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How Vistara Is Helping Communities Impacted By COVID-19

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India’s second wave has hit millions of vulnerable citizens, both medically and financially. During this crisis, Vistara has stepped up to distribute essential aid to families across the country. Let’s find out more about this initiative.

Vistara A321neo
Vistara first began its initiative in April 2020, after India’s national lockdown. Photo: Vistara

Focus

As India’s second wave hit, Vistara opted to go beyond flying medical personnel and cargo and engage in direct aid to the community. This came in the form of the ‘Vistara Wellness Initiative,’ where the airline distributed kits filled with essential supplies like dry rations of food and sanitation essentials.

The airline disturbed over 1,000 of these kits during the second wave alone to vulnerable families across the country. The initiative went beyond the traditional hubs of New Delhi, Mumbai, Ahemdabad to smaller cities like Dibrugarh, Leh, Port Blair (Andaman Islands), and many more.

Vistara Staff Distributing Wellness Kits
Vistara’s kits were given to communities across the country worst-hit by the pandemic. Photo: Vistara

This was the second phase of the wellness initiative. The first phase lasted from April to September 2020, during India’s national lockdown and subsequent months. With the second phase finishing this week, Vistara has distributed almost 150,000 wellness essentials to over 18,000 people since last year.

Essential

In addition to its direct aid, Vistara was one of the first airlines to begin offering free tickets to medical personnel flying during the second wave. This extended to all doctors and nurses and included a return flight once their work was over.

Vistara A321neo
Vistara has been flying medical personnel and goods across the country since April. Photo: Vistara

Moreover, as the second wave resulted in shortages of critical goods like oxygen and medicines, the airline also began transporting these goods for free, wherever possible. Both of these initiatives have drawn praise from the community and government alike. It also highlights the important role civilian aviation plays in the supply chain.

Operations hit

Indian aviation is currently still struggling with the effect of the latest COVID-19 wave. Passenger numbers remain significantly lower than February 2021 levels, which was only 80% of the pre-pandemic ones to begin with.

However, there is some good news on the horizon. The end of May saw passenger numbers rise for the first time in weeks, reaching almost 71,000 daily travelers. While this is far away from 311,000 at the start of March, it is finally a step in the right direction. As cases dip below 100,000 for the first time in months, passenger traffic could begin recovering again.

Vistara Boeing 787 Getty
Vistara’s international plans have been significantly set back by the pandemic. Photo: Getty Images

For Vistara, the easing of cases will be good news. The airline does not have a major domestic presence currently, with the current share at roughly 5-6%. Instead, the airline has been focusing its efforts on international operations instead. Using its fleet of 787-9s, the carrier has been flying to London, Frankfurt and will begin flights to Tokyo next week.

As cases decrease, countries could slowly begin reopening their borders to India, boosting traffic once again. For now, the airline is waiting and watching for a future recovery.

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/vistara-covid-19-aid/

Aerospace

Delivering economic and societal value

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Delivering economic and societal value

David Coleal, CEO of Incora

David Coleal, CEO of Incora, discusses how innovation, disruption and stewardship can come from any part of the aerospace supply chain.

If necessity is the mother of invention, perhaps disruption assumes a paternal role. Certainly, the Covid-19 pandemic disrupted aerospace and other industries with a once-in-a-century, ‘black swan’ event. Yet, while many people focus on the chilling effect of depressed international airline travel, other parts of our industry – from business aviation to defence to space – paint a more optimistic picture. Change, often evolutionary and occasionally revolutionary, has helped make aerospace so adaptable and resilient.

And while it may be tempting to look to external forces as preeminent catalysts for change, the reality is any organisation can play a key role in sustainably rebuilding, not merely maximising profits. Consider the role of distributors and supply chain solutions providers, such as the one I am proud to lead.

