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Singapore goes online in hunt for intelligence officers

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Singapore has turned to the world wide web in its hunt for intelligence officers from “diverse backgrounds”. The Security and Intelligence Division (SID) has unveiled its official website today, 55 years after it was established inn 1966. 

Parked under the Ministry of Defence (Mindef), SID is the country’s external intelligence agency responsible for safeguarding the nation against external threats. It provides intelligence and assessments to local government agencies, as well as analyses global developments that may affect Singapore’s security and national interests. 

These include transnational threats such as cybersecurity and terrorism, geopolitics, and foreign relations, according to a statement released Monday by Mindef. SID also communicates with foreign intelligence and security agencies, sharing information and insights on countering transnational threats. 

With the launch of its website, the agency said it hoped to provide some idea of its operations, even though much of these remained classified for national security reasons. In doing so, it aimed to attract a wider spectrum of recruits to join the agency. 

An SID spokesperson said: “Singapore is facing challenging security issues in an increasingly complex and volatile world. The information we collect and analyse to detect and counter threats comes from wide and varied sources. The technologies to make sense of such information are evolving rapidly. 

“By increasing SID’s visibility, the website will help us to recruit Singaporeans from diverse backgrounds with the right values and expertise who can contribute towards our mission. It will also help us to strengthen existing linkages and forge new partnerships.”

According to the website, the agency offers roles across five key areas including technology, operations, and research. Specialised skills it seeks in technology include cybersecurity, data science and engineering, and software engineering, while roles in operations require specialised skills in cybersecurity and threat analysis and investigation. 

SID’s past counter-terrorism work led to the arrests of Jemaah Islamiyah terrorists who fled Singapore in the early 2000s and foiled a terror group’s plot to launch an attack on the Marina Bay Sands integrated resort in 2016, Mindef said. 

The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) in March 2020 restructured to boost its capabilities to address emerging threats in cyber, counter-terrorism, and maritime. In cyber defence, specifically, Mindef and SAF said they would build up capabilities to safeguard against foreign actors that posed cyber threats to Singapore’s national security. 

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/singapore-goes-online-in-hunt-for-intelligence-officers/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

ZDNET

Industry once again warns Australian government about falling behind in tech

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The Australian Academy of Science has published a policy primer calling for the federal government to place emerging digital technologies higher up the priority list.

“Australia risks falling behind as a technologically-driven nation unless we recognise emerging digital technologies as a central, independent sector in its own right, warranting investment in the core aspects of research, innovation, and workforce development,” the organisation wrote.

In the policy primer [PDF], the government-endorsed, not-for-profit organisation warned that Australia could potentially lag behind global peers, saying other nations such as Canada, France, the UK, and the US have placed more resources towards prioritising digital technologies as a strategy to bolster competitiveness.

Australia’s digital innovation earnings relative to its GDP was almost four percentage points lower than the OECD average of 11.2%, the organisation said.

To address this, the organisation put forward three recommendations that it believes would help Australia’s digital technology capability and innovation keep pace with other countries.

The recommendations are to elevate emerging digital technologies as a national science and innovation priority; include research and innovation in emerging digital technologies in the 2021 Research Infrastructure Roadmap; and recognise emerging digital technologies as an independent growth sector.

The Australian Academy of Science added that more investment is needed towards improving the digital literacy of Australians. Referring to RMIT University’s digital inclusion index, it said Australians with lower income, employment, and education have increasingly fallen behind in this area.

Kaspersky APAC managing director Chris Connell has also pushed for stronger promotion of security awareness and digital education saying that government needed to work more closely with industry to achieve this.

“We’re facing security challenges that put a strain on cybersecurity resources. Investing in cyber talent and promoting security awareness and digital education are the keys to success in building cyber resilient digital societies and economies,” Connell said.

“We need to move from the ‘needs’ to actually delivering on this — if we don’t, and the way the world is changing, there will be more and more risk moving forward.”

