Connect with us

Nano Technology

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties: New approach creates synthetic layered magnets with unprecedented level of control over their magnetic properties

Avatar

Published

on

Home > Press > Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties: New approach creates synthetic layered magnets with unprecedented level of control over their magnetic properties

The atomic landscape of chromium halides are illustrated. The magnetic chromium atoms appear as gray spheres and the non-magnetic ligand atoms as green (chlorine), orange (bromine), and magenta (iodine) spheres. CREDIT
Fazel Tafti
The atomic landscape of chromium halides are illustrated. The magnetic chromium atoms appear as gray spheres and the non-magnetic ligand atoms as green (chlorine), orange (bromine), and magenta (iodine) spheres. CREDIT
Fazel Tafti

Abstract:
The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of Science Advances.

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties: New approach creates synthetic layered magnets with unprecedented level of control over their magnetic properties


Chestnut Hill, MA | Posted on July 24th, 2020

The seemingly counter-intuitive method is based on a mechanism known as an indirect exchange interaction, according to Boston College Assistant Professor of Physics Fazel Tafti, a lead author of the report.

An indirect interaction is mediated between two magnetic atoms via a non-magnetic atom known as the ligand. The Tafti Lab findings show that by changing the composition of these ligand atoms, all the magnetic properties can be easily tuned.

“We addressed a fundamental question: is it possible to control the magnetic properties of a material by changing the non-magnetic elements?” said Tafti. “This idea and the methodology we report on are unprecedented. Our findings demonstrate a new approach to create synthetic layered magnets with unprecedented level of control over their magnetic properties.”

Magnetic materials are the backbone of most current technology, such as the magnetic memory in our mobile devices. It is common practice to tune the magnetic properties by modifying the magnetic atoms in a material. For example, one magnetic element, such as chromium, can be replaced with another one, such as iron.

The team studied ways to experimentally control the magnetic properties of inorganic magnetic materials, specifically, chromium halides. These materials are made of one Chromium atom and three halide atoms: Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine.

The central finding illustrates a new method of controlling the magnetic interactions in layered materials by using a special interaction known as the ligand spin-orbit coupling. The spin-orbit coupling is a property of an atom to re-orient the direction of spins – the tiny magnets on the electrons – with the orbital movement of the electrons around the atoms.

This interaction controls the direction and magnitude of magnetism. Scientists have been familiar with the spin-orbit coupling of the magnetic atoms, but they did not know that the spin-orbit coupling of the non-magnetic atoms could also be utilized to re-orient the spins and tune the magnetic properties, according to Tafti.

The team was surprised that they could generate an entire phase diagram by modifying the non-magnetic atoms in a compound, said Tafti, who co-authored the report with fellow BC physicists Ying Ran and Kenneth Burch, post-doctoral researchers Joseph Tang and Mykola Abramchuk, graduate student Faranak Bahrami, and undergraduate students Thomas Tartaglia and Meaghan Doyle. Julia Chan and Gregory McCandless of the University of Texas, Dallas, and Jose Lado of Finland’s Aalto University, were also part of the team.

“This finding puts forward a novel procedure to control magnetism in layered materials, opening up a pathway to create new synthetic magnets with exotic properties,” Tafti said. “Moreover, we found strong signatures of a potentially exotic quantum state associated to magnetic frustration, an unexpected discovery that can lead to an exciting new research direction.”

Tafti said the next step is to use these materials in innovative technologies such as magneto-optical devices or the new generation of magnetic memories.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ed Hayward
617-552-4826

@BostonCollege

Copyright © Boston College

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials: Experts call for global effort to clear hurdles to mass production July 27th, 2020

Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins July 24th, 2020

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse: Institute of Optics research sets record for shortest laser pulse for newly developed technology, work that has important applications in engineering and biomedicine July 24th, 2020

Russian scientists identified energy storage mechanism of sodium-ion battery anode July 24th, 2020

Magnetism

Researchers discover new boron-lanthanide nanostructure June 25th, 2020

Molecules with a spin on a topological insulator: a hybrid approach to magnetic topological states of matter May 1st, 2020

IKBFU and University of Oviedo Physicists tested new research model on magnetic materials: Soft magnetic ferromagnetic microwires are used for magnetic field sensors, as well as for encoding and reading information April 24th, 2020

Magnet research takes giant leap April 10th, 2020

Possible Futures

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials: Experts call for global effort to clear hurdles to mass production July 27th, 2020

