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Jeff Ubben’s ValueAct increases its bet on an unusual environmental play

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Jeffrey Ubben

Source: BusinessWire

Company: Enviva Partners LP (EVA)

  • Business: Enviva is a supplier of utility-grade wood pellets to power generators. The company procures wood fiber and processes it into utility-grade wood pellets and loads the finished wood pellets into railcars, trucks and barges that are transported to deep-water marine terminals, where they are received, stored and loaded onto oceangoing vessels for transport to the company’s principally Northern European customers.
  • Stock Market Value: $1.2 billion ($34.37 per share)

Activist: ValueAct Capital

  • Percentage Ownership: 7.52%
  • Average Cost: $29.03
  • Activist Commentary: The ValueAct Spring Fund was launched in January 2018 with the mission of identifying and investing in companies whose products, services or technology can unlock environmental or social value, which in turn creates a sustainability premium. ValueAct is building a huge network and has accessed experts in industries such as energy, electrification, water, agriculture, food production, particulates, education and human rights. Just like ValueAct’s constructive, patient investment style, the ValueAct Spring Fund will seek to earn the trust of managers, board members and institutional investors. Jeff Ubben serves as the portfolio manager and Eva Zlotnicka serves as vice president. Eva has a pre-existing relationship with ValueAct through their interactions with Morgan Stanley, where she served as a VP and US lead for the Global Sustainability Research Team. At Morgan Stanley, she worked to help address and raise awareness of environmental and social issues both inside and outside of corporations.

What’s Happening:

On February 14, 2020, ValueAct filed a passive 13G reporting a 6.3% position. On June 5, 2020 they converted that 13G filing to an active 13D filing and reported ownership of 7.52%. Enviva is now a core position in the Spring Fund.

Behind the Scenes:

On May 10, 2018, ValueAct first announced that it acquired a $20 million stake in Enviva Partners LP, making the investment through its ESG-focused ValueAct Spring Fund.

Enviva manufacturers wood pellet plants in the southeastern part of the U.S. from tree farm scraps and pulp mill waste. These pellets are sold to power generators in Europe and Japan as they convert coal plants to biomass. This technology reduces the carbon footprint of these plants by roughly 80%, making it a key part of the decarbonization strategy for utilities. By working closely with the independent stewardship organizations, Enviva helps assure that the tree farms are managed responsibly. The extra income the landowner receives from Enviva helps replace lost business from pulp mills, protecting the land from development.

The company’s strategic access to so much forest growth is key to securing a contracted revenue backlog of over $10 billion, with a contract maturity of over 11 years. Enviva has refined its technology to raise the burning temperature of pellets, enabling them to produce more energy. The company has also slashed costs by building facilities close to logging sites where it can collect scraps that sawmills cannot use. Enviva’s targeted return is 15%, with a current yield of 7.5% and a growth in distributions of 8%.

Ken Squire is the founder and president of 13D Monitor, an institutional research service on shareholder activism, and the founder and portfolio Manager of the 13D Activist Fund, a mutual fund that invests in a portfolio of activist 13D investments.

Source: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/13/jeff-ubbens-valueact-increases-its-bet-on-an-unusual-environmental-play.html

Business Insider

The Colonial Pipeline hack finally made the ransomware crisis real for America, and Americans got really mad

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GettyImages 1232824567
Attendants direct cars in gas lines on May 11 in Charlotte, North Carolina, after fears of a shortage surged due to a pipeline hack.

  • Last week ransomware hackers caused the shutdown of a 5,000-mile gas pipeline on the East Coast.
  • Experts say that is the biggest real-world impact of ransomware felt by the general public.
  • Economics – from gas lines to cybersecurity ratings for companies – may help curb ransomware.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Somewhere in Russia, a ransomware gang may have been high-fiving over causing chaos at American gas stations last week, when they suddenly learned the president of the United States said on television that he was rallying governments of the world “so we all move on those criminal enterprises.”

