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Is Honda Waking Up?

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Published on July 11th, 2020 | by Zachary Shahan

July 11th, 2020 by Zachary Shahan 


Honda has formed a “comprehensive strategic alliance” with CATL, one of the world’s top three EV battery producers. This is not just a contract for batteries, but a deep and broad partnership.

The two automakers that have been perhaps most disappointing in the electric vehicle era have been the companies best known for leading no hybrid technology, Toyota and Honda. It has been the case in several technology transitions that the companies that led in the previous era were near or at the back of the line in the next one. Generally speaking, it’s hard to accept that your leadership position is fading and you need to reinvent yourself if you want to remain a leader. This new alliance between Honda and CATL could mean that Honda has realized that the 1990s are over and is finally waking up to the reality of 2020. Maybe. Let’s dig in.

Honda e interior

Regarding the breadth of the partnership, the duo write, “This agreement will enable the two companies to begin discussions on a broad range of areas including joint development, stable supply, and the recycling and reuse of batteries.” That implies that Honda may want to be involved in battery chemistry or at least packaging innovation, mineral sourcing/mining, and the full lifecycle of a battery in order to maximize efficient use of resources in order to bring costs down and profit margins up.

There is no exclusivity involved (CATL can still sell batteries to other automakers), but “Honda has acquired CATL shares through CATL’s non-public issuance of stocks” as part of the alliance — approximately 1% of CATL’s shares. “Through the non-public issuance of stocks, CATL will strengthen its battery development and further expand production capacity, etc.”

The EV revolution is occurring far beyond China, and Europe is now actually the hottest region for growth — nearly 8% of new auto sales are EV sales, compared to a 4.3% EV market share in China. However, China was leading earlier, and its regulations made it clear to all automakers that they needed to speed up their electrification efforts. It seems this is one of the prime factors that lit a fire under Honda’s buttocks and got it to start looking for a battery leader to partner with. The first Honda model to use CATL batteries will hit the Chinese market in 2022. Nonetheless, its vision goes beyond China. “This alliance will be further expanded to the global level in the future.” What they mean by “global” is unclear. Europe, because Honda needs to electrify there as well for clear regulator reasons? North America? South America?

Honda’s only genuine foray into 100% electric vehicles up till now has seemingly been the Honda e, a cool, cute electric car aimed at the European market. The problem is that this small “city car” has a range of 220 km (137 mi) before needing to recharge, based on the WLTP rating system. That would have been great 5 years ago, but it’s extremely lame in 2020. It appears Honda desperately needs CATL’s help in order to get competitive on pricing for the specs. (Note that Honda only needs to sell 10,000 electric vehicles a year to comply with European regulations, and that’s all it intends to sell.)

Adding insult to injury, Honda canceled production of the Clarity Electric at the end of 2019 — because demand for the vehicle (called a “compliance car” because it was only developed and sold for markets that required more EVs). The Clarity Electric’s range was a pitiful 143 km (89 miles).

Hachigo Head in Sand

Putting out a statement that is disturbing if its genuine, or deep sarcasm of it’s not, “Takahiro Hachigo, CEO of Honda Motor Company, said at the end of 2019.

“I believe hybrid vehicles will play a critical role. The objective is not electrification, per se, but improving fuel efficiency. And we believe hybrid vehicles are the way to abide by different environmental regulations,” Going on:

 “Are there really customers who truly want them? I’m not so sure because there are lots of issues regarding infrastructure and hardware. I do not believe there will be a dramatic increase in demand for battery vehicles and I believe this situation is true globally. There are different regulations in different countries, and we have to abide by them. So it’s a must to continue r&d. But I don’t believe it will become mainstream anytime soon.”

Now we at least get a positive story about Honda and CATL joining forces. Additionally, it appears that Honda and GM have been moving forward with a potentially major collaboration as well, one centered around new “Ultium” batteries for electric cars.

Honda and GM’s Ultium Place

“[T]he Ultium battery features more aluminum and less cobalt than the batteries GM has used in its previous electric cars such as the Volt and Bolt.” Those batteries will soon be manufactured at a factory jointly owned in Ohio, USA. The Ultium batteries are supposed to initially be produced at a scale of 30 GWh per year, so mark this down as another “gigafactory,” just not a Tesla one.

“In a press release dated April 2, Honda and General Motors announced they will be working together to develop two all new electric vehicles for Honda. They will be built on GM’s global EV platform and powered by Ultium batteries. The exterior and interior of the new EVs will be designed by Honda and the platform will be engineered to support Honda’s driving character.”