From a business perspective, think about the positive effects on a company that can now benefit from lower price without balance sheet impact, or just-in-time parts availability without carrying excess inventory. Operating costs are lower, and precious capital is preserved for R&D, new tooling or technology investment.  However, it is the human and societal elements that are perhaps the most overlooked in our supply chain-driven industry.

Start with sustainability. It seems like ancient history, but less than two years ago our industry was on the defensive from those who used flight-shaming tactics to obscure the significant progress made on lowering the carbon footprint. Those criticisms will resume, and we can benefit on expanding the conversation beyond improvements like increased lightweight structures, improved engine performance and sustainable aircraft fuels to include the entire supply chain. Incora provides an optimised, end-to-end supply chain system that makes its own sustainable contributions through increased efficiency, reduced waste, just-in-time delivery, kitting efficiencies and lifecycle chemical management.

Then consider diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), which are paramount for any company with aspirations to compete globally. Fostering and maintaining an environment that makes everyone feel welcome and appreciated is just as valuable as any part or process. As a supply chain solutions provider, we are geographically, ethnically and socially diverse by nature to support our worldwide customer base, but more work remains. We recently appointed a new chief people and diversity officer at Incora and are starting a diversity council to further elevate this, putting talent at the heart of our value proposition.

Related to DEI is another familiar acronym: STEM. Our industry’s structural human capital challenge was evident long before the pandemic that sparked workforce reductions and accelerated the departure of skilled labour and professionals. As aerospace recovers, we will face renewed challenges with other industries engaging in vigorous competition for the same talent. My company has joined other members of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association to ensure STEM graduates know a rewarding career awaits them with supply chain providers as readily as it does at an OEM or MRO. This is reinforced by our commitment to support developing aerospace talent across our Americas, EMEA and APAC locations.

Finally, there is technology. A 2019 Deloitte survey to assess Industry 4.0 adoption found 84% of A&D executives would consider leveraging new digital technologies for market differentiation. Yet only a quarter were using these data-driven tools to inform decision-making. Technology is a significant enabler for distributors with a massive number of SKUs. At Incora, our Akrivis system leverages the power of our advanced data science and machine learning group to provide step-change improvements in forecasting efficiencies. Our proprietary platform tcmIS enables our chemical management customers to optimise inventory and reduce waste across their global facilities. It is imperative to have systems that reduce manual intervention and enable application of artificial intelligence across service platforms and throughout the supply chain.

The timeless proverb above is often attributed to Plato, whose words may be more simply translated as “Our need will be the great inventor.” This change to the first person is crucial; it reminds us the power to disrupt can come from anywhere, most notably from within.

www.incora.com

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Source: https://www.aero-mag.com/delivering-economic-and-societal-value/

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Aviation

OAM for man who revolutionised RAAF pilot training

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Squadron Leader Scott van Ginkel is an honourable recipient from Air Force Training Group of the Medal of the Order of Australia.
Squadron Leader Scott van Ginkel is an honourable recipient from Air Force Training Group of the Medal of the Order of Australia.

The man who oversaw RAAF’s transition from training pilots on the ageing CT-4B Airtrainer to the modern Pilatus PC-21 has been awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia.

Squadron Leader van Ginkel, currently Standards Flight Commander at No. 1 Flying Training School, RAAF Base East Sale, became one of 1,190 Australians recognised as part of the 2021 Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

Defence said he played a critical role in the implementation of Project AIR 5428, the name for the plan to revolutionise the way pilots are developed by integrating the training among RAAF, RAN and Australian Army pilots.

“It is very humbling to be appreciated for the job you do,” Squadron Leader van Ginkel said.

“The introduction of the new Pilot Training System has been a challenging task that has resulted in a paradigm shift in the way pilots are trained in the Australian Defence Force.

“In some ways I feel like I am accepting this award on behalf of all those who have been involved with the development and implementation of the Pilot Training System.

“Receiving the Medal of the Order of Australia for doing something I enjoy has come as a surprise and it is still sinking in.

