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In an aviation first, Boeing drone refuels another aircraft in mid-air

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For the first time ever, an un-crewed aircraft has successfully refuelled another aircraft while both planes were in flight. In the test, Boeing’s MQ-25 T1 aerial tanker drone transferred jet fuel to a US Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet.

Codenamed the Stingray by the Navy, the MQ-25 T1 was developed and built at Boeing’s facilities in St. Louis, Missouri, after the aerospace company won a US$805 million US Navy contract. The prototype drone made its first autonomous flight at the MidAmerica St. Louis Airport in 2019, although no refuelling was performed at that time.

Such was not the case on June 4th of this year, however, when the autonomously flying MQ-25 refuelled a piloted F/A-18 Super Hornet in mid-air. The fighter pilot started by flying in close formation below and behind the drone, at which point the MQ-25 released and extended its fuel-delivery drogue – this is essentially a funnel-like receptacle on the end of a long hose.

The pilot then moved in so that the drogue was able to couple with the F/A-18’s nose-mounted fuel probe, at which point jet fuel was transferred from the MQ-25 to the Super Hornet. According to Boeing, both aircraft were flying at “operationally relevant speeds and altitudes.”

The refuelling exercise came after 25 prior test flights of the MQ-25 T1
The refuelling exercise came after 25 prior test flights of the MQ-25 T1

Kevin Flynn

Ultimately, plans call for Stingray tanker drones to operate off of aircraft carriers, taking to the air to refuel passing F/A-18 Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers and F-35C Lightning II aircraft. That task is currently performed by piloted F/A-18s, which have to be removed from combat duty in order to do so.

“This history-making event is a credit to our joint Boeing and Navy team that is all-in on delivering MQ-25’s critical aerial refuelling capability to the fleet as soon as possible,” says Leanne Caret, president and CEO of Boeing Defense, Space & Security.

The MQ-25 T1 is now due to be shipped to Norfolk, Virginia, where it will the subject of aircraft carrier deck trials later this year.

You can watch the refuelling exercise for yourself, in the video below.

Boeing MQ-25 Becomes First Unmanned Aircraft to Refuel Another Aircraft

Source: Boeing

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Source: https://newatlas.com/drones/boeing-mq-25-drone-refuels-another-aircraft/

NEWATLAS

Samsung’s first 6G prototype demo taps into terahertz frequencies

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It may feel like 5G networks are only just finding their feet and becoming mainstream, but the march of technology rarely rests. The next iteration, 6G, is already in the works, and Samsung has now demonstrated its first 6G prototype 6G system in an over-the-air test, using terahertz (THz) frequencies.

As you’d expect, the main advantage of 6G is faster data rates and lower latencies. The peak data rate is expected to eventually be up to 50 times faster than 5G, pushing it into the range of terabits per second. Latency, meanwhile, is expected to drop to just one-tenth that of 5G, and together these advances should help the tech transmit much more data-intensive content, such as 8K resolution, VR and holographic video.

Currently, 5G communications operate at frequencies up to about 40 GHz, but 6G would push that beyond 100 GHz, tapping into the as-yet-unutilized THz spectrum. The new tech would also give a boost to bandwidth too, which for 5G tops out at around 400 MHz.

For the new test, researchers at Samsung and the University of California, Santa Barbara demonstrated a system with 140 GHz frequency and a bandwidth of 2 GHz. In doing so, they managed to transmit data at 6.2 Gbps over a distance of 15 m (49 ft).

That’s a decent step up from 5G’s speed record of 5.23 Gbps, and even that was with the help of some 4G frequencies in a mostly experimental setup. But still, it’s far short of what 6G could eventually be capable of – data transfer rates of up to 1 Tbps, which is 1,000 Gbps.

The different components of Samsung's new 6G prototype: radio frequency circuits (left), the phased-array module (center), and the antenna array (right)
The different components of Samsung’s new 6G prototype: radio frequency circuits (left), the phased-array module (center), and the antenna array (right)

Samsung

The system consists of a phased array transmitter with 16 channels, receiver modules, and a baseband unit that processes signals and helps direct the beam towards the receiver.

The new test may sound exciting, but don’t throw away your fancy new 5G phone just yet – 6G isn’t expected to be commercially available until about 2030.

The team demonstrated the new 6G device at the IEEE International Conference on Communications 2021.

Source: Samsung

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Source: https://newatlas.com/telecommunications/samsung-6g-prototype-terahertz/

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NEWATLAS

Samsung’s first 6G prototype demo taps into terahertz frequencies

Published

on

It may feel like 5G networks are only just finding their feet and becoming mainstream, but the march of technology rarely rests. The next iteration, 6G, is already in the works, and Samsung has now demonstrated its first 6G prototype 6G system in an over-the-air test, using terahertz (THz) frequencies.

As you’d expect, the main advantage of 6G is faster data rates and lower latencies. The peak data rate is expected to eventually be up to 50 times faster than 5G, pushing it into the range of terabits per second. Latency, meanwhile, is expected to drop to just one-tenth that of 5G, and together these advances should help the tech transmit much more data-intensive content, such as 8K resolution, VR and holographic video.