While the Australian Academy of Science did note the federal government’s recent digital economy strategy and modern manufacturing strategy were a “welcome signal”, it gave the caveat that government still needed to recognise the importance of building scientific capability behind the digital economy, both from an investment and narrative point of view.

“The national narrative and strategy for Australia’s digital economy needs to address the fundamental importance of building and maintaining scientific capabilities in emerging digital technologies to drive investment and build sovereign capability and capacity,” it wrote.

Following a similar theme, the Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA) a few weeks ago expressed concerns that the federal government was not placing enough resources into commercialising emerging technology, such as quantum computing.

“We are in a position of thought leadership and in some ways, we do lead the way. But our concern is that based on global trends, if we don’t take the steps necessary to maintain our position, and we’re not taking those steps, then we will in fact lose our leadership position, lose our resources, lose our IP, lose our skills, and our thought leaders,” AIIA CEO Ron Gauci said at the time. 

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/industry-once-again-warns-australian-government-about-falling-behind-in-tech/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Industry once again warns Australian government about falling behind in tech

Published

on

The Australian Academy of Science has published a policy primer calling for the federal government to place emerging digital technologies higher up the priority list.

“Australia risks falling behind as a technologically-driven nation unless we recognise emerging digital technologies as a central, independent sector in its own right, warranting investment in the core aspects of research, innovation, and workforce development,” the organisation wrote.

In the policy primer [PDF], the government-endorsed, not-for-profit organisation warned that Australia could potentially lag behind global peers, saying other nations such as Canada, France, the UK, and the US have placed more resources towards prioritising digital technologies as a strategy to bolster competitiveness.

Australia’s digital innovation earnings relative to its GDP was almost four percentage points lower than the OECD average of 11.2%, the organisation said.

To address this, the organisation put forward three recommendations that it believes would help Australia’s digital technology capability and innovation keep pace with other countries.

The recommendations are to elevate emerging digital technologies as a national science and innovation priority; include research and innovation in emerging digital technologies in the 2021 Research Infrastructure Roadmap; and recognise emerging digital technologies as an independent growth sector.

The Australian Academy of Science added that more investment is needed towards improving the digital literacy of Australians. Referring to RMIT University’s digital inclusion index, it said Australians with lower income, employment, and education have increasingly fallen behind in this area.

Kaspersky APAC managing director Chris Connell has also pushed for stronger promotion of security awareness and digital education saying that government needed to work more closely with industry to achieve this.

“We’re facing security challenges that put a strain on cybersecurity resources. Investing in cyber talent and promoting security awareness and digital education are the keys to success in building cyber resilient digital societies and economies,” Connell said.

“We need to move from the ‘needs’ to actually delivering on this — if we don’t, and the way the world is changing, there will be more and more risk moving forward.”

While the Australian Academy of Science did note the federal government’s recent digital economy strategy and modern manufacturing strategy were a “welcome signal”, it gave the caveat that government still needed to recognise the importance of building scientific capability behind the digital economy, both from an investment and narrative point of view.

“The national narrative and strategy for Australia’s digital economy needs to address the fundamental importance of building and maintaining scientific capabilities in emerging digital technologies to drive investment and build sovereign capability and capacity,” it wrote.

Following a similar theme, the Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA) a few weeks ago expressed concerns that the federal government was not placing enough resources into commercialising emerging technology, such as quantum computing.

“We are in a position of thought leadership and in some ways, we do lead the way. But our concern is that based on global trends, if we don’t take the steps necessary to maintain our position, and we’re not taking those steps, then we will in fact lose our leadership position, lose our resources, lose our IP, lose our skills, and our thought leaders,” AIIA CEO Ron Gauci said at the time. 

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PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/industry-once-again-warns-australian-government-about-falling-behind-in-tech/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Westpac has blocked 24,000 abusive messages in payments

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Westpac said it has managed to block some 24,000 transactions that were deemed as abusive payments.