“‘Maybe it’s time we go spend more time with our families,”‘ Allan Liska of the cybersecurity research firm Recorded Future suggests the gang may have realized. The gang claims the US dismantled its operations, researchers at Intel471 report. But as Liska and others point out, they are criminals, and not known for their truth-telling. What we know for sure is that the gang made a hasty retreat from the public eye.

“Our goal is to make money and not creating problems for society,” the Russian crime syndicate said on its website, where it claimed to have shut down operations. Too late. Last week ransomware got real for America, and America got real mad.

The criminals, working with a large criminal syndicate known as DarkSide, managed to do what no ransomware gang before has accomplished: Make ordinary Americans angry about the effects of ransomware, a cybercrime that has paralyzed businesses and stolen their data.

The ransomware crisis has been sweeping the globe for years, but has mostly just failed to capture the interest of the general public. Even ransomware attacks on hospitals fighting COVID-19 did not get the same mass reaction as the pipeline hack, Liska and others say. And a national zeitgeist moment may have rallied the fight to address one of the world’s worst cybercrimes, a host of top experts tell Insider.

“The fallout of this is literally fistfights at gas stations,” Bruce Snell, director of emerging threats and disruptive technologies at NTT Security told Insider. The telecom is hosting an event of the pipeline cyberattack on Tuesday. “What’s really interesting is the way this attack is bridging the gap between the digital and the physical,” Snell said. “People who don’t even know what ransomware is are angry about this.”

Last week’s attack – which paralyzed Colonial’s computer networks and exposed customer data – struck a real nerve. With more than half of US adults as least partly vaccinated, spring in the air, and Memorial Day on the horizon, a claustrophobic nation shut in for a home-bound year was looking forward to finally hitting the open road. Then the hack caused Colonial to turn off the 5,000-mile pipeline carrying 2.5 million barrels of fuel a day – 45% of the East Coast’s supply of diesel, petrol and jet fuel. Gas prices shot up, lines of cars at the pump stretched for miles, scalpers took the opportunity to hoard the available supply, and tempers flared.

It was when he heard radio hosts in his hometown of Washington, DC talk about the cyberattack that Jake Olcott, vice president of government affairs at the cybersecurity firm BitSight, knew that the issue had reached its highest public awareness. “I never thought I would hear sports talk radio guys talking about ransomware,” Olcott told Insider.

It’s about time, some experts believe. Thousands of businesses and roughly 2,400 schools, hospitals, and government offices were victims of ransomware in the US in 2020, a recent industry report from 65 organizations found. The average attack took organizations offline for 21 days and recovery took 287 days on average, according to the report. The average ransom payout at $312,493 in 2020, a 171% jump from the year prior, the security firm Palo Alto Networks found.

Biden alluded to the Colonial attack in a new executive order on cybersecurity last week, and experts say the US government must pressure Russian President Vladimir Putin to stop harboring the crime gangs. Biden said he believes the gang is not government-run, but traditionally the cybercrime syndicates are able to set up shop in Russia, knowing they will not be extradited to prosecuting nations. By providing computer code, communications support, extortion guidance, and negotiating expertise, those collective criminal organizations are able to turn “robbing a liquor store into ‘Ocean’s 11,'” said Liska, the Recorded Future expert. “But with really, really, really ugly people.”

JoshuaMotta CEO of Coalition
Joshua Motta is the CEO of Coalition, a San Francisco cybersecurity startup.

But “there is only so much Biden can do,” says Joshua Motta, the CEO of Coalition, a cybersecurity startup that insures against ransomware and other cybercrimes. Other experts concurred.

“This has to be a clarion call for businesses,” said Snell, of NTT, who believes industry must embrace ratings for cybersecurity – like health codes posted on the walls of restaurants. In his executive order, Biden mentioned the cybersecurity equivalent of Energy Star ratings for appliances, which Snell said he strongly believes would create a new business priority for cybersecurity.