Currently, 5G communications operate at frequencies up to about 40 GHz, but 6G would push that beyond 100 GHz, tapping into the as-yet-unutilized THz spectrum. The new tech would also give a boost to bandwidth too, which for 5G tops out at around 400 MHz.

For the new test, researchers at Samsung and the University of California, Santa Barbara demonstrated a system with 140 GHz frequency and a bandwidth of 2 GHz. In doing so, they managed to transmit data at 6.2 Gbps over a distance of 15 m (49 ft).

That’s a decent step up from 5G’s speed record of 5.23 Gbps, and even that was with the help of some 4G frequencies in a mostly experimental setup. But still, it’s far short of what 6G could eventually be capable of – data transfer rates of up to 1 Tbps, which is 1,000 Gbps.

The different components of Samsung's new 6G prototype: radio frequency circuits (left), the phased-array module (center), and the antenna array (right)
The different components of Samsung’s new 6G prototype: radio frequency circuits (left), the phased-array module (center), and the antenna array (right)

Samsung

The system consists of a phased array transmitter with 16 channels, receiver modules, and a baseband unit that processes signals and helps direct the beam towards the receiver.

The new test may sound exciting, but don’t throw away your fancy new 5G phone just yet – 6G isn’t expected to be commercially available until about 2030.

The team demonstrated the new 6G device at the IEEE International Conference on Communications 2021.

Source: Samsung

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Source: https://newatlas.com/telecommunications/samsung-6g-prototype-terahertz/

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NEWATLAS

Samsung’s first 6G prototype demo taps into terahertz frequencies

Published

on

It may feel like 5G networks are only just finding their feet and becoming mainstream, but the march of technology rarely rests. The next iteration, 6G, is already in the works, and Samsung has now demonstrated its first 6G prototype 6G system in an over-the-air test, using terahertz (THz) frequencies.

As you’d expect, the main advantage of 6G is faster data rates and lower latencies. The peak data rate is expected to eventually be up to 50 times faster than 5G, pushing it into the range of terabits per second. Latency, meanwhile, is expected to drop to just one-tenth that of 5G, and together these advances should help the tech transmit much more data-intensive content, such as 8K resolution, VR and holographic video.

Currently, 5G communications operate at frequencies up to about 40 GHz, but 6G would push that beyond 100 GHz, tapping into the as-yet-unutilized THz spectrum. The new tech would also give a boost to bandwidth too, which for 5G tops out at around 400 MHz.

For the new test, researchers at Samsung and the University of California, Santa Barbara demonstrated a system with 140 GHz frequency and a bandwidth of 2 GHz. In doing so, they managed to transmit data at 6.2 Gbps over a distance of 15 m (49 ft).

That’s a decent step up from 5G’s speed record of 5.23 Gbps, and even that was with the help of some 4G frequencies in a mostly experimental setup. But still, it’s far short of what 6G could eventually be capable of – data transfer rates of up to 1 Tbps, which is 1,000 Gbps.

The different components of Samsung's new 6G prototype: radio frequency circuits (left), the phased-array module (center), and the antenna array (right)
The different components of Samsung’s new 6G prototype: radio frequency circuits (left), the phased-array module (center), and the antenna array (right)

Samsung

The system consists of a phased array transmitter with 16 channels, receiver modules, and a baseband unit that processes signals and helps direct the beam towards the receiver.

The new test may sound exciting, but don’t throw away your fancy new 5G phone just yet – 6G isn’t expected to be commercially available until about 2030.

The team demonstrated the new 6G device at the IEEE International Conference on Communications 2021.

Source: Samsung

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Source: https://newatlas.com/telecommunications/samsung-6g-prototype-terahertz/

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NEWATLAS

FedEx eyes a future of automated delivery through partnership with Nuro

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Over the past few years, Nuro has been taking some important steps toward a future of autonomous delivery through partnerships with some big names, and it’s just landed what might be its biggest fish yet. The startup has entered an agreement with logistics giant FedEx, which has committed to using the startup’s autonomous delivery vehicles in the long-term and at a “large scale.”

Since starting grocery delivery trials in Arizona with supermarket retailer Kroger back in 2018, Nuro has gone on to conduct similar trials with Domino’s, Walmart and CVS. In a significant milestone for the industry, it also recently earned the first ever autonomous vehicle exemption from the US Department of Transport for its R2 pod, which it began testing on the streets of Houston last year.

FedEx, too, has dipped its toes in the autonomous delivery pond. In 2019 it unveiled what it called the SameDay Bot, a prototype battery-electric delivery pod that rolls down sidewalks and roadsides to complete same-day, last-mile deliveries.

Nuro's autonomous R2 pod
Nuro’s autonomous R2 pod

Nuro

FedEx will task Nuro’s vehicles with a similar responsibility, adding them to its existing fleet of 200,000 vehicles and using them to carry out last-mile deliveries. The pair have already begun testing in Houston, and will soon begin to incorporate Nuro’s delivery bots in those tests and scale up from there, targeting specific use cases and markets.

Beyond that, the details are rather scarce around what vehicles will be used, and when FedEx customers might expect a Nuro pod to drop a package at the door. Nuro does expect its technology to make FedEx’s operations more efficient, however, increasing its capacity and opening up new methods of delivery.

Source: Nuro

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Source: https://newatlas.com/automotive/fedex-automated-delivery-partnership-nuro/

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