Connect with us

Aerospace

Intelligent systems persevere

Published

on

Intelligent systems persevere

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Alex Wilson, director of aerospace and defence industry solutions for Wind River reveals how intelligent systems persevere, 130 million miles from earth.

When NASA JPL’s Perseverance successfully landed on Mars it marked yet another milestone in humanity’s efforts to discover more about the red planet’s secrets. It also marked a major milestone for Wind River, with Perseverance becoming the fourth rover on Mars to run on VxWorks technology. Perseverance is the ultimate intelligent system, on its mission to look for signs of ancient microbial life, and collect and seal samples of Martian rock and soil.

At 130 million miles from earth, Perseverance has to make decisions and actions mostly on its own. The rover used its ‘brains’ to take photos and determine the best landing site using image comparisons. The rover also has a second internal robotic arm, acting as a ‘lab assistant’ to the external arm, managing the samples and supplying the external arm with new sample tubes.

The conditions necessary for these systems to exist, thrive and react to somewhat unexpected scenarios is what makes Perseverance the perfect example of an intelligent system. It is entirely alien when compared to human capabilities, able to compute, predict, sense and eventually connect from the very farthest edge back to earth. But what Perseverance will teach us is not solely applicable to an interplanetary scenario, it is also applicable to our own industries and environments.

Machines help us see what is possible

Perseverance is the perfect example of machines working in both mission-critical ways and environments to deliver knowledge to advance mankind. It could take over eleven minutes for the signals sent by Perseverance to come back from Mars to earth, meaning Perseverance must largely act autonomously. As Perseverance continues to work and explore new worlds, it should inspire our own new machine economy, focused on near latency-free digital feedback loops to deliver value to limitless use cases across numerous vertical industries.

If Perseverance can operate almost autonomously millions of miles from earth, then imagine what is possible in our own environments, with latency restrictions removed. In fact, our intelligent systems world is set to take off quickly with distributed cloud a key trend that is set to enhance low-latency scenarios. 5G and edge-cloud environments also create the perfect frontier for the realisation of use cases like autonomous vehicles, robots on farms, energy exploration and management in truck trains, on ships and in the air.

In fact, as we approach an increasingly hyper-automated applications-driven world that operates from distributed cloud environments, intelligent systems at the edge become the expected, not the unexpected. These systems will be a pathway to building digital scale and competitiveness for organisations where embedded machines, software, and intelligence work together in near real time to do tasks, pass information or deliver services through the cloud. By enhancing them further, infusing them with AI and ML capabilities, we’ll see organisations truly capitalise on the opportunities of data rich systems and services that anticipate and predict multiple outcomes.

A world of intelligent systems

Perseverance will be as inspirational to the idea of an intelligent systems world as NASA was to the idea of leaving Earth’s orbit. It will be hugely influential in expanding our imaginations for what can be achieved as we enter a world defined by intelligent systems, 5G and edge-cloud architectures. Enterprises should eagerly go beyond their own boundaries and explore software-driven systems that deliver on the dynamic needs of their business, employees and customers. Take for example robotics used in the manufacturing of a car on a smart factory floor within a 5G campus. Through the robot’s own intelligent system and sensors, it can communicate with the server hosted at the network edge in real time to process and analyse data, optimising its performance and predicting potential parts failures or conducting predictive maintenance. This can be crucial both in terms of mitigating costly performance degradations and in maintaining personal safety for those people working in the factory.

Imagine as well, being in the elevator business and using the elevator as a sensor, gathering data on usage and movement patterns of people in the building, and using said data to bolster the building’s security. If sensors can monitor and prevent expensive and highly inconvenient repairs by anticipating possible parts failures and conducting predictive maintenance, then the economics of the elevator business and the nature of conversations about the value of the elevator go far beyond the past 100 years of highly focused expectations. Going even further, imagine connecting that data securely from one elevator to others in the city (or other cities), and being able to look for similar patterns in near real time to enhance knowledge for new product or service design, or even to lower ownership costs for users across tens of thousands of similar elevators.

However, organisations looking to gain a competitive advantage and capitalise on the potential of an intelligent systems first approach cannot expect this to be a natural evolution. Enterprises must be leaders in their own industries, and ready themselves for this new intelligent systems world, making strides to discover the unknown, upskilling developer teams to build flexible, adaptable systems for increasingly connected environments.