Motta says the wheels are already in motion, and the Colonial hack will speed them up. “The private sector has a big role to play,” the insurance CEO says, and “the markets are responding.” His firm won’t insure companies with faulty security, he says, just as home insurers won’t insure homes without fire sprinklers.

After the sweeping SolarWinds attacks, companies are requiring cybersecurity inspections from their supply-chain partners, says Snell of NTT, which conducts such inspections as part of its business. The Colonial attack will add to that trend, he believes.

Those market forces can do more than government regulation, the executives believe – and may have just needed a high-profile public moment to pick up momentum.

“The criminals have accidentally broken through into people’s actual lives,” Motta says. “Without a doubt, I think this is a symbolic event.”

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/colonial-pipeline-ransomware-america-cybersecurity-biden-coalition-hack-2021-5-1030432627

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A Starbucks worker reveals the average customer order costs more than she makes an hour, as the coffee giant focuses on more expensive, complicated drinks

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Starbucks barista
  • Starbucks is relying on fewer customers who are spending more on their orders.
  • Workers told Insider that customizations with the expectation of fast food delivery is unsustainable.
  • Some workers say the company has not adjusted staffing needs appropriately to deal with the new volume.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

With the US job market heating up, a shift supervisor at an Atlanta Starbucks told Insider she’s leaving for a job with better pay and benefits. The final straw for leaving her job of two years, she said, was realizing how her pay compared to the increasingly pricey drinks Starbucks sells.

“The thing that really radicalized me was that our starting wage ($9) is less than one average customer’s ticket,” she told Insider.

Though pay varies across Starbucks locations, this supervisor’s experience is at the heart of the company’s strategy. The coffee chain relies on fewer customers who spend more on customized drinks. In the second quarter of 2021, US same store sales increased by 9% despite a 10% decline in number of transactions. The growth was driven by a 22% increase in average ticket size as orders grow larger and more complicated. Additions like different milks and sauces can increase that base price of a drink.

Read more: McDonald’s franchisees blame hiring challenges on unemployment benefits and say an ‘inflationary time bomb’ will force them to hike Big Mac prices

Mobile orders and drive-thru orders tend to be larger and more costly than in-store, according to Starbucks earnings, so many of the most complicated orders are coming through these channels. Drive-thru and pick-up mobile orders made up 80% of transactions before the coronavirus pandemic and have increased since then.

The chain continues to add customization options and new, multi-step drinks even as competitors pare down offerings to make drive-thrus more efficient. While drive-thru menu offerings are trending slimmer at most restaurants, some experts don’t expect that from Starbucks. “They have a ton of customization, and that’s not going away. They believe it’s a strength” Mark Kalinowski, founder of Kalinowski Equity Research, told Insider.

In 2020, Starbucks lagged behind coffee competitor Dunkin’ in terms of speed, according to QSR’s annual drive-thru study. While Starbucks is working to make drive-thrus more efficient, it isn’t trying to be the fastest drive-thru around, Kalinowski says. “Customization is much more meaningful for Starbucks,” he says, even if it means slightly longer waits.

Instead, Starbucks is more of a destination where customers spend time and money for a drink made to their exact specifications.

Workers say customization and speed are at odds

Erika, a Starbucks shift supervisor in Ohio, told Insider that as the business has changed to focus on customizations through drive-thru and mobile, the company has not adjusted staffing needs appropriately to deal with the new volume.

“Drinks are becoming increasingly more complicated as they are offered unlimited modifications, and people are still bored from lockdown so they visit us for a sense of normalcy,” she told Insider, explaining that the heavily modified drinks take more staff to make and keep lines moving.

Starbucks did not respond to Insider’s request for comment about customizing orders and the time they might take for workers.

