plans. With little new transmission expansion, adding more supply from new generation is very difficult.

The dense center of this debate

There is a specific and separate modeling process for adding new generation. At the center of this different process is a unique view of the future. New generation is addressed through the FERC-defined Large Generator Interconnection Process (LGIP). This process presumes that when there are generators queued up, trying to get added to the energy mix, the second one in line must be studied as if the first new power plant in the queue will be built. So if the one ahead in line takes up some room on the grid, there is less room available for any that come after it. While that may not sound controversial, consider where we are today.

This conceptual frame was established less than 20 years ago to enable competing new supply proponents to understand their rights. Now, in the renewables-rich Midwest states, the MISO has seen over 600 requests to connect wind, solar and battery generation between 2016 and 2020.

In the MISO South region the active solar requests in MISO queue total 1,330 MW in Mississippi; 5,690 MW in Louisiana; 2,660 MW in Arkansas. These, plus the small portion of Texas in MISO, means there is 10,000 MW of solar in the MISO queue in this study area.

Proposed new renewable energy power plants, counted in the billions of dollars and tens of thousands of megawatts, are included in the study of each new proposal. All other regions are also suffering a clogged queue. This congested queue process is not reflected in the regional transmission expansion plan, because that process includes none of these proposed new plants.

Extreme scenario?

The LGIP transmission planning for the proposed new generation, which might compete against the existing generation, presumes 10,000 or 20,000 or 30,000 megawatts of new renewables have been added to the system in the next couple of years. The rest of the electric power system has not been built — in fact is not even modeled — to absorb that added amount. These renewable generators in the queue are faced with an extreme scenario and their studies come back with proportionately extreme results. In the LGIP process that is the admissions process for new competitors, the transmission planning process requires unaffordable costs for distant improvements to the transmission system.

This discussion could continue into the over simplification of “beneficiary pays” and the rights that are not actually secured, but let’s start by building a common understanding. When the transmission planners sit down and describe the future, we should not have two sets of assumptions as divergent as described here, used for planning the same system. Neither the assumption that no change is coming to the generation fleet, nor that every proposed plant will be built, is expected to be true. If a more reasonable, shared set of assumptions can be found, it may be that the work ahead on transmission planning for both reliability and generator interconnection can be improved.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/07/how-ferc-transmission-reform-can-end-the-delay-of-a-cleaner-future/

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