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Survey says that having a family and watching them grow leads to a truly happy life

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As we age, we reminisce on our lives, looking back at what truly made us happy, and what, if anything, would we change. Country Cousins, leading providers of live-in care to those living with Dementia, wanted to know more about what makes people happy, what they credit to an enriched life and what age was their favourite. So, they asked 1,000 UK adults aged between 50-75, and the results are not what we expected.

Men prefer their twenties, yet women preferred their thirties

The survey found that 27% of men preferred their twenties and only 22% of men favoured their thirties.

On the other hand, women seemed to much prefer their thirties as 25% said they were the best years of their life, typically a time when they’re settled and have a young family, and only 21% of women favoured their twenties.

Are the teenage years really the worst in our lives?

92% of respondents say being a teenager, a time when you’re carefree and have no major obligations, were some of the least enjoyable years of their lives?

Perhaps it’s because 32% of people of the 1,000 respondents said watching their family grow around them helped them to live an enriched life, and 17% said having a family leads to a truly happy life.

Along with that, 36% of those over the age of 60 credit watching their family grow and mature around them to be the most rewarding thing about getting older.

What can we take from this?

So, it seems that to live a truly happy, enriched life, we should aspire to have a family and enjoy watching them grow, learn, and maybe one day have a family of their own.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: http://hrnews.co.uk/survey-says-that-having-a-family-and-watching-them-grow-leads-to-a-truly-happy-life/

HRTech

Who is a ‘minimum guy’? Why does an organisation need him?

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The Family Man 2 is streaming on Amazon Prime now. A scene from the series is getting a lot of attention. Srikant Tiwari, an undercover agent, played by Manoj Bajpayee, is toiling hard at his desk-job while his manager breathes down his neck. The manager keeps pushing him to not be a ‘minimum guy’ by doing just the bare minimum. He can be seen berating Tiwari for not doing enough — from coming to office on time to his work in general. The scene got many talking on social media about the very relatable scenario, and soon the ‘minimum guy’ became the hot topic for discussion.

In the real world, there is no dearth of such managers or such ‘Tiwaris’. However, the episode did raise queries regarding the definition of a minimum guy. What qualifies an employee as a minimum guy or a maximum guy for that matter? In terms of evaluation, a minimum guy ‘meets expectations’ and is content with it. The ‘maximum guy’, on the other hand, ‘exceeds expectations’ or is ‘outstanding’. A broad definition, however, is necessary to understand both further. At times, a ‘minimum guy’ may have a negative connotation —of someone who slacks off at work —which isn’t true.

“There are only about five to seven per cent top performers who go out of their way to excel in their current role and even go beyond it. The minimum guys are those who do what they are asked to do. They form the largest population in many organisations. If one takes the normal distribution of a bulker, 50-60 per cent of an organisation will fall into that.”

Ranjith Menon, SVP-HR, Hinduja Global Solutions

In fact both the minimum guy and maximum guy are equally important for an organisation, but HR practitioners highlight a few things that minimum guys have the capability to askew.

Ranjith Menon, SVP-HR, Hinduja Global Solutions explains that the whole concept of bulkers is based on this — bulkers are valued contributors in any organisation who do what they are supposed to do. Many of them fall under the minimum guy criteria.

“There are only about five to seven per cent top performers who go out of their way to excel in their current role and even go beyond it. The minimum guys are those who do what they are asked to do. They form the largest population in many organisations. If one takes the normal distribution of a bulker, 50-60 per cent of an organisation will fall into that,” he points out. Menon wouldn’t call them ‘minimum’ though.

In the context of the scene from The Family Man 2, he says that it shows the classic immaturity of managerial behaviour. What the scene shows is that the manager is not making any attempt to understand what the employee is saying. It’s not about a manager pushing an employee to go beyond. One can turn around anybody’s performance but one needs to understand the semantics the person is operating from.

“Minimum guys beyond a point are a cost drag for a company. The minimum guys do not accept that they are minimum. Everyone is a legend in their minds. That is how conflicts emerge in performance reviews. The minimum guys compare themselves with the maximum guys and feel frustrated. They end up vitiating the climate, thus pushing the morale down.”

Adil Malia, HR leader & CEO, The Firm

He believes the con in this entire dynamics is the proportion of these people. Too much of either would lead to a dysfunctional team. Too many maximum guys will increase competitiveness to another level because nobody would want to be second. While having a healthy mix of both is advisable, the ideal percentage is debatable.