Discovery of disordered nanolayers in intermetallic alloys: Resolving alloys’ strength-ductility trade-off and thermal instability July 24th, 2020

Photochromic bismuth complexes show great promise for optical memory elements July 24th, 2020

Russian scientists identified energy storage mechanism of sodium-ion battery anode July 24th, 2020

Memory Technology

Photochromic bismuth complexes show great promise for optical memory elements July 24th, 2020

Graphene-Adsorbate van der Waals bonding memory inspires ‘smart’ graphene sensors July 17th, 2020

Process for ‘two-faced’ nanomaterials may aid energy, information tech June 26th, 2020

EU Team Demonstrates Full Data-Transfer Silicon Photonics Module Delivering 100 Gb/s and Develops Building Blocks for Tb/s: COSMICC Project Breakthroughs ‘Will Answer Tremendous Market Needs with a Target Cost per Bit that Traditional Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Transceivers June 23rd, 2020

Discoveries

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials: Experts call for global effort to clear hurdles to mass production July 27th, 2020

Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins July 24th, 2020

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse: Institute of Optics research sets record for shortest laser pulse for newly developed technology, work that has important applications in engineering and biomedicine July 24th, 2020

Russian scientists identified energy storage mechanism of sodium-ion battery anode July 24th, 2020

Announcements

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials: Experts call for global effort to clear hurdles to mass production July 27th, 2020

Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins July 24th, 2020

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse: Institute of Optics research sets record for shortest laser pulse for newly developed technology, work that has important applications in engineering and biomedicine July 24th, 2020

Russian scientists identified energy storage mechanism of sodium-ion battery anode July 24th, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials: Experts call for global effort to clear hurdles to mass production July 27th, 2020

Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins July 24th, 2020

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse: Institute of Optics research sets record for shortest laser pulse for newly developed technology, work that has important applications in engineering and biomedicine July 24th, 2020

Russian scientists identified energy storage mechanism of sodium-ion battery anode July 24th, 2020

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Brazilian researchers develop an optical fiber made of gel derived from marine algae: Edible, biocompatible and biodegradable, these fibers have potential for various medical applications. The results are described in the journal Scientific Reports. July 24th, 2020

Photochromic bismuth complexes show great promise for optical memory elements July 24th, 2020

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse: Institute of Optics research sets record for shortest laser pulse for newly developed technology, work that has important applications in engineering and biomedicine July 24th, 2020

Scaling up the quantum chip: MIT engineers develop a hybrid process that connects photonics with ‘artificial atoms,’ to produce the largest quantum chip of its type July 10th, 2020

Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56269

Nano Technology

Important Traits To Look for in New Employees

Avatar

Published

on

No matter what industry you’re in, some job candidates simply won’t have the most important traits that they need to succeed. If you’re a hiring manager, it’s up to you to figure out if each candidate has what it takes. This doesn’t just apply to their technical skills, but their soft skills as well. They will need these to be successful in a more long-term setting. Here are some of the most important traits to look for in new employees.

Proactive

Accomplishments are very important to any interview, but it’s important to differentiate between actual achievements and things that have just happened to them. You want to hear about the times when the candidate took charge on their own, came up with their own idea, or led when no one else would. Having this trait ensures that you won’t have to micromanage everything they do.

Communication

All the skills in the world won’t make up for someone that can’t communicate well. This should be one of the first things you notice in an interview. If they are applying for a technical position, can they answer your questions succinctly? Do they shy away from things they do not know about? Every company is a team, and teams work best when their members can communicate effectively.

Resilience

There are a few questions you can ask to find out how resilient a potential candidate is:

  • When was the last time you failed?
  • Can you tell me about a difficult team member you had to work with?
  • What do you believe is your biggest weakness?
  • Was there a time when you overcame a large roadblock?

 

These are classic interview questions because they give employers insight into how the candidate will react when faced with challenges. Challenging things will happen to your new employee, no matter who they are, so it’s best to have someone that can take them in stride.

Motivation

An important trait to look for in any new hire, motivation must come from within. At a certain level, candidates shouldn’t be motivated by how much money you’ll pay them or what benefits they’ll get. Make sure that the person you hire is in it for the right reasons. Look for times when they are enthusiastic about what you’re saying or about the work they’ll do.

Ambition

Your potential new employee should have plans for their future. They should also know the pathway to get to where they want to be. Ambition is important because, without it, there is no reason for them to work hard. By showing them the path forward, you allow them to become the best version of themselves so they can keep going through the hard times.


