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NFL’s Russell Okung to Bitcoin Energy Critic Elon Musk: ‘Stick to Space’

Unhappy with the Tesla and SpaceX CEO’s statements about Bitcoin’s energy consumption, Okung is fighting back with billboards.

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In brief

  • NFL player Russell Okung has launched a billboard campaign against Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, due to his recent comments on Bitcoin.
  • Okung is a well-known Bitcoin aficionado who reportedly converted half of his $13 million NFL salary for 2020 into BTC.

Carolina Panthers left tackle Russell Okung is an accomplished NFL veteran with 11 seasons under his belt, a Super Bowl win, and two Pro Bowl selections. But over the last couple years, he has become almost as well known as a Bitcoin aficionado, reportedly converting half of his NFL salary into the leading cryptocurrency and launching a “Bitcoin is_” educational campaign.

Now, Okung is setting his sights on a perceived opponent of Bitcoin and taking his BTC advocacy to new heights—thanks to physical billboards.

Today, in a riff on the common “stick to sports” critique often waged against professional athletes who engage in social commentary, Okung announced the launch of his “Stick to Space, Elon” campaign, which is meant to push back against SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s claims about Bitcoin and the environment in recent weeks.

The campaign will feature billboards in Miami, Florida beginning tomorrow, ahead of the start of this weekend’s Bitcoin 2021 conference, along with mobile billboards near SpaceX’s launch facility in Brownsville, Texas and Tesla’s facility in Santa Clara, California.

 

Each billboard will feature an image of Okung along with the message, “Stick to Space, Elon.” The two-week campaign will also include an online component. According to a press release, the billboards are “meant to provide a gentle reminder to the public that Musk has been around Bitcoin for only a few months and is not an authority in this domain.”

“Bitcoin is humanity’s best shot at freedom. The public narrative needed correction as Elon apparently misunderstands its true benefit to our species,” Okung told Decrypt via email. “No individual is a threat to Bitcoin in the grand scheme of things. In Elon’s words, it is inevitable. His impact on Bitcoin is temporary.”

Earlier this year, Musk was seen as a leading proponent of Bitcoin, following the lead of MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor in buying up large sums of the cryptocurrency to hold on his company’s balance sheet. In February, Tesla announced that it had purchased $1.5 billion worth of Bitcoin, and would also accept BTC as payment for its electric cars. Bitcoin’s price soared following the announcement.

Last month, however, Musk changed his tune. He tweeted that Tesla would no longer accept Bitcoin, stating that the firm was “concerned about rapidly increasing use of fossil fuels for Bitcoin mining and transactions.” Musk said that Tesla was also considering other, more energy-efficient cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin’s price sank and took the rest of the crypto market with it, while Bitcoin enthusiasts grimaced at Tesla’s due diligence process.

Since then, Musk has said he’s working with Dogecoin developers to help advance that meme-based cryptocurrency, and spoke with North American Bitcoin miners alongside Saylor. Some of the region’s mining firms have formed a Bitcoin Mining Council with plans to improve reporting of their energy usage and aim to convince international miners to follow suit. As of this writing, Bitcoin’s price is still more than 41% off of its all-time high set in April.

The Bitcoin network’s energy consumption has long been a controversial subject. Digiconomist estimates that its energy-intensive proof-of-work consensus model, which requires high-powered computers to solve equations to earn BTC rewards, uses about as much total power as the country of Pakistan. Bitcoin defenders claim that renewable energy is increasingly being used to power mining, however. For his part, Okung believes that Musk’s “declarations are simply false,” according to a press release.

Okung has been one of the most outspoken NFL athletes on Bitcoin, not only converting half of his 2020 base salary of $13 million—reportedly $6.5 million—but also supporting efforts such as the recent Bitcoin-branded car at the Indianapolis 500. Other players have since followed his lead in investing in cryptocurrency. NFL player Sean Culkin announced in April that he would convert his entire salary into Bitcoin, while seven-time Super Bowl champion Tom Brady recently confirmed that he holds undisclosed cryptocurrencies.

Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed by the author are for informational purposes only and do not constitute financial, investment, or other advice.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://decrypt.co/72564/nfl-russell-okung-bitcoin-elon-musk-stick-to-space

Blockchain

For the love of the loot: Blockchain, the metaverse and gaming’s blind spot

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The speed at which gaming has proliferated is matched only by the pace of new buzzwords inundating the ecosystem. Marketers and decision makers, already suffering from FOMO about opportunities within gaming, have latched onto buzzy trends like the applications of blockchain in gaming and the “metaverse” in an effort to get ahead of the trend rather than constantly play catch-up.