Citing the controversial GE vitality curve as an example, Menon reveals that it distributed the workforce into the 20-70-10 system in the 1980s, pioneered by Jack Welch, chairman and CEO. This means, the top 20 per cent are the brilliant performers while 70 per cent of the bulk are doing what they are supposed to do. The rest of the 10 per cent are to be exempted. However, Menon believes the bottom 10 per cent need not be terminated. They can be coached, reformed or deployed by understanding where they are lacking.

“I believe both the ‘maximum’ and ‘minimum’ guys exist in everyone. We just need to have the ability to understand this and work towards bringing out the maximum guy for the right reasons, which will bring value to the individual as well as the organisation.”

Ravi Kumar, head – people & culture, SHE, Roche Diabetes Care India

Adil Malia, HR leader & CEO, The Firm, has interesting monikers for each of them. While the minimum is the narrowly defined JD guy, the maximum guy is the stretch guy, the ‘extra-miler’. He points out that one is better off being the maximum guy during the unpredictable times in vulnerable employment life-cycles, or in situations where multiple task expectations are demanded, or in a context where labour costs are becoming prohibitive. He wouldn’t prefer minimum guys although he is certain they can be given counselling, coaching and learning inputs to do better.

Malia reasons, “Minimum guys beyond a point are a cost drag for a company. The minimum guys do not accept that they are minimum. Everyone is a legend in their minds. That is how conflicts emerge in performance reviews. The minimum guys compare themselves with the maximum guys and feel frustrated. They end up vitiating the climate, thus pushing the morale down.”

Ravi Kumar, head – people & culture, SHE, Roche Diabetes Care India, is of the opinion that every individual has something in their heart that brings out the maximum guy avatar. On the other hand, one can also be a minimum guy when just doing the bare minimum suffices for certain situations. “I believe both the ‘maximum’ and ‘minimum’ guys exist in everyone. We just need to have the ability to understand this and work towards bringing out the maximum guy for the right reasons, which will bring value to the individual as well as the organisation.”

Kumar further enumerates, “The trick is to get the max guy out so as to harness his full potential. A good manager will be able to do that. It’s all about connecting the persons’ strength to the organisation’s goal.”

Clearly, minimum guys, along with the top-performers, are essential for a balanced workforce, but too much of anything can give rise to challenges.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.hrkatha.com/features/who-is-a-minimum-guy-why-does-an-organisation-need-him/

Continue Reading

HRTech

Who is a ‘minimum guy’? Why does an organisation need him?

Published

on

The Family Man 2 is streaming on Amazon Prime now. A scene from the series is getting a lot of attention. Srikant Tiwari, an undercover agent, played by Manoj Bajpayee, is toiling hard at his desk-job while his manager breathes down his neck. The manager keeps pushing him to not be a ‘minimum guy’ by doing just the bare minimum. He can be seen berating Tiwari for not doing enough — from coming to office on time to his work in general. The scene got many talking on social media about the very relatable scenario, and soon the ‘minimum guy’ became the hot topic for discussion.

In the real world, there is no dearth of such managers or such ‘Tiwaris’. However, the episode did raise queries regarding the definition of a minimum guy. What qualifies an employee as a minimum guy or a maximum guy for that matter? In terms of evaluation, a minimum guy ‘meets expectations’ and is content with it. The ‘maximum guy’, on the other hand, ‘exceeds expectations’ or is ‘outstanding’. A broad definition, however, is necessary to understand both further. At times, a ‘minimum guy’ may have a negative connotation —of someone who slacks off at work —which isn’t true.

“There are only about five to seven per cent top performers who go out of their way to excel in their current role and even go beyond it. The minimum guys are those who do what they are asked to do. They form the largest population in many organisations. If one takes the normal distribution of a bulker, 50-60 per cent of an organisation will fall into that.”

Ranjith Menon, SVP-HR, Hinduja Global Solutions

In fact both the minimum guy and maximum guy are equally important for an organisation, but HR practitioners highlight a few things that minimum guys have the capability to askew.

Ranjith Menon, SVP-HR, Hinduja Global Solutions explains that the whole concept of bulkers is based on this — bulkers are valued contributors in any organisation who do what they are supposed to do. Many of them fall under the minimum guy criteria.

“There are only about five to seven per cent top performers who go out of their way to excel in their current role and even go beyond it. The minimum guys are those who do what they are asked to do. They form the largest population in many organisations. If one takes the normal distribution of a bulker, 50-60 per cent of an organisation will fall into that,” he points out. Menon wouldn’t call them ‘minimum’ though.

In the context of the scene from The Family Man 2, he says that it shows the classic immaturity of managerial behaviour. What the scene shows is that the manager is not making any attempt to understand what the employee is saying. It’s not about a manager pushing an employee to go beyond. One can turn around anybody’s performance but one needs to understand the semantics the person is operating from.