Another supervisor in Pennsylvania told Insider that situation is the same at her location. “Custom drinks from social media like TikTok are also increasing the need for labor. These drinks are getting more and more complicated while the company is pushing for drive-thru times under 40-50 seconds,” she told Insider. These demands create an “impossible standard for partners to uphold” with “a large amount of stress on partners.”

While Erika would like to make those drinks for customers, she says supervisors expect the impossible, with strict limits on wait times in the drive-thru. It isn’t sustainable, she says, and creates a problem because people expect Starbucks to act as a quick service restaurant.”Simplification of our menu and restricting modifications would improve our speed, or set us up for success by labeling us as a custom beverage establishment that prides itself on the limitless modifications” she told Insider.

“We can’t do both. At least not staffed the way we are.”

Do you have a story to share about a retail or restaurant chain? Email this reporter at mmeisenzahl@businessinsider.com.

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Source: https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/starbucks-worker-says-starting-pay-was-less-than-average-order-customizations-drive-thru-2021-5-1030432626

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A Starbucks worker reveals the average customer order costs more than she makes an hour, as the coffee giant focuses on more expensive, complicated drinks

Avatar

Published

on

Starbucks barista
  • Starbucks is relying on fewer customers who are spending more on their orders.
  • Workers told Insider that customizations with the expectation of fast food delivery is unsustainable.
  • Some workers say the company has not adjusted staffing needs appropriately to deal with the new volume.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

With the US job market heating up, a shift supervisor at an Atlanta Starbucks told Insider she’s leaving for a job with better pay and benefits. The final straw for leaving her job of two years, she said, was realizing how her pay compared to the increasingly pricey drinks Starbucks sells.

“The thing that really radicalized me was that our starting wage ($9) is less than one average customer’s ticket,” she told Insider.

Though pay varies across Starbucks locations, this supervisor’s experience is at the heart of the company’s strategy. The coffee chain relies on fewer customers who spend more on customized drinks. In the second quarter of 2021, US same store sales increased by 9% despite a 10% decline in number of transactions. The growth was driven by a 22% increase in average ticket size as orders grow larger and more complicated. Additions like different milks and sauces can increase that base price of a drink.

Read more: McDonald’s franchisees blame hiring challenges on unemployment benefits and say an ‘inflationary time bomb’ will force them to hike Big Mac prices

Mobile orders and drive-thru orders tend to be larger and more costly than in-store, according to Starbucks earnings, so many of the most complicated orders are coming through these channels. Drive-thru and pick-up mobile orders made up 80% of transactions before the coronavirus pandemic and have increased since then.

The chain continues to add customization options and new, multi-step drinks even as competitors pare down offerings to make drive-thrus more efficient. While drive-thru menu offerings are trending slimmer at most restaurants, some experts don’t expect that from Starbucks. “They have a ton of customization, and that’s not going away. They believe it’s a strength” Mark Kalinowski, founder of Kalinowski Equity Research, told Insider.

In 2020, Starbucks lagged behind coffee competitor Dunkin’ in terms of speed, according to QSR’s annual drive-thru study. While Starbucks is working to make drive-thrus more efficient, it isn’t trying to be the fastest drive-thru around, Kalinowski says. “Customization is much more meaningful for Starbucks,” he says, even if it means slightly longer waits.

Instead, Starbucks is more of a destination where customers spend time and money for a drink made to their exact specifications.

Workers say customization and speed are at odds

Erika, a Starbucks shift supervisor in Ohio, told Insider that as the business has changed to focus on customizations through drive-thru and mobile, the company has not adjusted staffing needs appropriately to deal with the new volume.

“Drinks are becoming increasingly more complicated as they are offered unlimited modifications, and people are still bored from lockdown so they visit us for a sense of normalcy,” she told Insider, explaining that the heavily modified drinks take more staff to make and keep lines moving.

Starbucks did not respond to Insider’s request for comment about customizing orders and the time they might take for workers.