Source: Christina Duron is a freelance writer for multiple online publications where she can showcase her affinity for all things digital. She has focused her career around digital marketing and writes to explore topics that spark her interest.

Continue Reading

Nano Technology

A shapeshifting material based on inorganic matter

Avatar

Published

on

Nov 30, 2020 (Nanowerk News) By embedding titanium-based sheets in water, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science has created a material using inorganic materials that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter using temperature changes. Science fiction often features inorganic life forms, but in reality, organisms and devices that respond to stimuli such as temperature changes are nearly always based on organic materials, and hence, research in the area of “adaptive materials” has almost exclusively focused on organic substances. However, there are advantages to using inorganic materials such as metals, including potentially better mechanical properties. Considering this, the RIKEN-led group decided to attempt to recreate the behavior displayed by organic hydrogels, but using inorganic materials. The inspiration for the material comes from an aquatic creature called a sea cucumber. Sea cucumbers are fascinating animals, related to starfishes (but not to cucumbers!) that have the ability to morph their skin from a hard layer to a kind of jelly, allowing them to throw out their internal organs – which are eventually regrown—to escape from predators. In the case of the sea cucumbers, chemicals released by their nervous systems trigger the change in the configuration of a protein scaffold, creating the change. To make it, the researchers experimented with arranging nanosheets—thin sheets of titanium oxide in this case—in water, with the nanosheets making up 14 percent and water 86 percent of the material by weight. schematic illustration of unilamellar titanate nanosheet a A schematic illustration of unilamellar titanate (IV) nanosheet (TiNS). Countercations are omitted for clarity. Open square indicates vacant sites. b–g Schematic illustrations of the hydrogel of TiNS (TiNS-Gel) in a repulsion-dominant state (TiNS-GelRepuls; b–d) and an attraction-dominant state (TiNS-GelAttract; e–g). When the electrostatic repulsion between TiNSs in an aqueous dispersion is strong enough, TiNSs spontaneously self-assemble into a long-periodicity lamellar architecture (c) in which their mobility is mutually restricted (d). As a result, their aqueous dispersion can exhibit a gel-like behavior, denoted as TiNS-GelRepuls. When TiNS-GelRepuls is heated above a critical temperature, the electrostatic repulsion becomes weaker than the competing van der Waals attraction, so that TiNSs abruptly stack tightly (g) to form an interconnected 3D network that can hold large quantities of water (f), denoted as TiNS-GelAttract. Because of the large difference in the topology of the internal structure between TiNS-GelRepuls and TiNS-GelAttract, this gel-to-gel transition is accompanied by drastic changes in the optical and mechanical properties. (© Nature Communications) (click on image to enlarge) According to Koki Sano of RIKEN CEMS, the first author of the paper (Nature Communications, “A mechanically adaptive hydrogel with a reconfigurable network consisting entirely of inorganic nanosheets and water”), “The key to whether a material is a soft hydrogel or a harder gel is based on the balance between attractive and repulsive forces among the nanosheets. If the repulsive forces dominate, it is softer, but if the attractive ones are strong, the sheets become locked into a three-dimensional network, and it can rearrange into a harder gel. By using finely tuned electrostatic repulsion, we tried to make a gel whose properties would change depending on temperature.” The group was ultimately successful in doing this, finding that the material changed from a softer repulsion-dominated state to a harder attraction-dominated state at a temperature of around 55 centigrade. They also found that they could repeat the process repeatedly without significant deterioration. “What was fascinating,” he continues, “is that this transition process is completed within just two seconds even though it requires a large structural rearrangement. This transition is accompanied by a 23-fold change in the mechanical elasticity of the gel, reminiscent of sea cucumbers.” To make the material more useful, they next doped it with gold nanoparticles that could convert light into heat, allowing them to shine laser light on the material to heat it up and change the structure. According to Yasuhiro Ishida of RIKEN CEMS, one of the corresponding authors of the paper, “This is really exciting work as it greatly opens the scope of substance that can be used in next-generation adaptive materials, and may even allow us to create a form of ‘inorganic life’.”