“Minimum guys beyond a point are a cost drag for a company. The minimum guys do not accept that they are minimum. Everyone is a legend in their minds. That is how conflicts emerge in performance reviews. The minimum guys compare themselves with the maximum guys and feel frustrated. They end up vitiating the climate, thus pushing the morale down.”

Adil Malia, HR leader & CEO, The Firm

He believes the con in this entire dynamics is the proportion of these people. Too much of either would lead to a dysfunctional team. Too many maximum guys will increase competitiveness to another level because nobody would want to be second. While having a healthy mix of both is advisable, the ideal percentage is debatable.

Citing the controversial GE vitality curve as an example, Menon reveals that it distributed the workforce into the 20-70-10 system in the 1980s, pioneered by Jack Welch, chairman and CEO. This means, the top 20 per cent are the brilliant performers while 70 per cent of the bulk are doing what they are supposed to do. The rest of the 10 per cent are to be exempted. However, Menon believes the bottom 10 per cent need not be terminated. They can be coached, reformed or deployed by understanding where they are lacking.

“I believe both the ‘maximum’ and ‘minimum’ guys exist in everyone. We just need to have the ability to understand this and work towards bringing out the maximum guy for the right reasons, which will bring value to the individual as well as the organisation.”

Ravi Kumar, head – people & culture, SHE, Roche Diabetes Care India

Adil Malia, HR leader & CEO, The Firm, has interesting monikers for each of them. While the minimum is the narrowly defined JD guy, the maximum guy is the stretch guy, the ‘extra-miler’. He points out that one is better off being the maximum guy during the unpredictable times in vulnerable employment life-cycles, or in situations where multiple task expectations are demanded, or in a context where labour costs are becoming prohibitive. He wouldn’t prefer minimum guys although he is certain they can be given counselling, coaching and learning inputs to do better.

Malia reasons, “Minimum guys beyond a point are a cost drag for a company. The minimum guys do not accept that they are minimum. Everyone is a legend in their minds. That is how conflicts emerge in performance reviews. The minimum guys compare themselves with the maximum guys and feel frustrated. They end up vitiating the climate, thus pushing the morale down.”

Ravi Kumar, head – people & culture, SHE, Roche Diabetes Care India, is of the opinion that every individual has something in their heart that brings out the maximum guy avatar. On the other hand, one can also be a minimum guy when just doing the bare minimum suffices for certain situations. “I believe both the ‘maximum’ and ‘minimum’ guys exist in everyone. We just need to have the ability to understand this and work towards bringing out the maximum guy for the right reasons, which will bring value to the individual as well as the organisation.”

Kumar further enumerates, “The trick is to get the max guy out so as to harness his full potential. A good manager will be able to do that. It’s all about connecting the persons’ strength to the organisation’s goal.”

Clearly, minimum guys, along with the top-performers, are essential for a balanced workforce, but too much of anything can give rise to challenges.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.hrkatha.com/features/who-is-a-minimum-guy-why-does-an-organisation-need-him/

Continue Reading

HRTech

The Great HR Debate – Which skills will be critical for future resilience?

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The need to reskill and upskill has assumed great significance in the new normal. Last year, with the pandemic sweeping across the globe, people had to urgently acquire certain skills, which were the need of the hour.

“Are we racing towards reskilling? Which skills will be critical for future resilience?’ was the topic of the second session of The Great HR Debate – Talent Special, the virtual event held on June 11, 2021

“It is easy to inculcate technical skills, but the bigger part is played by behavioural skills. In my experience, when the behaviours are aligned and changed with the changing needs, it is easy to bring any change in the company”

Amit Sharma, CHRO, Volvo Group India

Amit Sharma, CHRO, Volvo Group India; Reetu Raina, CHRO, Quick Heal; Viekas K Khokha, head – HR, Dhanuka Agritech; Ravi Kumar, head – HR, Roche Diabetes Care India and Ashish Anand, CHRO, SAR Goup, were the speakers part of the panel. The session was moderated by Amit Gautam, CEO & founder, UpsideLMS.

Gautam opened the debate with an important message, that the need to reskill is a priority at this moment, amidst the rapid changes taking place all around.

“People are almost racing towards reskilling their workforce. Last year, businesses had to move to a different working model and that too, very fast. My interactions with some of the HR leaders and L&D heads, tell me that the biggest challenge being faced by businesses now is, skilling their workforce,” said Gautam.