The allure is obvious, as the relationship between the blockchain, metaverse, and gaming makes sense. Gaming has always been on the forefront of digital ownership (one can credit gaming platform Steam for normalizing the concept for games, and arguably other media such as movies), and most agreed upon visions of the metaverse rely upon virtual environments common in games with decentralized digital ownership.

Whatever your opinion of either, I believe they both have an interrelated future in gaming. However, the success or relevance of either of these buzzy topics is dependent upon a crucial step that is being skipped at this point.

Let’s start with the example of blockchain and, more specifically, NFTs. Collecting items of varying rarities and often random distribution form some of the core “loops” in many games (i.e. kill monster, get better weapon, kill tougher monster, get even better weapon, etc.), and collecting “skins” (e.g. different outfits/permutation of game character) is one of the most embraced paradigms of micro-transactions in games.

The way NFTs are currently being discussed in relation to gaming are very much in danger of falling into this very trap: Killing the core gameplay loop via a financial fast track.

Now, NFTs are positioned to be a natural fit with various rare items having permanent, trackable, and open value. Recent releases such as “Loot (for Adventurers)” have introduced a novel approach wherein the NFTs are simply descriptions of fantasy-inspired gear and offered in a way that other creators can use them as tools to build worlds around. It’s not hard to imagine a game built around NFT items, à la Loot.

But that’s been done before… kind of. Developers of games with a “loot loop” like the one described above have long had a problem with “farmers”, who acquire game currencies and items to sell to players for real money, against the terms of service of the game. The solution was to implement in-game “auction houses” where players could instead use real money to purchase items from one another.

Unfortunately, this had an unwanted side-effect. As noted by renowned game psychologist Jamie Madigan, our brains are evolved to pay special attention to rewards that are both unexpected and beneficial. When much of the joy in some games comes from an unexpected or randomized reward, being able to easily acquire a known reward with real money robbed the game of what made it fun.

The way NFTs are currently being discussed in relation to gaming are very much in danger of falling into this very trap: Killing the core gameplay loop via a financial fast track. The most extreme examples of this phenomena commit the biggest cardinal sin in gaming — a game that is “pay to win,” where a player with a big bankroll can acquire a material advantage in a competitive game.

Blockchain games such as Axie Infinity have rapidly increased enthusiasm around the concept of “play to earn,” where players can potentially earn money by selling tokenized resources or characters earned within a blockchain game environment. If this sounds like a scenario that can come dangerously close to “pay to win,” that’s because it is.

What is less clear is whether it matters in this context. Does anyone care enough about the core game itself rather than the potential market value of NFTs or earning potential through playing? More fundamentally, if real-world earnings are the point, is it truly a game or just a gamified micro-economy, where “farming” as described above is not an illicit activity, but rather the core game mechanic?

The technology culture around blockchain has elevated solving for very hard problems that very few people care about. The solution (like many problems in tech) involves reevaluation from a more humanist approach. In the case of gaming, there are some fundamental gameplay and game psychology issues to be tackled before these technologies can gain mainstream traction.

We can turn to the metaverse for a related example. Even if you aren’t particularly interested in gaming, you’ve almost certainly heard of the concept after Mark Zuckerberg staked the future of Facebook upon it. For all the excitement, the fundamental issue is that it simply doesn’t exist, and the closest analogs are massive digital game spaces (such as Fortnite) or sandboxes (such as Roblox). Yet, many brands and marketers who haven’t really done the work to understand gaming are trying to fast-track to an opportunity that isn’t likely to materialize for a long time.

Gaming can be seen as the training wheels for the metaverse — the ways we communicate within, navigate, and think about virtual spaces are all based upon mechanics and systems with foundations in gaming. I’d go so far as to predict the first adopters of any “metaverse” will indeed be gamers who have honed these skills and find themselves comfortable within virtual environments.

By now, you might be seeing a pattern: We’re far more interested in the “future” applications of gaming without having much of a perspective on the “now” of gaming. Game scholarship has proliferated since the early aughts due to a recognition of how games were influencing thought in fields ranging from sociology to medicine, and yet the business world hasn’t paid it much attention until recently.

