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Potential Drug Interaction Between Warfarin, COVID-19 Treatment Reported

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A probable drug interaction was observed in 2 patients taking warfarin who were initiated on remdesivir and dexamethasone for the treatment of COVID-19, according to a case series recently published in the Journal of Pharmacy Practice.

The patients, a 71-year-old man and a 62 year-old-man, both on long-term warfarin therapy, presented to the emergency department with symptoms of COVID-19. Per the report, each patient’s international normalized ratio (INR) was within their specific goal and both denied any diet, lifestyle, or medication changes prior to admission.

“During admission, both patients experienced a marked elevation in INR within 24 to 48 hours of the initiation of remdesivir with dexamethasone for COVID-19 pneumonia directed therapy,” the authors reported. After several days of modification to their warfarin doses, both patients were stable enough for discharge and were counseled to continue monitoring per the instructions of their outpatient pharmacist.


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Although the exact mechanism of action resulting in the interaction between dexamethasone, remdesivir, and warfarin is unknown, the authors concluded that there is potential for interaction based on a calculated Drug Interaction Probability Scale score of 5. “This probable interaction is demonstrated by marked INR elevations within 24 to 48 hours of initiation of the combination in 2 cases with patients with historically stable INR history,” the authors stated.

Reference

Landayan RP, Saint-Felix S, Williams A. Probable interaction between warfarin and the combination of remdesivir with dexamethasone for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treatment: A 2 case report. J. Pharm. Pract. [Published online April 5, 2021]. doi: 10.1177/08971900211008623

This article originally appeared on MPR

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Source: https://www.medicalbag.com/home/medicine/warfarin-remdesivir-dexamethasone-drug-interaction-cases/

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New Study Estimates More Than 900,000 People Have Died Of COVID-19 In U.S.

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Medical workers wait to vaccinate people at a pop-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic last month in Hollandale, Miss. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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A new study estimates that the number of people who have died of COVID-19 in the U.S. is more than 900,000, a number 57% higher than official figures.

Worldwide, the study’s authors say, the COVID-19 death count is nearing 7 million, more than double the reported number of 3.24 million.

The analysis comes from researchers at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, who looked at excess mortality from March 2020 through May 3, 2021, compared it with what would be expected in a typical nonpandemic year, then adjusted those figures to account for a handful of other pandemic-related factors.

The final count only estimates deaths “caused directly by the SARS-CoV-2 virus,” according to the study’s authors. SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers estimated dramatic undercounts in countries such as India, Mexico and Russia, where they said the official death counts are some 400,000 too low in each country. In some countries — including Japan, Egypt and several Central Asian nations — the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation’s death toll estimate is more than 10 times higher than reported totals.

“The analysis just shows how challenging it has been during the pandemic to accurately track the deaths — and actually, transmission — of COVID. And by focusing in on the total COVID death rate, I think we bring to light just how much greater the impact of COVID has been already and may be in the future,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, who heads the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

The group reached its estimates by calculating excess mortality based on a variety of sources, including official death statistics from various countries, as well as academic studies of other locations.

Then, it examined other mortality factors influenced by the pandemic. For example, some of the extra deaths were caused by increased opioid overdoses or deferred health care. On the other hand, the dramatic reduction in flu cases last winter and a modest drop in deaths caused by injury resulted in lower mortality in those categories than usual.

Researchers at UW ultimately concluded that the extra deaths not directly caused by COVID-19 were effectively offset by the other reductions in death rates, leaving them to attribute all of the net excess deaths to the coronavirus.

“When you put all that together, we conclude that the best way, the closest estimate, for the true COVID death is still excess mortality, because some of those things are on the positive side, other factors are on the negative side,” Murray said.