NASA has amplified the sense of possibilities for an intelligent systems-first world that we will all benefit from. But enterprises have an opportunity to set a precedent in their own industries. Enterprises must be brave in their own discovery of what is possible. As intelligent edge systems proliferate, enterprises will need to develop systems that are adaptable over their lifecycle to meet requirements as needs evolve. 5G and the edge will realise and host a next generation of use cases which our intelligent systems must be built around to make our visions of the future and what is possible a reality.

www.windriver.com

Tags

Share This Article

Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter

Further Articles

Most recent Articles

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.aero-mag.com/intelligent-systems-persevere/

Aerospace

New Virginia spaceport head seeks to increase launch activity

Published

on

WASHINGTON — The new head of Virginia’s commercial spaceport on Wallops Island says he wants to increase launch activity at the site, while acknowledging that there are limits as to how big it can grow.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D) announced June 10 that Roosevelt “Ted” Mercer Jr., a retired Air Force major general, will be the next chief executive and executive director of the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority, which operates the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at Wallops Island. Mercer will take over Aug. 1 when the current head of the authority, Dale Nash, retires.

“Under his leadership, Virginia is poised to maximize the investments we have made in our world-class spaceport and launch into the future as a leader in space exploration, research and commerce,” Northam said of Mercer in a statement.

Mercer held a variety of space-related roles in his 32 years in the Air Force, including commanding the 30th Space Wing at Vandenberg Air Force Base and serving as deputy director of operations for Air Force Space Command. Mercer retired from the Air Force in 2008 and, in 2016, became director of the Interagency Program Office for the Federal Aviation Administration’s NextGen program to modernize management of the national airspace system.

The authority convened a search committee to select Nash’s successor, which led them to Mercer. “This committee has unanimously selected the best candidate possible to take the helm of Virginia Space,” Jeff Bingham, chairman of the board of the authority, said in a briefing. “Our new CEO and executive director is uniquely qualified to ensure that we deliver on our objectives and work to become increasing active and competitive over the next decade.”

MARS hosts only a few orbital launches a year currently. Northrop Grumman conducts an average of two Antares launches a year from Pad 0-A, sending Cygnus cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station. Neighboring Pad 0-B hosts occasional launches of Northrop Grumman Minotaur rockets, including a Minotaur 1 launch of a National Reconnaissance Office mission scheduled for June 15.

Mercer said at the briefing that growing the spaceport’s launch business was a top priority, second only to looking out for the needs of spaceport personnel. “One of the cleanest ways we can begin to grow this business, without doing much in terms of infrastructure, is simply get aggressive about getting out and bringing more customers to our launch port and to our range,” he said.

A big factor in the future of MARS is Rocket Lab. The company built Launch Complex 2, a launchpad for its Electron rocket, next to Pad 0-A. In March, it announced it would launch its new medium-class Neutron rocket from Wallops, using the existing Pad 0-A. That rocket will also be manufactured at a facility to be built nearby.

Getting both Electron and Neutron flying regularly from MARS could dramatically increase launch activity there. Nash noted at the briefing that Electron is designed to launch from Wallops as frequently as once a month, while Neutron will likely launch six to eight times a year. “Between the Northrop Grumman launches and the Rocket Lab launches, we could be easily doing 20, 25 launches a year within a couple of years,” he predicted. “That is a significant cadence.”

However, the introduction of Electron has been delayed because of issues with NASA’s certification of an autonomous flight termination system that Electron, and eventually all other vehicles, will use at the range. Nash suggested the first Electron launch from Wallops, originally scheduled for 2020, could slip to as late as November because of that certification work.

Mercer said he wants to attract additional launch companies to Wallops. “The opportunity to grow in the next one to five years is extraordinary,” he said, citing interest in small satellites from both companies and government organizations like the Pentagon’s Space Development Agency. “I want MARS to be the place of choice for some of these companies that want to get their satellites into orbit.”

MARS will have to complete with other spaceports for that launch business, in particular Florida’s Cape Canaveral Space Force Station and Kennedy Space Center. While Rocket Lab selected Wallops for its launch vehicles, other companies, including Firefly Aerospace and Relativity Space, are establishing launch operations at Cape Canaveral. KSC recently opened a new launch facility, Launch Complex 48, devoted to small launch vehicles.

Mercer suggested he would be open to building additional launch infrastructure at MARS if there is demand for it. “If we want to continue to expand and grow our business, we have to be able to take a look at how we might take a broader range of booster and booster classes,” he said.

Nash said NASA’s master plan for Wallops includes the ability to add two or three more launchpads, which could potentially accommodate larger launch vehicles than Antares and Neutron. Those would be more expensive to build that the existing pads and other infrastructure that he said the state had invested more than $250 million in building.

Mercer, though, said there are limits to how large MARS could grow. “Will we ever become a Cape Canaveral? Probably not,” he said, because of limits on the infrastructure that can be built there. “We will be limited to some degree, but we want to expand as much as we can and expand the range and size of boosters that we can take as much as we can. That will allow more customers to come to this range.”