Source: https://feeds.nanowerk.com/~/639407215/0/nanowerk/agwb~A-shapeshifting-material-based-on-inorganic-matter.php

Continue Reading

Nano Technology

Nanoscopic barcodes set a new science limit

Avatar

Published

on

Nov 29, 2020 (Nanowerk News) Using barcodes to label and identify everyday items is as familiar as a trip to the supermarket. Imagine shrinking those barcodes a million times, from millimetre to nanometre scale, so that they could be used inside living cells to label, identify and track the building blocks of life or, blended into inks to prevent counterfeiting. This is the frontier of nanoengineering, requiring fabrication and controlled manipulation of nanostructures at atomic level – new, fundamental research, published in Nature Communications (“Nanorods with multidimensional optical information beyond the diffraction limit”), shows the possibilities and opportunities ahead. Schematic diagram to illustrate the route that leads to the formation of the nanorods a Schematic diagram to illustrate the route that leads to the formation of the nanorods. Conditions, including the well-controlled amount of surfactant concentration (OA-) and the relatively low concentration of shell precursor, have to be met, otherwise, nanoplates, nanodumbbells, and small nanoparticles from precursor self-nucleation, will form. b High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images of three typical heterogeneous nanorods, scale bar is 50 nm. c Large area HAADF-STEM image of 18-segment heterogeneous nanorods, scale bar is 100 nm. d Distance statistics of five pairwise NaErF4 segments (center-to-center of each pairwise with different color markers) of the heterogeneous nanorods in c. (© Nature Communications) (click on image to enlarge) The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) led collaboration developed a nanocrystal growth method that controls the growth direction, producing programmable atomic thin layers, arbitrary barcoded nanorods, with morphology uniformity. The result is millions of different kinds of nanobarcodes that can form a “library” for future nanoscale sensing applications. The researchers anticipate that such barcode structures will attract broad interests in a range of applications as information nanocarriers for bio-nanotechnology, life sciences, data storage, once they are incorporated into a variety of matrixes. Lead author Dr Shihui Wen said the research provides a benchmark that will open up the potential for engineering smaller nanophotonics devices. “The inorganic nanobarcode structures are rigid, and it is easy to control the composite, thickness and distance accuracy between different functional segments for geometrical barcoding beyond the optical diffraction limit. Because they are chemically and optically stable, the nanoscopic barcodes can be used as carriers for drug delivery and tracking into the cell, once the surface of the barcode structures is further modified and functionalized with probe molecules and cargos,” Dr Wen, from the UTS Institute of Biomedical Materials and Devices (IBMD), said. The team also had an additional breakthrough with the development of a novel, tandem decoding system, using super-resolution nanoscopy to characterize different optical barcodes within the diffraction limit. Senior author, UTS IBMD Director, Professor Dayong Jin said there was no commercial system available for this type of super resolution imaging. “We had to build the instrumentation to diagnose the sophisticated functions that can be intentionally built into the tiny nanorod. These together allow us to unlock the further potential for placing atomic molecules where we want them so we can continue to miniaturise devices. This was the first time we were able to use super resolution system to probe, activate and readout the specific functional segment within the nanorod. “Imagine a tiny device, smaller than one thousandth the width of a human hair, and we can selectively activate a particular region of that device, see the optical properties, quantify them. This is the science now showing many new possibilities,” he said. Professor Jin is also the co-director of UTS-SUStech Joint Research Centre. The researchers envisage the developed nanoscale optical devices could be simultaneously used for tagging different cellular species. “These devices are also readily applicable for high-security-level anticounterfeiting when different batches of them are blended with inks and can be readily printed on high-value products for authentication.’ Dr Wen said

Source: https://feeds.nanowerk.com/~/639384579/0/nanowerk/agwb~Nanoscopic-barcodes-set-a-new-science-limit.php