Another supervisor in Pennsylvania told Insider that situation is the same at her location. “Custom drinks from social media like TikTok are also increasing the need for labor. These drinks are getting more and more complicated while the company is pushing for drive-thru times under 40-50 seconds,” she told Insider. These demands create an “impossible standard for partners to uphold” with “a large amount of stress on partners.”

While Erika would like to make those drinks for customers, she says supervisors expect the impossible, with strict limits on wait times in the drive-thru. It isn’t sustainable, she says, and creates a problem because people expect Starbucks to act as a quick service restaurant.”Simplification of our menu and restricting modifications would improve our speed, or set us up for success by labeling us as a custom beverage establishment that prides itself on the limitless modifications” she told Insider.

“We can’t do both. At least not staffed the way we are.”

Do you have a story to share about a retail or restaurant chain? Email this reporter at mmeisenzahl@businessinsider.com.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/starbucks-worker-says-starting-pay-was-less-than-average-order-customizations-drive-thru-2021-5-1030432626

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Gaming

Leveling the playing field

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In 2011, a product developer named Fred Davison read an article about inventor Ken Yankelevitz and his QuadControl video game controller for quadriplegics. At the time, Yankelevitz was on the verge of retirement. Davison wasn’t a gamer, but he said his mother, who had the progressive neurodegenerative disease ALS, inspired him to pick up where Yankelevitz was about to leave off.

Launched in 2014, Davison’s QuadStick represents the latest iteration of the Yankelevitz controller — one that has garnered interest across a broad range of industries. 

“The QuadStick’s been the most rewarding thing I’ve ever been involved in,” Davison told TechCrunch. “And I get a lot of feedback as to what it means for [disabled gamers] to be able to be involved in these games.”

Laying the groundwork

Erin Muston-Firsch, an occupational therapist at Craig Hospital in Denver, says adaptive gaming tools like the QuadStick have revolutionized the hospital’s therapy team. 

Six years ago, she devised a rehabilitation solution for a college student who came in with a spinal cord injury. She says he liked playing video games, but as a result of his injury could no longer use his hands. So the rehab regimen incorporated Davison’s invention, which enabled the patient to play World of Warcraft and Destiny. 

QuadStick

Jackson “Pitbull” Reece is a successful Facebook streamer who uses his mouth to operate the QuadStick, as well as the XAC, (the Xbox Adaptive Controller), a controller designed by Microsoft for use by people with disabilities to make user input for video games more accessible. 

Reece lost the use of his legs in a motorcycle accident in 2007 and later, due to an infection, lost the use of his upper body. He says he remembers able-bodied life as one filled with mostly sports video games. He says being a part of the gaming community is an important part of his mental health.

Fortunately there is an atmosphere of collaboration, not competition, around the creation of hardware for gamers within the assistive technology community. 

But while not every major tech company has been proactive about accessibility, after-market devices are available to create customized gaming experiences for disabled gamers.

Enter Microsoft

At its Hackathon in 2015, Microsoft’s Inclusive Lead Bryce Johnson met with disabled veterans’ advocacy group Warfighter Engaged

“We were at the same time developing our views on inclusive design,” Johnson said. Indeed, eight generations of gaming consoles created barriers for disabled gamers.

“Controllers have been optimized around a primary use case that made assumptions,” Johnson said. Indeed, the buttons and triggers of a traditional controller are for able-bodied people with the endurance to operate them. 

Besides Warfighter Engaged, Microsoft worked with AbleGamers (the most recognized charity for gamers with disabilities), Craig Hospital, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation and Special Effect, a U.K.-based charity for disabled young gamers. 

Xbox Adaptive Controller

The finished XAC, released in 2018, is intended for a gamer with limited mobility to seamlessly play with other gamers. One of the details gamers commented on was that the XAC looks like a consumer device, not a medical device.

“We knew that we couldn’t design this product for this community,” Johnson told TechCrunch. “We had to design this product with this community. We believe in ‘nothing about us without us.’ Our principles of inclusive design urge us to include communities from the very beginning.”