A worker sprays disinfectant inside a temporary quarantine center for COVID-19 patients this week in Hyderabad, India. Researchers estimate more than 400,000 people have died of COVID-19 in India than has been officially reported. Noah Seelam/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP via Getty Images

Experts are in agreement that official reports of COVID-19 deaths undercount the true death toll of the virus. Some countries only report deaths that take place in hospitals, or only when patients are confirmed to have been infected; others have poor health care access altogether.

“We see, for example, that when health systems get hit hard with individuals with COVID, understandably they devote their time to trying to take care of patients,” Murray said.

Because of that, many academics have sought to estimate a true COVID-19 death rate to understand better how the disease spreads.

The revised statistical model used by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation team produced numbers larger than many other analyses, raising some eyebrows in the scientific community.

“I think that the overall message of this (that deaths have been substantially undercounted and in some places more than others) is likely sound, but the absolute numbers are less so for a lot of reasons,” said William Hanage, an epidemiologist at Harvard University, in an email to NPR.

Last month, a group of researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University published a study in the medical journal JAMA that examined excess mortality rates in the U.S. through December.

While that team similarly found the number of excess deaths far exceeded the official COVID-19 death toll, it disagreed that the gap could be blamed entirely on COVID-19 and not other causes.

“Their estimate of excess deaths is enormous and inconsistent with our research and others,” said Dr. Steven Woolf, who led the Virginia Commonwealth team. “There are a lot of assumptions and educated guesses built into their model.”

Other researchers applauded the UW study, calling the researchers’ effort to produce a global model important, especially in identifying countries with small reported outbreaks but larger estimates of a true death toll, which could indicate the virus is spreading more widely than previously thought.

“We need to better understand the impact of COVID across the globe so that countries can understand the trajectory of the pandemic and figure out where to deploy additional resources, like testing supplies and vaccines to stop the spread,” said Jennifer Nuzzo, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins.

Researchers at UW also released an updated forecast for the COVID-19 death count worldwide, estimating that roughly 2.5 million more people will die of COVID-19 between now and Sept. 1, driven in part by the dramatic surge of cases in India.

In the United States, researchers estimated roughly 44,000 more people will die of COVID-19 by September.

NPR science correspondent Rob Stein contributed to this report.

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Source: https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/05/06/994287048/new-study-estimates-more-than-900-000-people-have-died-of-covid-19-in-u-s

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Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Adolescent Mental Health

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Even before the COVID-19 pandemic began, concerning mental health trends and major treatment gaps were noted among adolescents in the United States. According to data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 13.3% of US adolescents aged 12-17 experienced at least 1 episode of major depressive disorder in 2017, yet 60.1% of these individuals did not receive treatment for their illness.1

In addition, survey results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstrated increasing rates of US high school students experiencing persistent sadness or hopelessness (from approximately 26% in 2009 to 37% in 2019), serious contemplation of suicide (from 14% to 19%), suicide planning (from 11% to 16%), and suicide attempts (from 6% to 9%). The highest risk levels were observed for White, female, and sexual minority students compared with non-White, male, and heterosexual students.2

Early findings indicate that these issues are being further exacerbated by the current crisis, with an especially high risk of worsening mental health among individuals with pre-existing psychological problems. These results have shown increased symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder among youth of various age groups.3,5 “The number, severity and duration of these symptoms are influenced by age, history of trauma, psychological status before the event, hours spent watching media coverage of the event, having a family member who died and the presence or absence of social and economic supports,” wrote Hertz and Barrios in a paper published in February 2021 in Injury Prevention.2


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They noted that school closures may reduce access to mental health screening and care for vulnerable students, considering the large number of adolescents — nearly 3.5 million in 2018 — receiving such services in educational settings.2 These settings represent the only source of mental health services for many adolescents, particularly those from low‐income households and racial and ethnic minority groups. The authors thus emphasized the heightened importance of collaboration between schools and community health professionals to address the growing mental health needs of students.