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://spacenews.com/new-virginia-spaceport-head-seeks-to-increase-launch-activity/

Continue Reading

Aerospace

The real pioneers of 3D printing

Published

on

The real pioneers of 3D printing

EOS’ Additive Minds Academy was founded in April 2020

EOS key account manager aerospace, Frédéric Verlon explains how its industrial 3D printing technology solutions are helping to shape the future of aerospace manufacturing.

Founded in 1989, EOS says it has mastered the key interaction between lasers and powder materials in additive manufacturing (AM). The company offers everything from a single source, including systems, materials and process parameters – all coordinated to enable reliable high part quality and a decisive competitive edge for its customers.

Q) Firstly, what are the types of trends and demands placed on your company by today’s aerospace customers?

The key requirements are performance, weight reduction and flight safety. This also applies to AM. Performance is achieved when the required part quality can be achieved at the target cost of production. Weight reduction is an area where AM has proved to be very effective, allowing to optimise structures and putting material exactly where it is needed, as well as integrating functions. Flight safety is achieved when demonstrating that the manufacturing quality is reproductible in time, and fully under control. We are investing a lot of effort to deliver solutions which allow those requirements to be achieved.

Q) What are today’s customers looking for in terms of AM related performance solutions?

The aerospace industry has been an early adopter of AM technology and has now reached the level of maturity to actually ramp up serial production of flightworthy parts. Now that we’ve demonstrated that our technology can deliver the required quality, the industry is looking for fully automated production solutions, not only to reduce the manpower costs, but also for the benefit of health and safety. There is also a strong demand for process monitoring and control solutions in a digital factory environment, where all relevant quality assurance data can be recorded and post-processed. We’re in a position to provide solutions to all of the above.

Frédéric Verlon, key account manager aerospace of EOS

The aerospace industry is also looking for processes and solutions for high performance materials, polymers and metals. To meet this demand, we’ve invested heavily in R&D to bring to the market solutions for hard to weld alloys  and composite materials for instance.

Q) How mature is the current additive manufacturing supply chain?

The AM supply chain is continuously maturing. This is achieved thanks to a virtuous collaboration between the end user OEMs, the manufacturing solution suppliers and the AM manufacturing service companies. EOS is dedicated to not only thinking about our customers’ expectations and feedback, but also to consider our customers in our development roadmap activities.

Q) Is AM restricted by the size of parts and the speed in which it can deposit materials?

Of course there are limitations, but we strive to push the boundaries. However, we do this with a strong commitment not to jeopardise the essential: a reproducible high build quality. A typical aircraft includes many large size parts that couldn’t be manufactured additively, but conversely, with the current build size and build speed capacities, we’re far from having explored all the potential aerospace AM applications.

Q) And how much is AM being used to print tools, say for sending parts over the wire to support an aircraft on the ground (AOG)?

An early adopter of AM technology, the aerospace sector is ramping up serial production of flightworthy parts

Over time, we have seen an important use of AM technologies to quickly and efficiently produce tools for the production needs of the factories. This will surely develop into models where tools, being designed centrally, will be built locally where needed in the field. Space agencies are even considering building tools on demand in spacecraft in the near future.

Q) With its ability to print complex, difficult-to-machine parts requiring multiple operations and entire subassemblies, is AM truly the way forward or are cycle times and ‘flight ready’ part qualification an issue?

This is one of the main benefits of AM – and the aerospace industry understood this early on. As a matter of fact, the field of aero-engines and gas turbines is probably the one that has adopted AM production the most, and this is definitely thanks to the AM capability to integrate functions and reduce assembly time.

Q) Bring me up to speed with the latest news regarding your Additive Minds Academy?

The Additive Minds Academy’s mission is to develop innovative learning formats and impart application-oriented knowledge about industrial 3D printing in the shortest possible time. We offer short learning modules, e-Learning and Learning paths. Our first three learning paths are AM Data Preparation Specialist Metal, AM Application Specialist Metal and AM Data Preparation Specialist Polymer. Each learning path consists of e-Learnings, self-study, trainer feedback and practical experience.

An optimised part and data flow is crucial for serial additive manufacturing

The learning paths are designed so that the competence required for a new role in AM can be built up within only four to six weeks. The courses combine online and self-study with practical learning based on case studies. Participants are supervised throughout the course, receive one-on-one feedback, and can get in touch with other learners. At the end of the programme, they take a test to then be certified by the Additive Minds Academy.

Q) What particular aspect has helped your company get through the pandemic?

I see two key points: the ability of our industrial 3D printing technology to enable a distributed and flexible production, and the overall trend of digitalisation/digital work we as a company embraced – both internally and for our customers.

Everyone involved in supply chain manufacturing has had good reason over the last 12 months to think about how to protect their production flows and make them more efficient. When Covid-19 infection rates climbed drastically worldwide at the beginning of 2020, the potential of 3D printing to rapidly manufacture parts was quickly leveraged by many in order to produce medical equipment and machinery. Numerous countries and businesses have turned to local manufacturers and industrial 3D printing to help address the surge in demand for new products such as PPE, ventilators and nasal swabs.