That sure makes it look like Honda is so far behind that it needs to use the vehicles from a competing brand in order to produce any EVs worth buying.

I’ll wait till I see something solid with a Honda electric car that goes beyond compliance before getting too excited and concluding Honda is waking up.

At the moment, the Honda Accord and Honda Civic are still top sellers in the United States, despite note having any pollution-killing partners. However, they will be doomed before long if Honda doesn’t find a way to create top-notch electric vehicles that can compete with the top EV models of 2020. They have already been passed up by the Tesla Model 3 in California


 

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Tags: CATL, coronavirus, EV batteries, Honda, Honda e, LG Chem, Ultium batter, Ultium battery


About the Author

Zachary Shahan is tryin’ to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director, chief editor, and CEO. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada, and Curaçao. Zach has long-term investments in Tesla [TSLA] — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in this company and feels like it is a good cleantech company to invest in. But he does not offer (explicitly or implicitly) investment advice of any sort on Tesla or any other company.



Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2020/07/11/is-honda-waking-up/

Cleantech

In Defense Of PHEVs (Probably Part One)

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Published on August 3rd, 2020 | by Jacek Fior

August 3rd, 2020 by Jacek Fior 


Within two weeks in June, I read two articles on CleanTechnica that somehow made me blush a little. The first one openly said the era of plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) must end (something I have said a few times myself, to be honest) and the second one was on SUVs being responsible for growing transport emissions in the EU. The reason I blushed was that a few days before the first of the two articles came out, I had decided to buy (or, to be precise, long-term hire/rent) a PHEV SUV, the Peugeot 3008 Hybrid4.

Isn’t it ironic that after years of preaching about EVs and looking down when asked about my own car (I was driving a diesel Volvo S60), the moment I made the change I received two blows from my brothers in arms, other CleanTechnica writers? Well, here I am, fighting my case since I have nothing else to lose.

My first private unveiling. (Photo courtesy of Peugeot Polska.)

First of all, let’s get it straight from the very beginning – yes, I’d rather have a Tesla Model 3. I still hope my next car will be a Tesla (can’t say Model 3, maybe Model Y or something else Elon cooks up), but you simply can’t beat math and the numbers didn’t add up for me (yet). Having said that, I can now focus on my wonderful new friend, the Peugeot 3008 Plug-In Hybrid.

I think you may all be surprised when I say that the number one reason I have this car today is … the dealer. Many a times have I complained about poor dealer skills in selling EVs and plug-in hybrids, and Adam from Peugeot could also be in this group. What made him different was his openness to learning about EVs, which was why he approached me and the most famous EV pioneer in Poland, Tomek Gać (you may remember him from crazy EV trips in Europe to Macedonia and Sicily, just a few that he has made). Adam wanted to talk with us about electric vehicles.

What a start it was! The next thing I knew, we were test driving the Peugeot e-208 (a cute one I will write about soon) and we started to build a bond. It wasn’t hard to notice I was in need of a new car, and Adam simply worked on my fire to get me to go with the Peugeot 3008 PHEV. Forgive me for this lengthy intro, but I felt this background was necessary to understand the decision, and Adam deserved credit for his excellent work towards selling more EVs in Poland (and that is not easy, trust me).

Adam busy making sure I know what the buttons are for! (Photo courtesy Peugeot Polska.)

Now, back to the car. I’ve had it for three weeks today, and I’m learning to love it. 4 days after I got it, I packed my family of four plus our Labrador dog and we set off to Denmark. We did 3400 km (2112 miles) in total, with about 2500 km (1553 miles) there and back plus 900 km (559 miles) driving around Denmark.

Did I charge on the way? No. Kind of obvious, as the gain of charging for an hour and a half would be about 45–50 km (the onboard charger is 7.3 kW and the battery 13.2 kWh). Spending an hour and a half on the road for 45–50 km out of 1200 km is a bit discouraging. That could be an argument for Daryl Elliott’s argument to get rid of PHEVs. However, PHEVs are not for long-distance electric journeys, are they? They are for going electric to work, the shopping center, the cinema, etc., while also allowing the convenience of no-hassle long-distance trips as needed.

In the 900 km of driving around Denmark, about 50% was pure electric. I charged everywhere I could overnight — my sister’s, my mother’s, one petrol station. Each e-kilometer simply made me happy and it made my kids happy, as they are EV-educated, of course (let alone my wife, who was happy that I was happy). Still, it must be openly admitted: we burnt petrol driving there and back. With four people (not very heavy), my Labrador dog (a little too heavy), and luggage (including Danish salted butter), the average fuel use was 7.3 l per 100 km. Not bad at all, I’d say.