Adolescents and other youth are also affected by the impact of the pandemic on their caregivers, including unemployment, financial and emotional stress, and fear of infection, highlighting the need for adults to receive adequate care and support as well.6,7 Some youth have been forced to spend more time in abusive or otherwise dysfunctional homes due to quarantine requirements.

“Assessing the relative safety of a child at home is one of the major challenges posed to mental health professionals during a pandemic,” according to a November 2020 paper co-authored by Cécile Rousseau, MD, researcher, psychiatrist, and professor in the division of social and transcultural psychiatry at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.6 “Fueled by parental stress and in the absence of the benevolent gaze of the school or daycare, the risk of maltreatment is increasing as the rate of cases reported to youth protection is decreasing.”

Providers at hospitals across the US are reporting alarming increases in rates of attempted and completed suicides among youth — especially teenagers. One school district in Las Vegas has lost 19 children to suicide since the pandemic began. Regarding the increasing number of pediatric patients presenting to hospitals nationwide with suicidal ideation, clinicians have described them as having “worse mental states” compared to similar patients typically seen before the pandemic.8

Such trends underscore the vital importance of youth outreach and creative intervention and support during these times. Mental health providers “must continue to advocate to ensure that families and children get the mental health support that they need to support resilience, to decrease family conflict and child maltreatment, and to decrease risk-taking, unsafe, and dangerous behaviors,” as stated in the November 2020 article.6

We recently interviewed Dr Rousseau to further discuss these issues and potential solutions.

Cécile Rousseau, MD

What are believed to be the reasons for the generally low rates of mental health treatment among adolescents even pre-pandemic?

I believe there are 2 main reasons: First, MH services are overall difficult to access and often not very user-friendly for youth. Although some emerging models are addressing this, they are not generalized. Second, there is a widespread tendency to confound psychological distress and its expression — through sadness, anxiety, and anger — and mental disorder.

The first is associated with life being hurtful, which is very common, while the second is associated with more individual vulnerabilities. Of course, the 2 phenomena overlap, but in past times, distress was not medicalized or an object of treatment. Rather, it was addressed through interpersonal networks, spirituality, and so on. In the past decades there has been a shift in paradigm.

How has the pandemic affected and exacerbated mental health issues in this population?

The pandemic has generated first an acute stress response — which is normal, with fear and panic reactions, among others. To a certain extent, this has supported adherence to public health measures. As time passes, this becomes a chronic stress reaction with predominant avoidance symptoms such as denial and minimization of the pandemic risk. Frustration and anger regarding constraints have also increased, leading to scapegoating through conspiracy theories, and to legitimation of violence.

These are widespread reactions, which are not within the disorder range. For many people with vulnerabilities, however, the pandemic has exacerbated their symptoms, except for some cases of phobia — particularly school phobia — or cyberdependence, as these individuals may enjoy the confinement.

What are the relevant recommendations for clinicians about how to address these issues in practice and advocate for their adolescent patients?

Clinically, outreach to our patients to maintain continuity of care is crucial. In cases of frequent family conflict, virtual care should be used cautiously as it may not provide the needed confidentiality and safety and may aggravate the family conflict in some cases.

For new cases, management should include decreasing the impact of the collateral consequences of the pandemic — most commonly from social isolation and lack of stimulation — on adolescents’ development.

What are some of the broader, longer-term solutions that are also warranted?

Schools and colleges should be at the forefront of prevention. In Canada, pediatricians have advocated for the return of youth to school and the preservation of their social network (not partying, of course!). Youth need their peers to pursue their individuation-separation task, and this has been made impossible during confinement. We need to find a balance between the security of the elderly and the fulfillment of adolescent developmental needs.