One example for my ‘digitalisation’ point above: Additive Minds Academy was founded in April 2020, when the pandemic had just started. Covid was an accelerator towards digital learning. Last spring we offered our first ‘Home office training package’ which was very well accepted globally. The pandemic has shown that a rethink must happen when it comes to travel for training purposes. Through blended learning formats, online and remote training, the Additive Minds Academy is taking a step towards conserving resources and reducing not only travel times, but also training costs.

Q) Do you think companies should be using this pandemic enforced downtime to effectively ‘reset’ and look at how efficiently they are running their businesses?

Narrowing this question down to the aerospace industry and our technology, I think there are some things which can be and have been done. While aircraft are grounded during the pandemic, 3D printing is being employed for maintenance and cabin interior reconstruction. The halt of aircraft operation has paused the need for much of the flight-hour-driven and flight-cycle-driven maintenance. Nevertheless, a good part of maintenance is calendar-driven, including parking procedures. Where aircraft are, there is maintenance.

EOS’ M 290, an all-rounder for 3D printed metal parts

Also, airlines and maintenance organisations can use AM to develop value selling for those who still fly through new, personalised experiences for passengers, and to enable increased cargo volumes and new cargo delivery mechanisms. Hygiene enablers and smart, locally manufactured parts made with 3D printing technology can be the avenue of success. MROs will benefit from cheaper spare parts, lower part weight and better designs, as cargo operation moves more into the focus.

More generally, the air travel industry is at a turning point of its history. The epidemic has led the world to reconsider the way people travel. This has happened at a time where climate change is acknowledged to be a critical problem. Those two elements will undoubtably lead the aircraft industry to take new paths where AM will play a strong part.

Q) What kind of industry landscape will we be faced with when everything gets back to normal?

A change was already taking place, with distributed production vividly demonstrating what could be achieved through the pandemic. This development will continue in my opinion.

Industrial 3D printing allows for demand-driven production, streamlines processes, and makes the supply chain more robust. Products can be improved or newly created with regards to their complexity, functional integration, or lightweight construction. Combining industrial 3D printing with digital manufacturing structures that link machines and production control software systems in globally dispersed locations, results in new levels of transparency thanks to real-time reporting, flexibility, and performance.

Recent events are leading all manufacturers to realise they may not be as flexible as they realised – allowing 3D printing to shine on the global stage. A technology once seen as only suitable for prototyping is dealing with these challenges head on and leading to evolutions in product designs and manufacturing that simply are not possible with traditional techniques.

Q) Finally, any other thoughts on the future?

Sustainability is becoming increasingly more important across all industries. This is directly interlinked to the benefits of 3D printing and will play a huge role in 2021 and beyond. EOS is convinced that advanced manufacturing can be highly beneficial through its ability to produce locally and on-demand, reduce scrap waste compared to conventional manufacturing, and even potentially cut CO2 emissions.

In the coming years, 3D printing materials will also increasingly be made from renewable sources, such as EOS’ high-performance polyamide 11 plastic which is made from 100% renewable castor beans.

www.eos.info

Tags

Share This Article

Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter

Related Articles

Most recent Articles

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.aero-mag.com/additive-manufacturing-aerospace-11062021/

Continue Reading

Aerospace

The real pioneers of 3D printing

Published

on

The real pioneers of 3D printing

EOS’ Additive Minds Academy was founded in April 2020

EOS key account manager aerospace, Frédéric Verlon explains how its industrial 3D printing technology solutions are helping to shape the future of aerospace manufacturing.

Founded in 1989, EOS says it has mastered the key interaction between lasers and powder materials in additive manufacturing (AM). The company offers everything from a single source, including systems, materials and process parameters – all coordinated to enable reliable high part quality and a decisive competitive edge for its customers.

Q) Firstly, what are the types of trends and demands placed on your company by today’s aerospace customers?

The key requirements are performance, weight reduction and flight safety. This also applies to AM. Performance is achieved when the required part quality can be achieved at the target cost of production. Weight reduction is an area where AM has proved to be very effective, allowing to optimise structures and putting material exactly where it is needed, as well as integrating functions. Flight safety is achieved when demonstrating that the manufacturing quality is reproductible in time, and fully under control. We are investing a lot of effort to deliver solutions which allow those requirements to be achieved.

Q) What are today’s customers looking for in terms of AM related performance solutions?

The aerospace industry has been an early adopter of AM technology and has now reached the level of maturity to actually ramp up serial production of flightworthy parts. Now that we’ve demonstrated that our technology can deliver the required quality, the industry is looking for fully automated production solutions, not only to reduce the manpower costs, but also for the benefit of health and safety. There is also a strong demand for process monitoring and control solutions in a digital factory environment, where all relevant quality assurance data can be recorded and post-processed. We’re in a position to provide solutions to all of the above.