Looks good, doesn’t it? (Photo courtesy of Peugeot Polska.)

The interesting part is happening now — back at home — as I haven’t filled up my tank for 8 days and counting (very unusual for me). So far, 90% of my trips are electric (my record on one charge so far is 56 km), and 100% of my electricity comes from PV panels on my roof. Can that get any better? (I know it could with a Tesla, but I already explained that.)

I honestly can’t imagine having a PHEV and not charging it to drive electric. It’s so much better, smoother, and cleaner. All that we know here at CleanTechnica, while many others don’t — until they experience it. Maybe, then, instead of throwing away the PHEVs, we should just make more effort to teach people how to use them, to show them the benefits, not only for themselves but also globally.

There is hope that good car dealers can do their job and sell more than just a car, also teaching users the value of plug-in hybrids as they get the opportunity. It seems obvious, but it’s not. Even large companies don’t understand PHEVs. (Large rental companies have only “hybrid” under “fuel” options without differentiating silly hybrids from plug-in hybrids.) I believe many users buy PHEVs not fully comprehending their worth, many of them believing in Toyota’s “self-charging” hybrids. (Yikes!) However, if taught about the benefits of driving electric and the ease of charging at home, it is logical many more may charge as much as possible.

As good as it gets — sun energy straight into my plug-in vehicle. (Photo by Marta Fior.)

Pleas don’t get me wrong. My intention is not to defend “my” car and excuse myself. I agree with the arguments Daryl provided and I really didn’t need the UK study to know that many PHEV drivers don’t charge their cars. I have spoken about it for years, sometimes calling it a rotten compromise.

I found myself in this trap, though, when my target family EV was still beyond our reach and I could no longer look in the mirror driving a diesel vehicle. Doing 35,000–40,000 kilometers (21,747–24,855 miles) a year, you are left with very few options.

I promise to be back with more data on our Peugeot 3008 Hybrid and my experiences with it, and you can be sure I will be honest with you and reveal all the pros and cons, even if the truth will be painful (for the user). Till then, let’s give this baby a chance. 
 
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Tags: Peugeot, Peugeot 3008, Peugeot 3008 PHEV, Peugeot 3008 PHEV long-term review, Poland


About the Author

Jacek Fior Jacek is an entrepreneurial type who sees opportunities all around. He runs his own corporate language training company and international translation agency, Better Horizons. One of his many passions, besides card tricks and mixology, is electric cars and their introduction on the market. He is currently working on launching the Polish platform of CleanTechnica — cleantechnica.pl — in the hopes of helping people to understand the revolution we are witnessing. Jacek is also a founding partner of Tesla Shuttle.



Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2020/08/03/in-defense-of-phevs-probably-part-one/

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Our First Trade Show — A Wrapup

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Published on August 3rd, 2020 | by Andrea Bertoli

August 3rd, 2020 by Andrea Bertoli 


On Wednesday, July 29, the CleanTechnica team ventured to where no cleantech news site has gone before — into the world of virtual trade shows!

We hosted our first ever CleanTechnica Virtual Trade Show by featuring some Tesla aftermarket and EV charging gear. This space is growing, and we’re so excited that we had such great companies join us for our first event (and we’re stoked to have had readers join us from around the world). We look forward to hosting many more of these events in the future, so stay tuned!

We had three great companies join us for our inaugural event, and I want to highlight them all here so that if you missed the event you can learn more about them and reach out if that fits your personal or professional EV needs.


EVANNEX is where the Tesla community shops. As the first company to enter the Tesla ecosystem back in 2012, EVANNEX is a longtime partner and friend of CleanTechnica. Father and son team Roger and Matt Pressman started in a garage (literally) making a center console for the Tesla Model S. There was significant demand for their product, and soon a business was born.

They now offer aftermarket parts and accessories for the Tesla Model S, Model X, Model 3, and Model Y. CleanTechnica readers can currently get $10 off any order over $100 when using the discount code cleantechnica during checkout. Get all your Tesla parts and accessories here: evannex.com

NeoCharge has created a really smart home charging solution. Its unique and (recently UL-listed) 220V splitter device plugs into existing 220V outlets, and then allows a 220V outlet to become two 220V outlets. This means you can plug in the dryer and your EV, or plug in two EVs at one time to help make the most of your charging space. Matt Pressman at EVANNEX noted that they’ve been testing it for weeks with two Tesla vehicles they own and love it so much they will over it in their store.