References

  1. Major depression. National Institute of Mental Health. Updated February 2019. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/major-depression.shtml
  2. Hertz MF, Barrios LC. Adolescent mental health, COVID-19, and the value of school-community partnerships. Inj Prev. 2021;27(1):85-86. doi:10.1136/injuryprev-2020-044050
  3. Rogers AA, Ha T, Ockey S. Adolescents’ perceived socio-emotional impact of COVID-19 and implications for mental health: results from a U.S.-based mixed-methods study. J Adolesc Health. 2021;68(1):43-52. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.039
  4. Liang L, Ren H, Cao R, et al. The effect of COVID-19 on youth mental healthPsychiatr Q. 2020;91(3):841-852. doi:10.1007/s11126-020-09744-3
  5. Ma Z, Zhao J, Li Y, et al. Mental health problems and correlates among 746 217 college students during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak in China. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020;29:e181. doi:10.1017/S2045796020000931
  6. Rousseau C, Miconi D. Protecting youth mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: a challenging engagement and learning process. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2020;59(11):1203-1207. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2020.08.007
  7. Chatterjee R. Make space, listen, offer hope: How to help a suicidal teen or child. NPR. Published online February 2, 2021. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962185779/make-space-listen-offer-hope-how-to-help-a-child-at-risk-of-suicide
  8. Chatterjee R. Child psychiatrists warn that the pandemic may be driving up kids’ suicide risk. NPR. Published online February 2, 2021. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962060105/child-psychiatrists-warn-that-the-pandemic-may-be-driving-up-kids-suicide-risk

This article originally appeared on Psychiatry Advisor

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Source: https://www.medicalbag.com/home/medicine/adolescent-mental-health-issues-are-further-exacerbated-by-the-covid-19-pandemic/

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Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Adolescent Mental Health

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Even before the COVID-19 pandemic began, concerning mental health trends and major treatment gaps were noted among adolescents in the United States. According to data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 13.3% of US adolescents aged 12-17 experienced at least 1 episode of major depressive disorder in 2017, yet 60.1% of these individuals did not receive treatment for their illness.1

In addition, survey results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstrated increasing rates of US high school students experiencing persistent sadness or hopelessness (from approximately 26% in 2009 to 37% in 2019), serious contemplation of suicide (from 14% to 19%), suicide planning (from 11% to 16%), and suicide attempts (from 6% to 9%). The highest risk levels were observed for White, female, and sexual minority students compared with non-White, male, and heterosexual students.2

Early findings indicate that these issues are being further exacerbated by the current crisis, with an especially high risk of worsening mental health among individuals with pre-existing psychological problems. These results have shown increased symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder among youth of various age groups.3,5 “The number, severity and duration of these symptoms are influenced by age, history of trauma, psychological status before the event, hours spent watching media coverage of the event, having a family member who died and the presence or absence of social and economic supports,” wrote Hertz and Barrios in a paper published in February 2021 in Injury Prevention.2


Continue Reading

They noted that school closures may reduce access to mental health screening and care for vulnerable students, considering the large number of adolescents — nearly 3.5 million in 2018 — receiving such services in educational settings.2 These settings represent the only source of mental health services for many adolescents, particularly those from low‐income households and racial and ethnic minority groups. The authors thus emphasized the heightened importance of collaboration between schools and community health professionals to address the growing mental health needs of students.

Adolescents and other youth are also affected by the impact of the pandemic on their caregivers, including unemployment, financial and emotional stress, and fear of infection, highlighting the need for adults to receive adequate care and support as well.6,7 Some youth have been forced to spend more time in abusive or otherwise dysfunctional homes due to quarantine requirements.

“Assessing the relative safety of a child at home is one of the major challenges posed to mental health professionals during a pandemic,” according to a November 2020 paper co-authored by Cécile Rousseau, MD, researcher, psychiatrist, and professor in the division of social and transcultural psychiatry at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.6 “Fueled by parental stress and in the absence of the benevolent gaze of the school or daycare, the risk of maltreatment is increasing as the rate of cases reported to youth protection is decreasing.”