Frédéric Verlon, key account manager aerospace of EOS

The aerospace industry is also looking for processes and solutions for high performance materials, polymers and metals. To meet this demand, we’ve invested heavily in R&D to bring to the market solutions for hard to weld alloys  and composite materials for instance.

Q) How mature is the current additive manufacturing supply chain?

The AM supply chain is continuously maturing. This is achieved thanks to a virtuous collaboration between the end user OEMs, the manufacturing solution suppliers and the AM manufacturing service companies. EOS is dedicated to not only thinking about our customers’ expectations and feedback, but also to consider our customers in our development roadmap activities.

Q) Is AM restricted by the size of parts and the speed in which it can deposit materials?

Of course there are limitations, but we strive to push the boundaries. However, we do this with a strong commitment not to jeopardise the essential: a reproducible high build quality. A typical aircraft includes many large size parts that couldn’t be manufactured additively, but conversely, with the current build size and build speed capacities, we’re far from having explored all the potential aerospace AM applications.

Q) And how much is AM being used to print tools, say for sending parts over the wire to support an aircraft on the ground (AOG)?

An early adopter of AM technology, the aerospace sector is ramping up serial production of flightworthy parts

Over time, we have seen an important use of AM technologies to quickly and efficiently produce tools for the production needs of the factories. This will surely develop into models where tools, being designed centrally, will be built locally where needed in the field. Space agencies are even considering building tools on demand in spacecraft in the near future.

Q) With its ability to print complex, difficult-to-machine parts requiring multiple operations and entire subassemblies, is AM truly the way forward or are cycle times and ‘flight ready’ part qualification an issue?

This is one of the main benefits of AM – and the aerospace industry understood this early on. As a matter of fact, the field of aero-engines and gas turbines is probably the one that has adopted AM production the most, and this is definitely thanks to the AM capability to integrate functions and reduce assembly time.

Q) Bring me up to speed with the latest news regarding your Additive Minds Academy?

The Additive Minds Academy’s mission is to develop innovative learning formats and impart application-oriented knowledge about industrial 3D printing in the shortest possible time. We offer short learning modules, e-Learning and Learning paths. Our first three learning paths are AM Data Preparation Specialist Metal, AM Application Specialist Metal and AM Data Preparation Specialist Polymer. Each learning path consists of e-Learnings, self-study, trainer feedback and practical experience.

An optimised part and data flow is crucial for serial additive manufacturing

The learning paths are designed so that the competence required for a new role in AM can be built up within only four to six weeks. The courses combine online and self-study with practical learning based on case studies. Participants are supervised throughout the course, receive one-on-one feedback, and can get in touch with other learners. At the end of the programme, they take a test to then be certified by the Additive Minds Academy.

Q) What particular aspect has helped your company get through the pandemic?

I see two key points: the ability of our industrial 3D printing technology to enable a distributed and flexible production, and the overall trend of digitalisation/digital work we as a company embraced – both internally and for our customers.

Everyone involved in supply chain manufacturing has had good reason over the last 12 months to think about how to protect their production flows and make them more efficient. When Covid-19 infection rates climbed drastically worldwide at the beginning of 2020, the potential of 3D printing to rapidly manufacture parts was quickly leveraged by many in order to produce medical equipment and machinery. Numerous countries and businesses have turned to local manufacturers and industrial 3D printing to help address the surge in demand for new products such as PPE, ventilators and nasal swabs.

One example for my ‘digitalisation’ point above: Additive Minds Academy was founded in April 2020, when the pandemic had just started. Covid was an accelerator towards digital learning. Last spring we offered our first ‘Home office training package’ which was very well accepted globally. The pandemic has shown that a rethink must happen when it comes to travel for training purposes. Through blended learning formats, online and remote training, the Additive Minds Academy is taking a step towards conserving resources and reducing not only travel times, but also training costs.

Q) Do you think companies should be using this pandemic enforced downtime to effectively ‘reset’ and look at how efficiently they are running their businesses?

Narrowing this question down to the aerospace industry and our technology, I think there are some things which can be and have been done. While aircraft are grounded during the pandemic, 3D printing is being employed for maintenance and cabin interior reconstruction. The halt of aircraft operation has paused the need for much of the flight-hour-driven and flight-cycle-driven maintenance. Nevertheless, a good part of maintenance is calendar-driven, including parking procedures. Where aircraft are, there is maintenance.