PROMOTED CONTENT

“When you enjoy what you do and can see the purpose in it, it doesn’t feel like a job.”

Squadron Leader van Ginkel joined the RAAF in January 1995 from Geelong.

“I have been fortunate to see a lot of Australia and the world throughout my career, particularly flying the C-130J and then again with the introduction of the Pilot Training System,” he said.

“There are so many highlights, it is hard to narrow it down.

“The thrill for flying started when I was young, I had wanted to be a pilot ever since I first travelled on an aircraft as a kid.”

Before Project AIR 5428, flight screening and basic flying training was undertaken by the ADF Basic Flying Training School (BFTS) at Tamworth, NSW.

Operated by BAE Systems Australia with a mix of Defence Force and civilian staff, at BFTS pilots from all three services trained on the CT-4B Airtrainer.

On completion of their basic flying training, RAAF and RAN pilots then moved on to 2FTS at Pearce for advanced flying training on the Pilatus PC-9/A, while Army students complete their training at the School of Army Aviation in Oakey, Queensland.

Under AIR 5428, BFTS and flight screening and basic flying training for all three services moved from Tamworth to East Sale, with pilots now flying the PC-21.

The PC-21, designed to prepare recruits for fifth-generation aircraft such as the F-35, has a pressurised cockpit, air conditioning, anti-G system, on-board oxygen generator and can fly at low-level speeds over 320 knots.

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Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/06/oam-for-man-who-revolutionised-raaf-pilot-training/

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Aviation

OAM for man who revolutionised RAAF pilot training

Published

on

Squadron Leader Scott van Ginkel is an honourable recipient from Air Force Training Group of the Medal of the Order of Australia.
Squadron Leader Scott van Ginkel is an honourable recipient from Air Force Training Group of the Medal of the Order of Australia.

The man who oversaw RAAF’s transition from training pilots on the ageing CT-4B Airtrainer to the modern Pilatus PC-21 has been awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia.

Squadron Leader van Ginkel, currently Standards Flight Commander at No. 1 Flying Training School, RAAF Base East Sale, became one of 1,190 Australians recognised as part of the 2021 Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

Defence said he played a critical role in the implementation of Project AIR 5428, the name for the plan to revolutionise the way pilots are developed by integrating the training among RAAF, RAN and Australian Army pilots.

“It is very humbling to be appreciated for the job you do,” Squadron Leader van Ginkel said.

“The introduction of the new Pilot Training System has been a challenging task that has resulted in a paradigm shift in the way pilots are trained in the Australian Defence Force.

“In some ways I feel like I am accepting this award on behalf of all those who have been involved with the development and implementation of the Pilot Training System.

“Receiving the Medal of the Order of Australia for doing something I enjoy has come as a surprise and it is still sinking in.

PROMOTED CONTENT

“When you enjoy what you do and can see the purpose in it, it doesn’t feel like a job.”

Squadron Leader van Ginkel joined the RAAF in January 1995 from Geelong.

“I have been fortunate to see a lot of Australia and the world throughout my career, particularly flying the C-130J and then again with the introduction of the Pilot Training System,” he said.

“There are so many highlights, it is hard to narrow it down.

“The thrill for flying started when I was young, I had wanted to be a pilot ever since I first travelled on an aircraft as a kid.”

Before Project AIR 5428, flight screening and basic flying training was undertaken by the ADF Basic Flying Training School (BFTS) at Tamworth, NSW.

Operated by BAE Systems Australia with a mix of Defence Force and civilian staff, at BFTS pilots from all three services trained on the CT-4B Airtrainer.

On completion of their basic flying training, RAAF and RAN pilots then moved on to 2FTS at Pearce for advanced flying training on the Pilatus PC-9/A, while Army students complete their training at the School of Army Aviation in Oakey, Queensland.

Under AIR 5428, BFTS and flight screening and basic flying training for all three services moved from Tamworth to East Sale, with pilots now flying the PC-21.