Providers at hospitals across the US are reporting alarming increases in rates of attempted and completed suicides among youth — especially teenagers. One school district in Las Vegas has lost 19 children to suicide since the pandemic began. Regarding the increasing number of pediatric patients presenting to hospitals nationwide with suicidal ideation, clinicians have described them as having “worse mental states” compared to similar patients typically seen before the pandemic.8

Such trends underscore the vital importance of youth outreach and creative intervention and support during these times. Mental health providers “must continue to advocate to ensure that families and children get the mental health support that they need to support resilience, to decrease family conflict and child maltreatment, and to decrease risk-taking, unsafe, and dangerous behaviors,” as stated in the November 2020 article.6

We recently interviewed Dr Rousseau to further discuss these issues and potential solutions.

Cécile Rousseau, MD

What are believed to be the reasons for the generally low rates of mental health treatment among adolescents even pre-pandemic?

I believe there are 2 main reasons: First, MH services are overall difficult to access and often not very user-friendly for youth. Although some emerging models are addressing this, they are not generalized. Second, there is a widespread tendency to confound psychological distress and its expression — through sadness, anxiety, and anger — and mental disorder.

The first is associated with life being hurtful, which is very common, while the second is associated with more individual vulnerabilities. Of course, the 2 phenomena overlap, but in past times, distress was not medicalized or an object of treatment. Rather, it was addressed through interpersonal networks, spirituality, and so on. In the past decades there has been a shift in paradigm.

How has the pandemic affected and exacerbated mental health issues in this population?

The pandemic has generated first an acute stress response — which is normal, with fear and panic reactions, among others. To a certain extent, this has supported adherence to public health measures. As time passes, this becomes a chronic stress reaction with predominant avoidance symptoms such as denial and minimization of the pandemic risk. Frustration and anger regarding constraints have also increased, leading to scapegoating through conspiracy theories, and to legitimation of violence.

These are widespread reactions, which are not within the disorder range. For many people with vulnerabilities, however, the pandemic has exacerbated their symptoms, except for some cases of phobia — particularly school phobia — or cyberdependence, as these individuals may enjoy the confinement.

What are the relevant recommendations for clinicians about how to address these issues in practice and advocate for their adolescent patients?

Clinically, outreach to our patients to maintain continuity of care is crucial. In cases of frequent family conflict, virtual care should be used cautiously as it may not provide the needed confidentiality and safety and may aggravate the family conflict in some cases.

For new cases, management should include decreasing the impact of the collateral consequences of the pandemic — most commonly from social isolation and lack of stimulation — on adolescents’ development.

What are some of the broader, longer-term solutions that are also warranted?

Schools and colleges should be at the forefront of prevention. In Canada, pediatricians have advocated for the return of youth to school and the preservation of their social network (not partying, of course!). Youth need their peers to pursue their individuation-separation task, and this has been made impossible during confinement. We need to find a balance between the security of the elderly and the fulfillment of adolescent developmental needs.

References

  1. Major depression. National Institute of Mental Health. Updated February 2019. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/major-depression.shtml
  2. Hertz MF, Barrios LC. Adolescent mental health, COVID-19, and the value of school-community partnerships. Inj Prev. 2021;27(1):85-86. doi:10.1136/injuryprev-2020-044050
  3. Rogers AA, Ha T, Ockey S. Adolescents’ perceived socio-emotional impact of COVID-19 and implications for mental health: results from a U.S.-based mixed-methods study. J Adolesc Health. 2021;68(1):43-52. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.039
  4. Liang L, Ren H, Cao R, et al. The effect of COVID-19 on youth mental healthPsychiatr Q. 2020;91(3):841-852. doi:10.1007/s11126-020-09744-3
  5. Ma Z, Zhao J, Li Y, et al. Mental health problems and correlates among 746 217 college students during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak in China. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020;29:e181. doi:10.1017/S2045796020000931
  6. Rousseau C, Miconi D. Protecting youth mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: a challenging engagement and learning process. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2020;59(11):1203-1207. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2020.08.007
  7. Chatterjee R. Make space, listen, offer hope: How to help a suicidal teen or child. NPR. Published online February 2, 2021. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962185779/make-space-listen-offer-hope-how-to-help-a-child-at-risk-of-suicide
  8. Chatterjee R. Child psychiatrists warn that the pandemic may be driving up kids’ suicide risk. NPR. Published online February 2, 2021. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962060105/child-psychiatrists-warn-that-the-pandemic-may-be-driving-up-kids-suicide-risk