EOS’ M 290, an all-rounder for 3D printed metal parts

Also, airlines and maintenance organisations can use AM to develop value selling for those who still fly through new, personalised experiences for passengers, and to enable increased cargo volumes and new cargo delivery mechanisms. Hygiene enablers and smart, locally manufactured parts made with 3D printing technology can be the avenue of success. MROs will benefit from cheaper spare parts, lower part weight and better designs, as cargo operation moves more into the focus.

More generally, the air travel industry is at a turning point of its history. The epidemic has led the world to reconsider the way people travel. This has happened at a time where climate change is acknowledged to be a critical problem. Those two elements will undoubtably lead the aircraft industry to take new paths where AM will play a strong part.

Q) What kind of industry landscape will we be faced with when everything gets back to normal?

A change was already taking place, with distributed production vividly demonstrating what could be achieved through the pandemic. This development will continue in my opinion.

Industrial 3D printing allows for demand-driven production, streamlines processes, and makes the supply chain more robust. Products can be improved or newly created with regards to their complexity, functional integration, or lightweight construction. Combining industrial 3D printing with digital manufacturing structures that link machines and production control software systems in globally dispersed locations, results in new levels of transparency thanks to real-time reporting, flexibility, and performance.

Recent events are leading all manufacturers to realise they may not be as flexible as they realised – allowing 3D printing to shine on the global stage. A technology once seen as only suitable for prototyping is dealing with these challenges head on and leading to evolutions in product designs and manufacturing that simply are not possible with traditional techniques.

Q) Finally, any other thoughts on the future?

Sustainability is becoming increasingly more important across all industries. This is directly interlinked to the benefits of 3D printing and will play a huge role in 2021 and beyond. EOS is convinced that advanced manufacturing can be highly beneficial through its ability to produce locally and on-demand, reduce scrap waste compared to conventional manufacturing, and even potentially cut CO2 emissions.

In the coming years, 3D printing materials will also increasingly be made from renewable sources, such as EOS’ high-performance polyamide 11 plastic which is made from 100% renewable castor beans.

www.eos.info

Tags

Share This Article

Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter

Related Articles

Most recent Articles

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.aero-mag.com/additive-manufacturing-aerospace-11062021/

Continue Reading

Aerospace

Pegasus rocket successful in responsive launch demonstration

Published

on

Northrop Grumman’s Pegasus XL rocket is mated to its L-1011 carrier aircraft before the TacRL-2 launch. Credit: U.S. Space Force

A Northrop Grumman Pegasus rocket dropped from the belly of a carrier jet over the Pacific Ocean early Sunday and streaked into orbit with a small U.S. military space surveillance satellite named Odyssey, completing a successful rapid launch exercise in partnership with a secretive new Space Force special projects unit.

The mission’s goal was to demonstrate how the military can develop and launch satellites on faster timescales. The small spacecraft, which a Space Force spokesperson said is named Odyssey, was buttoned up inside the nose cone of a Pegasus XL rocket.

The mission, known as TacRL-2, was part of the Space Force’s “Tactically Responsive Launch” program.

Mounted on the belly of an L-1011 carrier aircraft, the 53,000-pound (24-metric ton) Pegasus XL rocket departed Vandenberg Space Force Base on California’s Central Coast about an hour before launch.

The L-1011 aircraft, named “Stargazer,” flew to the Pegasus drop zone about 150 miles (250 kilometers) off the California coast and lined up on the launch trajectory heading south. Two pilots, a flight engineer, and two launch console operators ensured all systems were “go” for release of the Pegasus.

The flight crew commanded release of the 55-foot-long (17-meter) at 4:11 a.m. EDT (1:11 a.m. PDT; 0811 GMT) as the L-1011 flew at an altitude of 39,000 feet (11,900 meters).

After a five-second free fall, the Pegasus ignited its solid-fueled first stage Orion 50S XL motor to begin the climb into space.

The first stage, fitted with a wing and steering fins, generated more than 160,000 pounds of thrust and fired more than a minute before burning out. The Pegasus then jettisoned its first stage and fired its Orion 50 XL and Orion 38 second and third stage motors to reach orbit with the Odyssey satellite.

Northrop Grumman and the Space Force did not provide a live webcast of the mission.

A statement released by Space Launch Delta 30, formerly the 30th Space Wing, at Vandenberg Space Force Base less than an hour after launch confirmed the mission was successful.

The Space Force established the Tactically Responsive Launch Program to demonstrate the military could “call up” a launch provider and deploy a small satellite into orbit within 21 days.

“Our mission partners and Delta 30 team demonstrated the Space Force tactical response capability to launch small satellite payloads within three weeks,” said Col. Robert Long, commander of Space Launch Delta 30, in a statement. “It takes a resilient team providing agile services and responsiveness to our launch customers for mission success. I want to thank our launch partners and our Delta 30 team for their efforts providing space access for this important tactical response demonstration.”

Military officials have released few details about the Odyssey satellite.