Continue Reading

Nano Technology

Freeze like a star! Web exhibition explores the mysteries of the quantum world

Avatar

Published

on










(Nanowerk News) Colder than in outer space, higher pressure than 30 sperm whales on a stamp, and super magnets that could hold two Eiffel Towers: The search for new quantum materials – the materials of the day after tomorrow – is taking place today under extreme conditions.
Yet it is often difficult to understand what the researchers actually do in their high-performance laboratories.
The Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat–Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter has now taken a big step towards popular science communication.
The web exhibition SHOWCASE–Insight into our Research provides information about the goals, current activities, and research achievements of over 250 international cluster researchers – with easy-to-understand texts, catchy illustrations and entertaining videos.
“No less than three exhibitions were opened this year, all explaining our research themes. The positive response inspired us to prepare these topics in a multimedia format and make them accessible on our website. Now you can navigate through our mysterious quantum world from the comfort of your sofa anywhere in the world. This is an enormous advantage, not the least during the coronavirus pandemic,” emphasizes Prof. Matthias Vojta, spokesperson of the Dresden branch of the Cluster of Excellence.
Available in German and English, the web exhibition explains in an easily understandable way the extreme conditions that prevail in the high-performance laboratories, why researchers design quantum materials atom by atom, and what topological quantum physics has to do with hairy donuts.
An outlook on future applications leads from “cold chips” to “QuBits” and quantum computers. For those who want to know more, there are links to background information.
“In Germany we are leaders in the field of topological quantum materials and we play in the top league of our research field worldwide. But we also want to communicate to the general public outside our scientific community how exciting our experiments are, what groundbreaking results we have achieved and what this means for the society as a whole. This is particularly important to us, because we are convinced that quantum technologies will decisively shape the high-tech of the 21st century and lead to new applications,” explains Prof. Ralph Claessen, spokesperson of the Würzburg branch of the Cluster.
Source: Technische Universität Dresden
Share this:
Subscribe to a free copy of one of our daily
Nanowerk Newsletter Email Digests
with a compilation of all of the day’s news.

These articles might interest you as well:

Source: https://feeds.nanowerk.com/~/639374679/0/nanowerk/agwb~Freeze-like-a-star-Web-exhibition-explores-the-mysteries-of-the-quantum-world.php

Continue Reading
Cleantech2 hours ago

Four Corners EV Charging: Utah & Colorado Are Leaving NM & Arizona Behind

Cleantech2 hours ago

Aptera Announces First “Never Charge” Electric Vehicle

Cleantech2 hours ago

Gayam Motor Works & Sokowatch Launch East Africa’s First Commercial Electric Tuk-Tuks

Cleantech3 hours ago

The German Constitution May Protect A Right To Human Driving

Cleantech4 hours ago

2021 Toyota RAV4 Prime Fails Moose Avoidance Test

SaaS5 hours ago

Top 10 SaaStr Videos of the Week: MongoDB, Splash, Slack + Yammer, Gainsight and More!

Cleantech5 hours ago

Supercell Technology From Cadenza Is Centerpiece Of New York Energy Storage Project — CleanTechnica Exclusive (Video)

SaaS5 hours ago

How to Create PPC Campaigns for Real Estate Marketing

Cleantech5 hours ago

Cleantech ETFs Vastly Outperform Dow Jones, Oil & Gas In 2020

Cleantech5 hours ago

ICE Racing Can Still Teach Us Things

Cleantech6 hours ago

California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard Accelerating Transportation Electrification

SaaS6 hours ago

7 Warning Signs You Have Product Flop on Your Hands (and How to Fix It!)

Ecommerce7 hours ago

Amazon Marketing Consulting

Globe NewsWire7 hours ago

McPhy Energy : Déclaration du nombre total des droits de vote et du nombre d’actions au 30 novembre 2020

Cleantech7 hours ago

Breaking News! Oakland & Seattle Ban Natural Gas as Cities Continue to Lead on Electrification

SaaS8 hours ago

Did You Ship At Least 3 Game-Changing Features This Year?

SaaS9 hours ago

When Should You Use Microsites

Globe NewsWire10 hours ago

Dassault Aviation : Roll-out du Falcon 6X

Globe NewsWire10 hours ago

Dassault Aviation: Falcon 6X rollout

Energy11 hours ago

Crescent Point Announces 2021 Budget

Energy12 hours ago

PHNIX dévoile une nouvelle pompe à chaleur pour le chauffage, le refroidissement et l’eau chaude des habitations, destinée au marché européen

Energy12 hours ago

PHNIX stellt neue Wärmepumpe für Hausheizung, Kühlung und Warmwasser für den europäischen Zielmarkt vor

Esports12 hours ago

NiP announce “Path of a Ninja” talent program

Energy12 hours ago

Wilbur-Ellis Agribusiness Acquires Probe Schedule

Energy12 hours ago

High Purity Alumina Market Estimated to Expand at a CAGR of 12.5% over the Forecast Period of 2020 to 2030 – Persistence Market Research

Energy15 hours ago

Gunvor inaugura una nueva línea de crédito de 540 millones de dólares dedicada al biodiésel

Energy15 hours ago

Gunvor Launches New US $540 Million Biodiesel Borrowing Base

Techcrunch16 hours ago

China’s internet regulator takes aim at forced data collection

Blockchain16 hours ago

Amazing Blocks joins startup and innovation hub TechQuartier

Blockchain17 hours ago

Amazing Blocks attended the European Blockchain Convention

Trending