The result is that marketers and decision makers are doing what they do best (chasing the next big thing) without the usual history of why said thing should be big, or what to do with it when they get there. The growth of gaming has yielded an immense opportunity, but the sophistication of the conversations around these possibilities remains stunted, due in part to our misdirected attention.

There is no “pay to win” fast track out of this blind spot. We have to put in the work to win.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/09/16/for-the-love-of-the-loot-blockchain-the-metaverse-and-gamings-blind-spot/

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Blockchain

Crypto’s networked collaboration will drive Web 3.0

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Web 1.0 was the static web, and Web 2.0 is the social web, but Web 3.0 will be the decentralized web. It will move us from a world in which communities contribute but don’t own or profit, to one where they can through collaboration.

By breaking away from traditional business models centered around benefiting large corporations, Web3 brings the possibility of community-centered economies of scale. This collaborative spirit and its associated incentive mechanisms are attracting some of the most talented and ambitious developers today, unlocking projects that were previously not possible.

Web3 might not be the final answer, but it’s the current iteration, and innovation isn’t always obvious in the beginning.

Web3, as Ki Chong Tran once said, is “The next major iteration of the internet, which promises to wrest control from the centralized corporations that today dominate the web.” Web3-enabled collaboration is made possible by decentralized networks that no single entity controls.

In closed-source business models, users trust a business to manage funds and execute services. With open source projects, users trust the technology to perform these tasks. In Web2, the bigger network wins. In Web3, whoever builds the biggest network together wins.

In a decentralized world, not only is participation open to all, the incentive structure is designed so that the greater the number of participants, the more everybody succeeds.

Learning from Linux

Linux, which is behind a majority of Web2’s websites, changed the paradigm for how the internet was developed and provides a clear example of how collaborative processes can drive the future of technology. Linux wasn’t developed by an incumbent tech giant, but by a group of volunteer programmers who used networked collaboration, which is when people freely share information without central control.

In “The Cathedral & The Bazaar,” author Eric S. Raymond shares his observations of the Linux kernel development process and his experiences managing open source projects. Raymond depicts a time when the popular mindset was to develop complex operating systems carefully coordinated by a small, exclusionary group of people — “cathedrals,” which are corporations and financial institutions.

Linux evolved in a completely different way. Raymond explains, “Quality was maintained not by rigid standards or autocracy, but by the naively simple strategy of releasing every week and getting feedback from hundreds of users within days, creating a sort of Darwinian selection on the mutations introduced by developers. To the amazement of almost everyone, this worked quite well.” This Linux development model, or “bazaar” model as Raymond puts it, assumes that “bugs are generally shallow phenomena” when exposed to an army of hackers without significant coordination.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/09/16/cryptos-networked-collaboration-will-drive-web-3-0/

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Blockchain

Crypto’s networked collaboration will drive Web 3.0

Published

on

Web 1.0 was the static web, and Web 2.0 is the social web, but Web 3.0 will be the decentralized web. It will move us from a world in which communities contribute but don’t own or profit, to one where they can through collaboration.

By breaking away from traditional business models centered around benefiting large corporations, Web3 brings the possibility of community-centered economies of scale. This collaborative spirit and its associated incentive mechanisms are attracting some of the most talented and ambitious developers today, unlocking projects that were previously not possible.

Web3 might not be the final answer, but it’s the current iteration, and innovation isn’t always obvious in the beginning.

Web3, as Ki Chong Tran once said, is “The next major iteration of the internet, which promises to wrest control from the centralized corporations that today dominate the web.” Web3-enabled collaboration is made possible by decentralized networks that no single entity controls.

In closed-source business models, users trust a business to manage funds and execute services. With open source projects, users trust the technology to perform these tasks. In Web2, the bigger network wins. In Web3, whoever builds the biggest network together wins.

In a decentralized world, not only is participation open to all, the incentive structure is designed so that the greater the number of participants, the more everybody succeeds.

Learning from Linux

Linux, which is behind a majority of Web2’s websites, changed the paradigm for how the internet was developed and provides a clear example of how collaborative processes can drive the future of technology. Linux wasn’t developed by an incumbent tech giant, but by a group of volunteer programmers who used networked collaboration, which is when people freely share information without central control.

In “The Cathedral & The Bazaar,” author Eric S. Raymond shares his observations of the Linux kernel development process and his experiences managing open source projects. Raymond depicts a time when the popular mindset was to develop complex operating systems carefully coordinated by a small, exclusionary group of people — “cathedrals,” which are corporations and financial institutions.