Maj. Nick Mercurio, a Space Force spokesperson, said the payload is a “space domain awareness technology demonstration satellite.” Space domain awareness is a field that encompasses the detection, tracking, and characterization of satellites and debris in orbit.

Officials did not reveal the mission’s target orbit, but airspace warning notices suggested the Pegasus XL rocket likely headed for a sun-synchronous orbit with an inclination of about 98 degrees.

The Odyssey spacecraft was built by a new organization called “Space Safari,” modeled after the Air Force’s secretive “Big Safari” program that modifies aircraft for special missions, according to Gen. Jay Raymond, the Space Force’s chief of space operations.

“The thing that concerns me is our ability to go fast, so everything that we’re doing in the Space Force is designed to allow us to move at speed,” Raymond said Thursday in a virtual discussion hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations. “So about a year ago, I challenged our acquisition organization to develop a capability in tactical timelines, integrated it onto a launch vehicle and launch it, and let’s see how fast we can do it.

“So we stood up an organization called Space Safari, modeled kind of after what the Air Force has done with their Big Safari program, and in less than a year, they took satellite components off the self, married it up with a satellite bus that was off the shelf, put it together, and it’s a space domain awareness satellite.”

Raymond said it takes about five years to build a GPS navigation satellite.

“That’s not good enough,” he said.

Building and launching a spacecraft in less than a year could pave the way for the Space Force to quickly deploy a satellite to respond to an emerging threat, or to replace a critical satellite in wartime.

“This is a first experiment, and I’m proud of the team,” Raymond said. “It was less than year from when I gave them the challenge to a launch.”

Once the satellite was built, the Space Force kept in storage until May, when officials called it up for launch.

“We kind of had it on the shelf. We just gave them a 21 day call-up, saying get ready to launch in 21 days,” Raymond said

The Space Force awarded Northrop Grumman a $28.1 million contract for the TacRL-2 launch last July. The Defense Department awarded the task order through the Orbital Services Program-4 contract, which covers launch services for small and medium-size military satellites through 2028.

A Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket inside its hangar at Vandenberg Space Force Base, California. Credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

Northrop Grumman had the Pegasus XL rocket for the TacRL-2 mission in storage. It was one of two Pegasus rockets manufactured for Stratolaunch, a company founded by the late billionaire Paul Allen. Stratolaunch developed the largest airplane ever built, and purchased two Pegasus rockets to launch from the giant aircraft, then planned to work on its own launch vehicle.

But Stratolaunch’s progress slowed after Allen’s death in 2018, and the company abandoned plans to launch Pegasus rockets. Instead, Stratolaunch said last year it is working on a hypersonic test vehicle.

Stratolaunch’s airplane successfully flew for the first time in 2019, and completed a second test flight in April.

After Stratolaunch’s plans changed, Northrop Grumman reacquired the near-complete Pegasus rockets from Stratolaunch to offer to other customers.

Kurt Eberly, director of Northrop Grumman’s launch vehicles division, said the Pegasus team and the Space Force worked out how to execute the TacRL-2 mission in the months leading up to the call-up May 22, including agreements with the Western Range at Vandenberg on flight safety parameters. But some specifics, such as the target orbit and trajectory, were not known to the Pegasus team until 21 days ago.

“I would say it was very successful,” he said in an interview. “What we just did with the space vehicle team is really hard. We got the call-up 21 days ago on a Saturday evening. Our team just swung into action. In that call-up, we got direction on the trajectory and where to launch to, and some other particulars. So our team had to adjust to all that.”

The Odyssey satellite arrived at Vandenberg within the last three weeks. Technicians encapsulated the spacecraft inside the Pegasus payload fairing before mating it to the rocket.

Ground teams at Vandenberg connected the Pegasus XL rocket to the L-1011 carrier aircraft Wednesday.

Developed commercially by Orbital Sciences, now part of Northrop Grumman, the Pegasus rocket flew its 45th satellite delivery mission. Since the rocket’s debut in 1990, Pegasus missions have been staged from Vandenberg, Edwards Air Force Base, Cape Canaveral, Wallops Island in Virginia, Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific Ocean, and the Canary Islands.

The most recent Pegasus launch staged from Vandenberg was in 2013.

“It’s the first time in eight years we’ve had a Pegasus launch from here on the Western Range, so that’s exciting to do something we don’t get to do very often,” said Lt. Col. Jeremy Hromsco, commander of the 30th Operational Support Squadron at Vandenberg.

Despite the growth of small satellite operators, the Pegasus rocket has only launched three times since 2013 amid growing competition from other launch companies like SpaceX. Other launch providers in the small satellite sector, such as Rocket Lab and Virgin Orbit, are also cutting into the market once served by the Pegasus rocket.