This article originally appeared on Psychiatry Advisor

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Source: https://www.medicalbag.com/home/medicine/adolescent-mental-health-issues-are-further-exacerbated-by-the-covid-19-pandemic/

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Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Adolescent Mental Health

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Even before the COVID-19 pandemic began, concerning mental health trends and major treatment gaps were noted among adolescents in the United States. According to data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 13.3% of US adolescents aged 12-17 experienced at least 1 episode of major depressive disorder in 2017, yet 60.1% of these individuals did not receive treatment for their illness.1

In addition, survey results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstrated increasing rates of US high school students experiencing persistent sadness or hopelessness (from approximately 26% in 2009 to 37% in 2019), serious contemplation of suicide (from 14% to 19%), suicide planning (from 11% to 16%), and suicide attempts (from 6% to 9%). The highest risk levels were observed for White, female, and sexual minority students compared with non-White, male, and heterosexual students.2

Early findings indicate that these issues are being further exacerbated by the current crisis, with an especially high risk of worsening mental health among individuals with pre-existing psychological problems. These results have shown increased symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder among youth of various age groups.3,5 “The number, severity and duration of these symptoms are influenced by age, history of trauma, psychological status before the event, hours spent watching media coverage of the event, having a family member who died and the presence or absence of social and economic supports,” wrote Hertz and Barrios in a paper published in February 2021 in Injury Prevention.2


Continue Reading

They noted that school closures may reduce access to mental health screening and care for vulnerable students, considering the large number of adolescents — nearly 3.5 million in 2018 — receiving such services in educational settings.2 These settings represent the only source of mental health services for many adolescents, particularly those from low‐income households and racial and ethnic minority groups. The authors thus emphasized the heightened importance of collaboration between schools and community health professionals to address the growing mental health needs of students.

Adolescents and other youth are also affected by the impact of the pandemic on their caregivers, including unemployment, financial and emotional stress, and fear of infection, highlighting the need for adults to receive adequate care and support as well.6,7 Some youth have been forced to spend more time in abusive or otherwise dysfunctional homes due to quarantine requirements.

“Assessing the relative safety of a child at home is one of the major challenges posed to mental health professionals during a pandemic,” according to a November 2020 paper co-authored by Cécile Rousseau, MD, researcher, psychiatrist, and professor in the division of social and transcultural psychiatry at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.6 “Fueled by parental stress and in the absence of the benevolent gaze of the school or daycare, the risk of maltreatment is increasing as the rate of cases reported to youth protection is decreasing.”

Providers at hospitals across the US are reporting alarming increases in rates of attempted and completed suicides among youth — especially teenagers. One school district in Las Vegas has lost 19 children to suicide since the pandemic began. Regarding the increasing number of pediatric patients presenting to hospitals nationwide with suicidal ideation, clinicians have described them as having “worse mental states” compared to similar patients typically seen before the pandemic.8

Such trends underscore the vital importance of youth outreach and creative intervention and support during these times. Mental health providers “must continue to advocate to ensure that families and children get the mental health support that they need to support resilience, to decrease family conflict and child maltreatment, and to decrease risk-taking, unsafe, and dangerous behaviors,” as stated in the November 2020 article.6

We recently interviewed Dr Rousseau to further discuss these issues and potential solutions.

Cécile Rousseau, MD

What are believed to be the reasons for the generally low rates of mental health treatment among adolescents even pre-pandemic?