This safe and easy-to-use splitter doesn’t require costly upgrades or installations with an electrician, which means it’s significantly more affordable and easier than any other solution. The Dual-Car Smart Splitter is 6× faster charging than a normal wall outlet, and can add up to 30 miles of range per hour, and it works with all electric vehicles and EV chargers (4 prong, NEMA 14-50). Grab yours (on sale now) at GetNeoCharge.com.

NeoCharge Dual-Car Smart Splitter to charge two EVs at your garage or office.

KIGT is the world’s smallest & “smartest” EV charger. Co-founder Paul Francis has been working and innovating in this space for years. His team makes a smart, stylish EV charger that is sleek and stylish. While selling one of the most popular products in the industry years ago, he realized a pain point in this sector was the cost and usability of traditional charging stations, so he created new smart solutions.

These charging stations are Alexa- and app-compatible and user-friendly. The “Home mini” features “the first ever touchscreen on a home eCharger.” This makes it easy and intuitive to use. The company is rapidly expanding, and I was especially happy to see they are expanding to my home of Hawaii, with 100 installs of commercial and multi-family housing units coming online in 2021.

The KIGT team (left to right): Paul Francis, CEO, Brandon Aparicio, Project Manger and Chemical Engineer, and Jatomis Stevenson, CTO.

Thanks to all those who presented and also those who registered! Follow us on Twitter and sign up for our newsletters to be sure to stay up to date on our events. If you’d like your company to be involved in future trade shows, please contact me, Sales & Partnerships Manager for CleanTechnica, at Andrea@cleantechnica.com.

What’s a Virtual Trade Show, Anyway?

A virtual trade show is a free, live event via Zoom or another such platform that takes the place of an in-person trade show — which costs time, energy, and carbon to attend. In this event, our presenting companies each got a few minutes to explain their offerings to the full audience, and then we divided into Trade Show booths (aka “Zoom breakout rooms”). Attendees then dropped into the different booths for any length of time to learn more about specific products, ask the manufacturers questions, or just have a chat with the founders.

This is a fun, climate-friendly way to attend a cool event, instead of flying across the country (too many emissions) and sharing physical space with a bunch of people (#socialdistancing).

We plan on doing more of these events in the future, so stay tuned! 
 
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Tags: EV charging, EV home charging, EVANNNEX, KIGT, NeoCharge, Tesla Accessories


About the Author

Andrea Bertoli I’m a marketing and sales professional focused on mission-driven businesses, and currently I manage Sales and Partnerships for CleanTechnica. I’m also a journalist, green investor, wellness educator, surfer, and yogi. Find delicious food and wellness stuff on my Instagram @VibrantWellness.



Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2020/08/03/our-first-trade-show-a-wrapup/

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Cleantech

Just How Much Does Tesla Get In Subsidies Anyways?

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August 3rd, 2020 by Johnna Crider 


A common theme Tesla critics have focused on off and on for years regarding Tesla is subsidies, and it’s a popular topic again. The idea from critics is that Tesla is getting billions of dollars of subsidies and that’s why it’s a viable company. Let’s hone in on that thought and see how accurate it really is.

Before getting into that, though, let’s briefly recap exactly what Elon Musk said recently about a US government stimulus package for Americans, since this is what triggered another round of hyperventilation around “Tesla subsidies.”

Many have focused only on the first tweet, and criticisms of it have lacked the important context of the followup tweets and thus been misleading. In his thread, Elon shared his thoughts as to why a bailout wouldn’t benefit the American people. Simply put, giving free money to large corporations in a complicated stimulus package, such as the Republican plan, wouldn’t help you or me much — nor those millions who are facing eviction — while again funneling a ton of money to the richest Americans..

Bernie Sanders and Robert Reich, two of the most notable critics of Elon’s first tweet, actually have the same critique that Elon has. So, the whole controversy is based around miscommunication rather than different opinions on policy. However, they have also tagged on attacks on Tesla for having received government subsidies — subsidies and regulatory credits (which are not subsidies) that, again, Sanders and Reich surely supported.

Twitter user “JPR007” (“007”) dove deep into these waters and I am diving in with him. Let’s see just how Tesla and Elon Musk benefitted from these billions of dollars worth of subsidies and who else also gets them (besides the oil companies).