“We had to provide people with devices and network to collaborate remotely. Farmers in the villages were literally trained by our people to use such tools. Also, there was this huge shift towards data storage. Everything went digital and people had to be trained to handle data digitally”

Viekas K Khokha, Head-HR, Dhanuka Agritech

While there was no dearth of challenges in L&D, many of which were unique to some industries, the one challenge common across industries was remote working.

“Accessibility to customers and patients is something we require. Earlier, my workforce was used to face-to-face conversations with people, but now everything is virtual. So we had to unlearn and learn very fast in this situation,” said Kumar.

Khokha, who comes from an agri-tech sector, also mentioned the same thing. “We had to provide people with devices and network to collaborate remotely. Farmers in the villages were literally trained by our people to use such tools. Also, there was this huge shift towards data storage. Everything went digital and people had to be trained to handle data digitally,” mentioned Khokha.

“The talent gap in the cybersecurity sector is huge and is increasing with each passing year. So, there is a big upskilling movement happening at the Company to build talent and cater to the needs of the business. We decided to build talent rather than buy it, because buying from the market involves a lot of cost and is not a long-term solution”

Reetu Raina, CHRO, Quick Heal

As many people were struggling with remote working, for Quick Heal, there was an upsurge in business, with security of data in the digital world becoming more important for businesses everywhere.

“People are almost racing towards reskilling their workforce. Last year, businesses had to move to a different working model and that too, very fast. My interactions with some of the HR leaders and L&D heads, tell me that the biggest challenge being faced by businesses now is, skilling their workforce”

Amit Gautam, CEO & Founder, UpsideLMS

However, as pointed out by Raina, there is a huge shortage of talent. “The talent gap in the cybersecurity sector is huge and is increasing with each passing year. So, there is a big upskilling movement happening at the Company to build talent and cater to the needs of the business. We decided to build talent rather than buy it, because buying from the market involves a lot of cost and is not a long-term solution,” explained Raina.

She also stated that the education institutes do not train students to teach the principles of data breach, which is a cause of concern.

Being from the essential services sector, Kumar believes in the need to change the mindset of the people. “With all my workforce working in the field, the mindset we required was that of ‘serving people at any cost’. Come what may, we had to work and there was no option to work from home,” shared Kumar.

“We were able to see growth even amidst the pandemic. First we assured everyone that there would be no layoffs in the company, which allayed people’s fears and uncertainties. Then we decentralised our structure and trained and empowered local leaders to take decisions, which resulted in greater productivity”

Ashish Anand, CHRO, SAR Group

“There is a greater need for leaders to be empathetic

Another aspect the panel debated was of the demand for soft skills in people, especially leaders amidst the challenging situation of today. “It is easy to inculcate technical skills, but the bigger part is played by behavioural skills. In my experience, when the behaviours are aligned and changed with the changing needs, it is easy to bring any change in the company,” enunciated Sharma.

towards people and become more like coaches and wellbeing managers to their people. Because at this time, the need is to understand people and take decisions accordingly,” added Khokha.

“With all my workforce working in the field, the mindset we required was that of ‘serving people at any cost’. Come what may, we had to work and there was no option to work from home”

Ravi Kumar, Head-HR, Roche Diabetes Care India

Anand shared that they were able to inculcate the above-mentioned skills in their workforce and also empower their local managers and leaders to take decisions.

“We were able to see growth even amidst the pandemic. First we assured everyone that there would be no layoffs in the company, which allayed people’s fears and uncertainties. Then we decentralised our structure and trained and empowered local leaders to take decisions, which resulted in greater productivity,” revealed Anand.

The panel concluded by listing out some of the key skills that industries are looking out for, which are, the abilities to work in a remote environment, handle ambiguity, be resilient and learn and adapt to all kinds of situations.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.hrkatha.com/news/events-news/the-great-hr-debate-which-skills-will-be-critical-for-future-resilience/

Continue Reading

HRTech

The Great HR Debate – Which skills will be critical for future resilience?

Published

on

The need to reskill and upskill has assumed great significance in the new normal. Last year, with the pandemic sweeping across the globe, people had to urgently acquire certain skills, which were the need of the hour.

“Are we racing towards reskilling? Which skills will be critical for future resilience?’ was the topic of the second session of The Great HR Debate – Talent Special, the virtual event held on June 11, 2021

“It is easy to inculcate technical skills, but the bigger part is played by behavioural skills. In my experience, when the behaviours are aligned and changed with the changing needs, it is easy to bring any change in the company”

Amit Sharma, CHRO, Volvo Group India

Amit Sharma, CHRO, Volvo Group India; Reetu Raina, CHRO, Quick Heal; Viekas K Khokha, head – HR, Dhanuka Agritech; Ravi Kumar, head – HR, Roche Diabetes Care India and Ashish Anand, CHRO, SAR Goup, were the speakers part of the panel. The session was moderated by Amit Gautam, CEO & founder, UpsideLMS.