The PC-21, designed to prepare recruits for fifth-generation aircraft such as the F-35, has a pressurised cockpit, air conditioning, anti-G system, on-board oxygen generator and can fly at low-level speeds over 320 knots.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/06/oam-for-man-who-revolutionised-raaf-pilot-training/

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Aerospace

Up, up and away

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Up, up and away

Street Crane produces overhead, gantry and jib cranes and supplies advanced hoists and controls

Aerospace industry crane experts, Street Crane Company celebrates 75 years of lifting. Aerospace Manufacturing reports.

A key supplier to the UK’s aerospace industry, Street Crane Company, celebrate its 75th year of continual innovation in crane technology. The company’s association with the aerospace industry grew substantially in the 1960s and 70s supplying British Aircraft Corporation and Hawker Siddeley, the predecessors to British Aerospace. The relationship has continued throughout the various incarnations to BAE Systems.

Other large Street Crane users include Westland Helicopters – now AgustaWestland – and Short Brothers, as well as Bombardier – now Spirit AeroSystems. Street Crane’s ability to meet the specific technical and safety needs of the aerospace industry made it a natural choice for typical historic application sites at what is now the Airbus factory in Broughton, and the Rolls-Royce engines plant in Derby.

Key features that give aerospace industry users assurance in lifting include an additional hoist brake for increased safety during maintenance operations. Programmable speed control and load dependent speeds ensure precise movements for accurate and safe load positioning. Multi-span cranes with overall spans up to 120m fulfil the needs of wide-span production and maintenance facilities. Anti-sway systems perfectly protect high value loads from damage during travel. Recent installations include Rolls-Royce Derby, Bombardier Aerospace Belfast, MDS Aero, and Muscat Airport.

“”Due to Covid restrictions, it is unlikely that we will be able to mark our 75th year as we have done similar milestones in the past,” explains managing director, Gus Zona. “However, in what has been a difficult year for everyone, it is a note of positive news. Even more positive is that the spirit of our founder continues to drive us forward.”

A family-owned business, Street Crane is said to be the UK’s largest producer of factory overhead, gantry and jib cranes and is a global supplier of advanced hoists and controls to a network of over 100 international independent crane makers.

Peter Street founded the crane company in 1946

It started with Peter Street, a World War II pilot flying Spitfires, Hurricanes and giant Horsa gliders. In 1946, with eighty-eight Pounds Sterling in his pocket given him by the Royal Air Force as ‘gratuity’ for his service to the country, he decided to start a crane company in Sheffield, England and to buy the first company vehicle – a motorbike and side car. He then set about repairing factory cranes in an industrial landscape decimated by war.

“Sadly, Peter is no longer with us, but his spirit lives on,” says Martin Street, Peter’s son and current company chairman. “While Covid hasn’t destroyed industrial infrastructure in the way bombs did all those years ago, he would see similarities in the need to invest, rebuild and innovate.”

Innovate and celebrate

Innovation was at the core of Street Crane’s success from the very beginning. In post war Britain there were material shortages and government controls allocating available materials by strategic priority. Wound rotor motors used at the time to give smooth acceleration on crane travel motions were very hard to find. Peter’s solution was to employ fluid couplings and freely available four-pole motors which meant Street could offer equal or better acceleration at lower prices and shorter lead-times.

Moving forward to today, the current Street ZX hoist range is the sixth generation of hoisting equipment the company has designed and manufactured. In late 2020, Street launched Eazycrane, the online crane configuration software which puts 75 years of know-how and expertise at the fingertips of their distributors around the world. The result of a ten-year investment to automate crane design, drawing, component selection, quotations and order processing, Eazycrane enables Street and its distributors to work within a single system.

“Had Peter survived he would have celebrated his 100th birthday this year,” Street concludes. “Another good reason to remember our founder and the generations of colleagues who did the groundwork upon which we are building our future ability to meet the challenging and changing lifting needs of the aerospace industry.”

www.streetcrane.co.uk

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