Subsidies: Tesla vs. The Other Guys

In his thread, 007 included screenshots from the subsidy tracking website goodjobsfirst.org. Here are 007’s key points:

Tesla

Tesla received $0.4 billion of federal loans and bailout support via the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) Loan Program. However, that amount was repaid in full with interest, almost a decade early. The federal loan Tesla received was for $465.5 million and was granted in 2010 — the first recovery year after the 2009 financial crisis. As CleanTechnica reported in May 2013, that was paid back 9 years earlier than it had to be.

While Tesla did receive a lot of aid from taxpayers, Tesla paid us back.

Tesla’s total subsidy value according to the data is $2,441,582,590 ($2.44 billion), across 109 “awards” — 82 federal grants and tax credits as well as 27 state and local awards.

The idea of a subsidy isn’t really a bad thing — its the government’s way of investing in a company. That’s how I see it, and honestly, it’s supposed to be a good thing, not a bad thing.

The idea of an entity putting money into a company, whether it’s via stocks (for example, an index fund buying massive shares in a company) or a state or local government giving tax breaks for a certain amount of time in return for a company keeping a promise (for example, moving there and creating jobs). So, keep that in mind when comparing Tesla and the other automakers below.

The Other Guys

007 also detailed which other automakers received funds from American taxpayers and whether or not they paid us back. They are:

  •  Ford borrowed $5.937 billion under the ATVM Loan Program. Ford still hasn’t paid that back.
    • As of today, Ford has had a total of at least $33,489,841,570 ($33.49 billion) in subsidies awarded.
  • Nissan borrowed $1.448 billion under the ATVM Loan Program and still hasn’t paid us back.
    • Nissan’s total subsidy value is $1,955,199,450 ($1.96 billion).
  • Fisker Automotive borrowed $529 million under the ATVM Loan Program and went bankrupt. We won’t get that money back.
  • GM and Chrysler both went into bankruptcy and had to be rescued under a separate program.
    • GM’s total subsidy value is $50,346,920,000 ($50.35 billion).
    • Fiat-Chrysler’s total subsidy value is $17,599,200,000 ($17.6 billion).

But people are worried about Tesla, which has had the least amount of subsidies according to this tracker?

Who Else Gets High Amounts Of Subsidies?

I wanted to take this to the next level and include oil companies that are currently creating products that pollute the air. As you know, pollution has been linked to higher Covid-19 deaths and also many, many other illnesses. So, let’s take a quick glance at some of the more popular brands you may be familiar with:

  • Exxon Mobil: total subsidy value is $1,015,682,466 ($1.02 billion);
    • Exxon’s federal loans/bailout assistance total: $3,853,988,000 ($3.85 billion).
  • Chevron: total subsidy value is $117,023,474 ($117 million);
    • Chevron’s federal loan and bailout assistance: $2,074,752,000 ($2.07 billion)
  • Shell: total subsidy value is $1,795,683,725 ($1.8 billion);
    • Its federal loans and bailout assistants total $2,686,000 ($2.69 million).

Although these companies were awarded smaller subsidy amounts than Tesla was, keep in mind that these long established companies pollute our planet and thus bodies in ways that cause all kinds of illnesses and tens or hundreds of thousands of premature deaths a year.

Additionally, they have gotten massive bailouts.

Final 2.5¢

The average American may see criticisms of “Tesla subsidies” and automatically assume that Elon Musk is trying to steal their money and is getting away with it because he is a billionaire. This is simply not the case. Every year, we as taxpayers give billions upon billions of dollars out in subsidies to many, many companies. Tesla has benefitted the least from this while providing some of the most valuable products of the century, which will enable us to have a better future. That is why the government has rightfully invested in Tesla over the years — because the return on investment for society is massive.

Others companies that have been established for decades and contribute every day to deadly pollution also receive subsidies. If Tesla was not going to do so, that would put it on lower ground than the competition and make it harder to succeed — which would hurt everyone. 
 
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Tags: Bernie Sanders, Chevron, Chrysler, Elon Musk, ExxonMobil, Fisker, Ford, fossil fuels, GM, legacy automakers, Nissan, policy and politics, Royal Dutch Shell, subsidies, Tesla, Tesla Subsidies


About the Author

Johnna Crider is a Baton Rouge artist, gem, and mineral collector, member of the International Gem Society, and a Tesla shareholder who believes in Elon Musk and Tesla. Elon Musk advised her in 2018 to “Believe in Good.” Tesla is one of many good things to believe in. You can find Johnna on Twitter



Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2020/08/03/tesla-subsidies-how-much/

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