In its environment, social, and governance strategy update, the bank also noted it required 19,000 customers to change the language they used in transaction descriptions before their payments could be accepted and processed.

The bank added it issued more than 800 warning letters and account suspensions and reported more than 70 customers to authorities for abusive payments.  

The bank announced earlier in the year it would not tolerate any messages containing abuse being sent in transaction descriptions. Terms considered inappropriate by the bank range from swear words through to domestic violence threats.

“We want to create a safer digital banking experience for our customers and send a clear signal that abusive messages in payment transactions will not be tolerated,” Westpac general manager of customer solutions Lisa Pogonoski previously said.

To contain such behaviour, the red and black bank rolled out a new tool enabling customers to report abuse and harassment received in the payment transaction description for inbound payments.

The bank also deployed technology to monitor outgoing payments sent through its online and mobile banking platforms, which blocks certain transactions containing inappropriate or offensive language in real-time.

In other updates, Westpac highlighted that in relation to its Customer Outcomes and Risk Excellence (CORE) program, it has completed 104 out of 327 planned activities designed to uplift the bank’s management and governance of risk. These included upgrading its transaction screen software and settings, identifying data points and establishing automated reconciliations and checks, using analytics to improve detection, and improving risk reporting through a new insights platform.

For the first half the 2022 financial year, Westpac highlighted tech expenses increased AU$40 million, attributing part of the rise was relating to the CORE program. This was off the back of a profit increase, posting AU$3.4 billion.  

IF YOU OR ANYONE YOU KNOW IN AUSTRALIA NEEDS HELP CONTACT ONE OF THESE SERVICES:

  • National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service on 1800 737 732
  • MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978
  • Lifeline on 13 11 14
  • Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800
  • Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36
  • Headspace on 1800 650 890
  • In an emergency or if you’re not feeling safe, always call 000

MORE FROM WESTPAC

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/westpac-has-blocked-24000-abusive-messages-in-payments/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Westpac has blocked 24,000 abusive messages in payments

Published

on

Westpac said it has managed to block some 24,000 transactions that were deemed as abusive payments.

In its environment, social, and governance strategy update, the bank also noted it required 19,000 customers to change the language they used in transaction descriptions before their payments could be accepted and processed.

The bank added it issued more than 800 warning letters and account suspensions and reported more than 70 customers to authorities for abusive payments.  

The bank announced earlier in the year it would not tolerate any messages containing abuse being sent in transaction descriptions. Terms considered inappropriate by the bank range from swear words through to domestic violence threats.

“We want to create a safer digital banking experience for our customers and send a clear signal that abusive messages in payment transactions will not be tolerated,” Westpac general manager of customer solutions Lisa Pogonoski previously said.

To contain such behaviour, the red and black bank rolled out a new tool enabling customers to report abuse and harassment received in the payment transaction description for inbound payments.

The bank also deployed technology to monitor outgoing payments sent through its online and mobile banking platforms, which blocks certain transactions containing inappropriate or offensive language in real-time.

In other updates, Westpac highlighted that in relation to its Customer Outcomes and Risk Excellence (CORE) program, it has completed 104 out of 327 planned activities designed to uplift the bank’s management and governance of risk. These included upgrading its transaction screen software and settings, identifying data points and establishing automated reconciliations and checks, using analytics to improve detection, and improving risk reporting through a new insights platform.

For the first half the 2022 financial year, Westpac highlighted tech expenses increased AU$40 million, attributing part of the rise was relating to the CORE program. This was off the back of a profit increase, posting AU$3.4 billion.  

IF YOU OR ANYONE YOU KNOW IN AUSTRALIA NEEDS HELP CONTACT ONE OF THESE SERVICES:

  • National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service on 1800 737 732
  • MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978
  • Lifeline on 13 11 14
  • Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800
  • Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36
  • Headspace on 1800 650 890
  • In an emergency or if you’re not feeling safe, always call 000

MORE FROM WESTPAC

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/westpac-has-blocked-24000-abusive-messages-in-payments/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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