Taking on the giants

There were others getting involved. Like many inventions, the creation of the Freedom Wing was a bit of serendipity.

At his booth at an assistive technology (AT) conference, ATMakers‘ Bill Binko showcased a doll named “Ella” using the ATMakers Joystick, a power-chair device. Also in attendance was Steven Spohn, who is part of the brain trust behind AbleGamers.

Spohn saw the Joystick and told Binko he wanted a similar device to work with the XAC. The Freedom Wing was ready within six weeks. It was a matter of manipulating the sensors to control a game controller instead of a chair. This device didn’t require months of R&D and testing because it had already been road tested as a power-chair device. 

ATMakers Freedom Wing 2

Binko said mom-and-pop companies are leading the way in changing the face of accessible gaming technology. Companies like Microsoft and Logitech have only recently found their footing.

ATMakers, QuadStick and other smaller creators, meanwhile, have been busy disrupting the industry. 

“Everybody gets [gaming] and it opens up the ability for people to engage with their community,” Binko said. “Gaming is something that people can wrap their heads around and they can join in.” 

Barriers of entry

As the technology evolves, so do the obstacles to accessibility. These challenges include lack of support teams, security, licensing and VR. 

Binko said managing support teams for these devices with the increase in demand is a new hurdle. More people with the technological skills are needed to join the AT industry to assist with the creation, installation and maintenance of devices. 

Security and licensing is out of the hands of small creators like Davison because of financial and other resources needed to work with different hardware companies. For example, Sony’s licensing enforcement technology has become increasingly complex with each new console generation. 

With Davison’s background in tech, he understands the restrictions to protect proprietary information. “They spend huge amounts of money developing a product and they want to control every aspect of it,” Davison said. “Just makes it tough for the little guy to work with.”

And while PlayStation led the way in button mapping, according to Davison, the security process is stringent. He doesn’t understand how it benefits the console company to prevent people from using whichever controller they want. 

“The cryptography for the PS5 and DualSense controller is uncrackable so far, so adapter devices like the ConsoleTuner Titan Two have to find other weaknesses, like the informal ‘man in the middle’ attack,” Davison said. 

The technique allows devices to utilize older-gen PlayStation controllers as a go-between from the QuadStick to the latest-gen console, so disabled gamers can play the PS5. TechCrunch reached out to Sony’s accessibility division, whose representative said there are no immediate plans for an adaptable PlayStation or controller. However, they stated their department works with advocates and gaming devs to consider accessibility from day one.  

In contrast, Microsoft’s licensing system is more forgiving, especially with the XAC and the ability to use older-generation controllers with newer systems. 

“Compare the PC industry to the Mac,” Davison said. “You can put together a PC system from a dozen different manufacturers, but not for the Mac. One is an open standard and the other is closed.”

A more accessible future

In November, Japanese controller company HORI released an officially licensed accessibility controller for the Nintendo Switch. It’s not available for sale in the United States currently, but there are no region restrictions to purchase one online. This latest development points toward a more accessibility-friendly Nintendo, though the company has yet to fully embrace the technology. 

Nintendo’s accessibility department declined a full interview but sent a statement to TechCrunch. “Nintendo endeavors to provide products and services that can be enjoyed by everyone. Our products offer a range of accessibility features, such as button-mapping, motion controls, a zoom feature, grayscale and inverted colors, haptic and audio feedback, and other innovative gameplay options. In addition, Nintendo’s software and hardware developers continue to evaluate different technologies to expand this accessibility in current and future products.”

The push for more accessible hardware for disabled gamers hasn’t been smooth. Many of these devices were created by small business owners with little capital. In a few cases corporations with a determination for inclusivity at the earliest stages of development became involved. 

Slowly but surely, however, assistive technology is moving forward in ways that can make the experience much more accessible for gamers with disabilities.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/05/15/leveling-the-playing-field/

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