Linux evolved in a completely different way. Raymond explains, “Quality was maintained not by rigid standards or autocracy, but by the naively simple strategy of releasing every week and getting feedback from hundreds of users within days, creating a sort of Darwinian selection on the mutations introduced by developers. To the amazement of almost everyone, this worked quite well.” This Linux development model, or “bazaar” model as Raymond puts it, assumes that “bugs are generally shallow phenomena” when exposed to an army of hackers without significant coordination.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/09/16/cryptos-networked-collaboration-will-drive-web-3-0/

Continue Reading

Blockchain

How To Sell Digital Art, What Are The Best Online Marketplaces?

The post How To Sell Digital Art, What Are The Best Online Marketplaces? appeared first on Coinpedia – Fintech & Cryptocurreny News Media| Crypto Guide

Selling artwork, also called print on demand (POD), is a widely used term for all artists who sell their artwork online. There are many companies that offer the possibility to join artist communities to show their work in personal galleries and interact with other artists to vote and comment on the work. All these communities …

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Selling artwork, also called print on demand (POD), is a widely used term for all artists who sell their artwork online.

All these communities offer to sell artwork in various sizes and finishes and even in different formats, and control the production and delivery of orders to customers.

Just upload your illustrations and digital art to the right portals.

Making money on the internet has been a challenge for many people looking for an alternative way to work online, and there are several platforms and websites to sell artwork online, to sell your photographs if you work as a photographer, or your Design and Illustration projects if you are a graphic designer. 

You can sign up to some of these sites, to sell your artwork online and make a profit in this market or earn a passive income online.

Being on these sites is usually free on most of them, although they charge a percentage if a sale is made.

Before sending your material, any digital goods, digital items or digital files read carefully the conditions and advantages that each of them offers.

It is relevant, on the other hand, that you have a blog or your own work/gallery (store) where you can display your work online.

On an art portal, and the more relevant it is, the more your work is diluted among the hundreds of artists who exhibit their works.

Can you make money selling digital art online?

Yes. It is entirely possible to earn passive income with art-based products. In other words, it is possible for you to make money with your digital art.

The Internet has created a network that facilitates communication between artists and their customers.

Through social media platforms and online marketplaces, you can build a reputation, be an authority in your industry, showcase your most interesting work, and earn a good passive income online

How to sell digital art online?

Let us show you some ways you can excel in communication and sales over the Internet:

1. Build your portfolio

No matter what you do as an artist: the first step is always to have a portfolio to show what you do. Put your best work in it, always thinking about the kind of project you want to be asked to do.

Your portfolio doesn’t need to contain all your art, so it’s best that you are selective and put only the pieces that show the best of your talent and study, that is strategic to captivate the public you want to reach, and that is the most important for your career.

This portfolio can be made in several ways.

A personal website about your work, pdf file in case you need to send it by email, or even use special online platforms for posting your work, such as Behance, DeviantArt, Flickr, 500px (specific for photography).

Creating a website and organizing the information

Create your own website, because this way you will have all the prominence and you will be creating a solid artist brand image.

Having an online store that does not charge a fee/commission per sale allows you the opportunity to put a good price on your photos and attract many customers.

On your own shop or website, you can make a portfolio for clients or people interested exclusively in your work.

You need to have a website that presents your works, biography, and resume in an organized and transparent way. It should function as a “Landing Page” so that people coming from other channels (social media and marketplaces) can get to know your work in more depth. We will see this better below.

Making a web page today is much easier. There are great free platforms like WordPress.org that provide all the tips on how to start this process.

You will need to create an address to put on your site, your DNS. To do this, go to a domain registrar or web host, sign up, and find an address that is available and easy to read and remember.

Very complicated addresses can hinder you when you go to tell people about it. Use for example: www.YOUR NAME.art.com

2. Be on the social networks

Your art needs to be on social media. Several art projects are gaining prominence on Instagram, Facebook, Youtube, and other platforms.

Using these media to publicize your work and gain visibility will bring you contacts with potential clients for illustrations, crafting, photography work, and various other artistic segments.

The network also allows you to contact other artists and conduct research to inspire your creations.

However, to position yourself well on social networks you need a strategy. For this reason, it is important to have a minimum amount of knowledge about how these platforms work in order to stand out in your publications. 

Once you have created your website, you should create social media accounts. 

We suggest Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. You probably already have them. But the tip stands: create new accounts, don’t mix your personal profile with your business one.