I believe there are 2 main reasons: First, MH services are overall difficult to access and often not very user-friendly for youth. Although some emerging models are addressing this, they are not generalized. Second, there is a widespread tendency to confound psychological distress and its expression — through sadness, anxiety, and anger — and mental disorder.

The first is associated with life being hurtful, which is very common, while the second is associated with more individual vulnerabilities. Of course, the 2 phenomena overlap, but in past times, distress was not medicalized or an object of treatment. Rather, it was addressed through interpersonal networks, spirituality, and so on. In the past decades there has been a shift in paradigm.

How has the pandemic affected and exacerbated mental health issues in this population?

The pandemic has generated first an acute stress response — which is normal, with fear and panic reactions, among others. To a certain extent, this has supported adherence to public health measures. As time passes, this becomes a chronic stress reaction with predominant avoidance symptoms such as denial and minimization of the pandemic risk. Frustration and anger regarding constraints have also increased, leading to scapegoating through conspiracy theories, and to legitimation of violence.

These are widespread reactions, which are not within the disorder range. For many people with vulnerabilities, however, the pandemic has exacerbated their symptoms, except for some cases of phobia — particularly school phobia — or cyberdependence, as these individuals may enjoy the confinement.

What are the relevant recommendations for clinicians about how to address these issues in practice and advocate for their adolescent patients?

Clinically, outreach to our patients to maintain continuity of care is crucial. In cases of frequent family conflict, virtual care should be used cautiously as it may not provide the needed confidentiality and safety and may aggravate the family conflict in some cases.

For new cases, management should include decreasing the impact of the collateral consequences of the pandemic — most commonly from social isolation and lack of stimulation — on adolescents’ development.

What are some of the broader, longer-term solutions that are also warranted?

Schools and colleges should be at the forefront of prevention. In Canada, pediatricians have advocated for the return of youth to school and the preservation of their social network (not partying, of course!). Youth need their peers to pursue their individuation-separation task, and this has been made impossible during confinement. We need to find a balance between the security of the elderly and the fulfillment of adolescent developmental needs.

References

  1. Major depression. National Institute of Mental Health. Updated February 2019. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/major-depression.shtml
  2. Hertz MF, Barrios LC. Adolescent mental health, COVID-19, and the value of school-community partnerships. Inj Prev. 2021;27(1):85-86. doi:10.1136/injuryprev-2020-044050
  3. Rogers AA, Ha T, Ockey S. Adolescents’ perceived socio-emotional impact of COVID-19 and implications for mental health: results from a U.S.-based mixed-methods study. J Adolesc Health. 2021;68(1):43-52. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.039
  4. Liang L, Ren H, Cao R, et al. The effect of COVID-19 on youth mental healthPsychiatr Q. 2020;91(3):841-852. doi:10.1007/s11126-020-09744-3
  5. Ma Z, Zhao J, Li Y, et al. Mental health problems and correlates among 746 217 college students during the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak in China. Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020;29:e181. doi:10.1017/S2045796020000931
  6. Rousseau C, Miconi D. Protecting youth mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: a challenging engagement and learning process. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2020;59(11):1203-1207. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2020.08.007
  7. Chatterjee R. Make space, listen, offer hope: How to help a suicidal teen or child. NPR. Published online February 2, 2021. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962185779/make-space-listen-offer-hope-how-to-help-a-child-at-risk-of-suicide
  8. Chatterjee R. Child psychiatrists warn that the pandemic may be driving up kids’ suicide risk. NPR. Published online February 2, 2021. Accessed online February 7, 2021. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962060105/child-psychiatrists-warn-that-the-pandemic-may-be-driving-up-kids-suicide-risk

This article originally appeared on Psychiatry Advisor

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Source: https://www.medicalbag.com/home/medicine/adolescent-mental-health-issues-are-further-exacerbated-by-the-covid-19-pandemic/

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