Gautam opened the debate with an important message, that the need to reskill is a priority at this moment, amidst the rapid changes taking place all around.

“People are almost racing towards reskilling their workforce. Last year, businesses had to move to a different working model and that too, very fast. My interactions with some of the HR leaders and L&D heads, tell me that the biggest challenge being faced by businesses now is, skilling their workforce,” said Gautam.

“We had to provide people with devices and network to collaborate remotely. Farmers in the villages were literally trained by our people to use such tools. Also, there was this huge shift towards data storage. Everything went digital and people had to be trained to handle data digitally”

Viekas K Khokha, Head-HR, Dhanuka Agritech

While there was no dearth of challenges in L&D, many of which were unique to some industries, the one challenge common across industries was remote working.

“Accessibility to customers and patients is something we require. Earlier, my workforce was used to face-to-face conversations with people, but now everything is virtual. So we had to unlearn and learn very fast in this situation,” said Kumar.

Khokha, who comes from an agri-tech sector, also mentioned the same thing. “We had to provide people with devices and network to collaborate remotely. Farmers in the villages were literally trained by our people to use such tools. Also, there was this huge shift towards data storage. Everything went digital and people had to be trained to handle data digitally,” mentioned Khokha.

“The talent gap in the cybersecurity sector is huge and is increasing with each passing year. So, there is a big upskilling movement happening at the Company to build talent and cater to the needs of the business. We decided to build talent rather than buy it, because buying from the market involves a lot of cost and is not a long-term solution”

Reetu Raina, CHRO, Quick Heal

As many people were struggling with remote working, for Quick Heal, there was an upsurge in business, with security of data in the digital world becoming more important for businesses everywhere.

“People are almost racing towards reskilling their workforce. Last year, businesses had to move to a different working model and that too, very fast. My interactions with some of the HR leaders and L&D heads, tell me that the biggest challenge being faced by businesses now is, skilling their workforce”

Amit Gautam, CEO & Founder, UpsideLMS

However, as pointed out by Raina, there is a huge shortage of talent. “The talent gap in the cybersecurity sector is huge and is increasing with each passing year. So, there is a big upskilling movement happening at the Company to build talent and cater to the needs of the business. We decided to build talent rather than buy it, because buying from the market involves a lot of cost and is not a long-term solution,” explained Raina.

She also stated that the education institutes do not train students to teach the principles of data breach, which is a cause of concern.

Being from the essential services sector, Kumar believes in the need to change the mindset of the people. “With all my workforce working in the field, the mindset we required was that of ‘serving people at any cost’. Come what may, we had to work and there was no option to work from home,” shared Kumar.

“We were able to see growth even amidst the pandemic. First we assured everyone that there would be no layoffs in the company, which allayed people’s fears and uncertainties. Then we decentralised our structure and trained and empowered local leaders to take decisions, which resulted in greater productivity”

Ashish Anand, CHRO, SAR Group

“There is a greater need for leaders to be empathetic

Another aspect the panel debated was of the demand for soft skills in people, especially leaders amidst the challenging situation of today. “It is easy to inculcate technical skills, but the bigger part is played by behavioural skills. In my experience, when the behaviours are aligned and changed with the changing needs, it is easy to bring any change in the company,” enunciated Sharma.

towards people and become more like coaches and wellbeing managers to their people. Because at this time, the need is to understand people and take decisions accordingly,” added Khokha.

“With all my workforce working in the field, the mindset we required was that of ‘serving people at any cost’. Come what may, we had to work and there was no option to work from home”

Ravi Kumar, Head-HR, Roche Diabetes Care India

Anand shared that they were able to inculcate the above-mentioned skills in their workforce and also empower their local managers and leaders to take decisions.

“We were able to see growth even amidst the pandemic. First we assured everyone that there would be no layoffs in the company, which allayed people’s fears and uncertainties. Then we decentralised our structure and trained and empowered local leaders to take decisions, which resulted in greater productivity,” revealed Anand.

The panel concluded by listing out some of the key skills that industries are looking out for, which are, the abilities to work in a remote environment, handle ambiguity, be resilient and learn and adapt to all kinds of situations.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.hrkatha.com/news/events-news/the-great-hr-debate-which-skills-will-be-critical-for-future-resilience/

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