Social networks are going to be the easiest way to publicize your works.

The possibilities of sharing and boosting (paid publishing) increase the reach of your work too much. People seeing your works and becoming interested will be able to analyze them more thoroughly on your website.

In addition, in the past, for an artist to be recognized he had to be represented by a gallery, something very difficult to achieve.

Today, social networks allow much greater independence. Many achieve success with just a well-organized Instagram. Digital platforms have become a great way for artists to do business.

What to do on social media?

1) Make sure people can find you. Use your artist name as your username, not nicknames that only your inner circle knows or names you’ve created that have nothing to do with your real name.

2) Link your social networks to your website and vice versa.

3) Post good, relevant content regularly. It is very important that you take building your image to the public seriously.

4) When posting a work, post at least some information such as: technique, title, and values. The other information the person will find on your site.

5) Organize your works with custom hashtags (Instagram) and keywords (Pinterest). That way, someone who likes a certain subject, type, or series of your work can see all the similar works at once, without having to go through all your posts to find them.

6) Don’t use extremely common hashtags and keywords, like those that have 1 million images, like: #art, #artist, #painting, and so on. Your images disappear almost instantly into this vast sea. They just take up space and don’t lead anywhere.

7) When appropriate, post images of buyers satisfied with their newly purchased or installed purchases and displayed in their homes or businesses.

People like to see that their art is selling. If other people are buying, it also makes it more acceptable for them to buy.

8) It is important to know what time the audience that follows you is usually most present on social media, what days of the week, what type of publication they like most, etc. Having this information, you can schedule posts for the most convenient time. 

9) Don’t worry about the copyright of your images circulating on the internet. It is possible to watermark your photos with text adding applications such as Quick.

3. Selling art online

Social networks also enable you to sell digital art. In addition, you can set up your own store or use ready-made platforms to sell your digital products. 

Marketplaces

We don’t always have the technical knowledge to make our own website. We may also not have the inclination to manage social networks. If you fit these profiles, we suggest you pay someone else to do it.

By far the most capable for this are the art marketplaces. They are platforms responsible for exposing and promoting artists/collections.

What are the advantages of the marketplace?

1) Your work will certainly be seen more because the marketplaces already have a visiting public. In a simple analogy, it would be as if you put your product in a mall instead of the living room of your house.

The chances of a buyer entering the living room of your house are much smaller.

2) You don’t need to understand programming or SEO (search engine optimization tool that improves your ranking in google) to get started.

Even so, we advise you to do some research on this topic, it will help a lot in structuring your site.

3) Many buyers feel more comfortable buying from a site that offers them protection. Not to mention that the organization and presentation of the works, profile and exhibits on the marketplaces is usually very efficient.

4) Platforms can run more aggressive email marketing and social media marketing campaigns, monitoring potential customers who appreciate your work.

5) Before signing up on any site, read the terms and conditions very carefully.

Know what commission or percentage each site charges, understand what protections they offer, what users look for within the platform, see the sales made by the site, know everything you can that is relevant to your sales.

The 10 top online marketplaces to sell digital art

As a talented artist, you can sell your design work online to make more money this year.

Whether you are a graphic designer, illustrator, photographer, art director, or 3D artist, there is a market for high-quality designs and different ways to sell your digital art directly to the public.

Now it is simpler than ever to sell online, whether it is books, prints, t-shirts, 3D assets, any original artwork, you also have the option to sell digital files and other physical products.

Selling artwork online no longer requires a large investment of time and money to build your own online store, as there are many e-commerce sites that allow you to reach a wider online market.

Some art marketplaces have created a complete and robust system, and have incorporated essential tools and features such as different forms of logins, alternative payment methods, file delivery, and even have marketing tools that help you list and advertise your products. 

These are the 10 choices of sites to sell digital products, whether you are a professional or an amateur, you can make enough money from your projects to pay your bills, or even make a living as an artist.

Adobe Stock

One online marketplace where you can profit from your artwork are image banks. Adobe Stock is a service that provides access to millions of photos, videos, illustrations, graphic design, digital illustration, and vector graphics, 3D assets.

Here you can upload your photos, videos, vectors, and illustrations to Adobe Stock directly from Adobe Lightroom CC, Adobe Bridge CC, or over the Web.

You can receive the best royalties for your creative contributions.

Alamy

If you are looking to sell your work to an image site, Alamy is a great choice. Alamy uses images from graphic designers all over the world, as well as from photographers, reporters, and editors.