NASA paid $56.3 million to launch a research satellite on the previous Pegasus rocket flight before TacRL-2.

That mission was delayed more than two years due to technical problems with the Pegasus. NASA decided in 2019 to launch a future scientific satellite aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, a much larger launcher than the Pegasus.

The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer, or IXPE, was originally designed to launch on a Pegasus rocket. SpaceX’s Falcon 9 is vastly oversized for the IXPE satellite, but it has the ability to launch the small payload into a unique equatorial orbit from Cape Canaveral.

And SpaceX can do the launch for $50.3 million, undercutting the previous publicly-available price for a Pegasus. The $28 million contract for the TacRL-2 mission is half the price NASA paid for the most recent Pegasus mission in 2019.

Eberly said the Pegasus rocket, designed by Orbital Sciences in the 1980s as the first privately-developed satellite launcher, still has a role to play in the launch industry.

“Solid rocket motor propulsion is maybe a little more expensive than some of the low-priced new entrants that we see come along,” he said. “We understand that.”

The benefit of solid-fueled launchers, according to Eberly, is they are inherently responsive.

“They are able to be stored for many, many years, and then are ready to launch at a moment’s notice,” Eberly said. “Solid rocket motor technology can enable very short call-up times and responsiveness. What it requires is to get all the work done up front, and get ready, and get the plan done.’

Northrop Grumman has one more Pegasus XL rocket in the hangar, and could build more. So far, the Pegasus doesn’t have a customer beyond Sunday’s TacRL-2 mission.

The Space Force issued a request for proposals earlier this year for two additional tactically responsive launch missions — TacRL-3 and 4 — for flights in 2022 and 2023.

The military in 2019 selected Aevum, Firefly, Northrop Grumman, Rocket Lab, SpaceX, United Launch Alliance, VOX Space, and X-Bow as eligible to compete for OSP-4 missions, including TacRL-3 and 4.

The ground-launched Minotaur rocket family, derived from decommissioned solid-fueled military missile stages, and the air-launched Pegasus rocket are Northrop Grumman’s offerings under the OSP-4 contract.

“If there is a need to shorten up these call-up times, then solids could have a place to serve in that role,” he said. “In addition to the vehicles launched from the ground, an air-launched solid then gives you flexibility in the basing and the drop point, and allowing you to get to different orbits more quickly than you could get to if you had to launch from the ground at a fixed launch point.

“Maybe there’s a role there (for Pegasus),” Eberly said before Sunday’s launch. “So we’re going to do our best job here on TacRL-2 , and put our best foot forward … And then after the mission, we’ll see what comes out of it.”

Email the author.

Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/13/pegasus-rocket-successful-in-responsive-launch-demonstration/

Continue Reading
Esports4 days ago

Genshin Impact Echoing Conch Locations Guide

Esports4 days ago

MLB The Show 21 Kitchen Sink 2 Pack: Base Round Revealed

Aviation3 days ago

The Story Of The Boeing 777 Family

zephyrnet4 days ago

7th Global Blockchain Congress by Agora Group & TDeFi on June 21st and 22nd, 2021, Dubai.

Esports4 days ago

Free boxes and skins up for grabs in Brawl Stars to celebrate one-year anniversary of China release

Blockchain4 days ago

Woonkly will be the official Title Sponsor of the 7th edition Global Blockchain Congress organized by Agora Group in Dubai

Crowdfunding3 days ago

April/May 2021 Top Campaigns

Big Data4 days ago

.NET DEVELOPMENT

Blockchain4 days ago

Death Cross is Appearing Over Bitcoin Price Chart

Blockchain4 days ago

Bitcoin (BTC) Officially a Legal Tender in El Salvador

Blockchain3 days ago

Crypto Fund Manager Says Bitcoin ETFs to be Approved By 2022

Crowdfunding4 days ago

US Fintech Broadridge Partners with Amazon Web Services to Expand Private Market Hub, Leveraging DLT

Big Data4 days ago

China arrests over 1,100 suspects in crackdown on crypto-related money laundering

Cleantech4 days ago

TC Energy Cancels Keystone XL Pipeline

Energy2 days ago

Industrial robots market in the automotive industry | $ 3.97 billion growth expected during 2021-2025 | 17000+ Technavio Research Reports

Gaming4 days ago

TrustDice Review: Features & Promotions

Cyber Security2 days ago

Data Breach that Impacted Both Audi of America and Volkswagen of America

Esports3 days ago

Every new Passive Power in Legends of Runeterra Lab of Legends 2.9.0

Fintech3 days ago

PayPal launches PayPal Rewards Card in Australia

Energy2 days ago

Daiki Axis Co., Ltd. (4245, First Section, Tokyo Stock Exchange) Overview of Operating Performance for the First Three Months Ended March 31, 2021

Trending