Through this site, you will have access to over 100,000 registered buyers. The site also includes about 50,000 contributing artists.

So there are many sales going on every day through this site. 

You can make good money using Alamy. In addition, this company offers 50% royalties for contributing artists.

Envato Marketplace

The Envato marketplace is a marketplace with a multitude of graphic resources for digital downloads. 

The online marketplace includes several other sites, including 3D Ocean for 3D templates, ThemeForest for website templates, and GraphicRiver for vectors and graphics.

Programmers can use the CodeCanyon site through the marketplace as well, while audio artists can use AudioJungle and photographers can use PhotoDune the VideoHive offers a library of unlimited premium movies and video effects.

Some companies and people are making money there. There are over one and a half million members across the Envato network, so a large consumer audience is waiting for you.

To start selling your artwork, you need to become an “author”.and sign up → Become an Author. From there, you will have access to your dashboard, where you can make customizations, turning the page into a selling point for your portfolio.

CanStockPhoto

CanStockPhoto is an image bank provider that licenses royalty-free images, photos, digital illustrations, photo clips, and footage files on behalf of photographers, illustrators, and cinematographers.

You can upload your artwork on the site to sell the images. First you need to create an account and provide three images for approval.

Once approved, you can sell your images and earn money based on the payment schedule .

Custom licenses receive a 50% payment, while prints and posters receive a 20% payment.  

Saatchi Art

One of the most popular online art marketplaces is Saatchi Art. This gallery goes further in terms of the type of art it displays. This is not just a place where you sell art prints or paintings, Saatchi Art also displays sculptures. You will find an audience specifically interested in buying any art, from photography, drawing, sculpture and physical print, and more and more art of different types and sizes.

The price range for the pieces is from $500 to over $10,000, and they can be limited edition or open edition, from artists from virtually all over the world.

To learn more about using this site to sell your art, be sure to check out the “Why Sell?” section.

This area of the site will provide you with lots of information, such as a guide to design pricing, image resolution, and shipping details.

You should consider: the site charges a small percentage of 30% for each of your sales, but will take care of the shipping processes.

Society6

In this online store, you can upload your designs, photographs, and illustrations, and your customers can choose what kind of products they want to buy: cell phone covers, home decor patterns, pillows, quilts, cups, furniture, and other products. You do not have to take care of the shipping. There is a base commission of 10%, except for physical printing, where you set the price.

Etsy

This is the place par excellence for handmade artists, handmade objects and materials for their production.

It has several digital resources to optimize sales from your personal page, and has already established itself as a place for lovers of unique and personalized objects. 

The Etsy store offers numerous options for people to sell any digital product. However if you have an Etsy account, you can sell digital downloads and build a good source of passive income online, as well as selling digital prints or you can sell paintings and make more money.

You have to consider: You will compete with over a million users, so your prices must be very competitive.

You will need to be careful with your prices, shipping policies and refunds to stand out from the rest and have a good profit margin.

DeviantART

deviantART is one of the largest online social networks for artists and art lovers, with over 30 million registered members on the platform.

As an open community, deviantART is a platform that allows emerging and established artists to exhibit, promote and share their work in a community dedicated solely to the arts.

The social network receives more than 160,000 daily files of original artwork, ranging from traditional media such as painting and sculpture to digital art, pixel art, film, and anime.

Flickr

Flickr is an artists’ network and a virtual image gallery where you can share your photos and get the most out of them. You can organize them in collections, join groups with the same interests.

CafePress

On this platform, users can make their own designs with simple online design tools, and then buy, share or sell them in their own online stores.

It is the site where everyone comes back for unique products that express what people love most (on average, about 130,000 new designs are added every week).

From the latest pop culture freaks, hobbies, activities, causes, and favorite interests, it’s easy to find unique designs and products on CafePress.com.

Can I sell digital art on Instagram?

Instagram some time ago made available a platform, still simple, but effective to encourage purchases on the social network. Through this feature, it is possible to price products, make a sales catalog and add a button for the purchase, which directs the customer directly to the sales page.

Instagram does not sell within the social network, so if you want to sell your artwork using Instagram Shop, you must have some basic requirements, such as an account associated with a Facebook page and also Facebook Business.

Articled sponsored by WePlay Collectibles. WePlay Collectibles is powered by Ethereum, a software platform that uses blockchain technology.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
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Source: https://coinpedia.org/guest-post/ways-to-sell-your-nft-and-digital-art/

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