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How to Get Started in Cybersecurity

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How to Get Started in Cybersecurity
How to Get Started in Cybersecurity

How to Get Started in Cybersecurity- So, are you considering a job move or simply want to add new information security skills to your arsenal to assist you protect your data and computers? Let’s walk through the steps of moving to cybersecurity, from the brainstorming and planning stages to the skills you’ll need to master and the tools to assist you do so.

Is a College Degree Required for a Career in Cybersecurity?

The short answer is no, it isn’t always the case. “People without college degrees pioneered our industry,” says Josh Feinblum. “Work hard to get active in the community, contribute to open source projects, and attempt to talk at conferences on intriguing research – these are all things that the early pioneers did, and they can create possibilities for smart, hard-working individuals to break into the industry.”

The similar tendency has been observed (and personally experienced) by Kristen Kozinski, who is now an Information Security Trainer at the New York Times.

She notes, “Most of the folks I’ve encountered in the field are self-taught.” “My own route has been pretty unconventional. When I was working at MailChimp a few years ago, our Information Security team had an opening for an apprentice to work with our security engineers. It seemed like the ideal situation. I acquired the job after doing some research on The Open Web Application Security Project. As a Junior Security Engineer, I continued to work with that team.” Don’t Click on That, Kozinski’s security awareness company, is now open for business.

If you have a computer science or equivalent degree, though, it will almost certainly broaden your cybersecurity work prospects. “College degrees are typically a checkbox anticipated by many large companies,” according to Feinblum, “so not having a degree may limit some opportunities.” It’s not a deal-breaker; it’s simply something to think about!

Pick a Cybersecurity Career Path

One of the most interesting aspects about cybersecurity is the variety of options available. You don’t need a technical background to pursue them, as I mentioned earlier.

The first step in deciding on a cybersecurity job path is to assess your strengths in light of your history. “I urge that you do an honest assessment of your own abilities and interests as your first step,” says Robb Reck. “Are you someone who enjoys interacting with others? Are you an app developer? Are you a policy wonk? What is a networking guru?

Creating a list of your preferences and talents can assist you in determining which type of IT security employment is the greatest fit for you. “Penetrating, security engineering, and incident response are some of the most popular areas,” adds Kristen Kozinski.

Once you’ve narrowed it down, conduct more study and learn the jargon for the sectors of interest you’ve chosen within cyber security. “Look for books that delve into that topic,” Kozinski advises. “No Starch Press publishes a number of excellent security books. I also suggest taking a look at the Awesome Infosec Github page, which is a crowdsourced collection of educational resources.”

It will also assist in connecting with individuals in the industry, forming contacts, and seeking guidance. “Join Twitter,” Kozinski advises. “There is a really open cybersecurity community there, and a lot of individuals give wonderful advice on how to obtain jobs and where to locate learning resources in your field of interest.”

In-person groups are also beneficial. “Join organisations like the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA), the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA), or the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA), all of which have regional branches near you,” suggests Robb Reck. “Begin helping with these organisations, and learn about Open Source initiatives on the internet. You don’t need a job to gain security experience. The relationships you develop in those groups will almost certainly lead to your future job.”

Cybersecurity Prerequisites

It’s a good idea to learn the fundamentals of programming before moving on to more advanced topics. “Knowing a programming language will put you ahead of the game in cybersecurity,” says Kristen Kozinski. “You don’t have to be an expert, but knowing how to read and understand a language is a useful skill.” This isn’t a must-have requirement for cyber security, but it’s a great to have.
Learn about the most important cybersecurity technologies and skills.

According to Chris Coleman, successful cybersecurity engineers can also think like a cybercriminal. “One can only forecast and avoid cyberattacks if they have a thorough awareness of system vulnerabilities.”

Other technical skills will differ depending on the field you choose to specialise in. Coleman does, however, propose the following cybersecurity skills:

  • Security and networking foundations
  • Logging and monitoring procedures
  • Network defense tactics
  • Cryptography and access management practices
  • Web application security techniques

So, what is the most effective method for learning cybersecurity? The cornerstone to most security work, no matter what your specialty is—network security, information security, IT security, etc.—is understanding systems. Andy Ellis says, “Learn to take a systems view first when confronting new technology or processes.” “Ask questions like, ‘What is going on in this system that I’m not seeing?’ What are the objectives of the system owner or designer? What kind of inescapable loss might there be? ‘How could this have happened?’

If you’re thinking about payroll system vulnerabilities, for example, you’d start with queries like:

  • How does an employee get paid?
  • Where is their data?
  • How can that fail?

“Asking yourself these questions and knowing the answers is a terrific approach to get started on a path to securing the future,” Ellis continues.

Soft skills, on the other hand, include a willingness to learn — especially since the subject of information security is always changing — as well as the ability to work well in a group.

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Source: https://cybersguards.com/how-to-get-started-in-cyber-security/

Cyber Security

Many IP Camera Vendors’ Firmware Contains Serious Vulnerabilities

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According to France-based cybersecurity firm RandoriSec, IP cameras sold by a dozen vendors are vulnerable to remote assaults due to many major vulnerabilities discovered in the firmware they all share.

Researchers from RandoriSec uncovered a slew of serious and high-severity flaws in UDP Technology’s IP camera firmware, a South Korean business that specialises in digital video solutions for the security and IP surveillance industries.

Earlier this month, the cybersecurity firm published a blog post explaining its discoveries, and the US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) issued an advisory warning users about the risks posed by these flaws on Tuesday.

Since 2017, RandoriSec has been discovering vulnerabilities in UDP Technology firmware. The company’s most recent investigation discovered 11 remote code execution issues and one authentication bypass vulnerability. Unauthenticated attackers can use the vulnerability to take complete control of the cameras in question.

While the flaws were discovered after a study of IP cameras provided by Geutebrück, a German video management solutions company, RandoriSec founder Davy Douhine told SecurityWeek that he is convinced that IP cameras from all other vendors who use the UDP Technology software are also susceptible.

RandoriSec identifies Ganz, Visualint, Cap, THRIVE Intelligence, Sophus, VCA, TripCorps, Sprinx Technologies, Smartec, and Riva as UDP firmware vendors in a blog post explaining its results.

According to Douhine, the authentication bypass vulnerability they discovered can be exploited to directly hack impacted IP cameras over the internet. He provided a Shodan search query with SecurityWeek that revealed over 140 internet-exposed machines, mostly in the United States and the United Kingdom.

The cybersecurity business has been developing Metasploit modules to exploit the UDP vulnerabilities; the first Metasploit modules were disclosed in an attempt to “wake up” the vendor, but it failed.

RandoriSec is now working on a post-exploitation module that may be used to freeze the targeted camera or inject arbitrary pictures, similar to what is shown in movies.

“We’re particularly proud of this last one because it appears to be the first of its sort in Metasploit,” stated Douhine in an email.

UDP Technology did not reply to RandoriSec’s notification attempts, although the company did provide updates after being notified of the vulnerabilities by Geutebruck, according to RandoriSec. Geutebruck has made the patches accessible to its customers, and the cybersecurity firm believes other impacted camera makers have received them as well, though it is unable to confirm this.


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Source: https://cybersguards.com/many-ip-camera-vendors-firmware-contains-serious-vulnerabilities/

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Cyber Security

Cyberattack that Crippled the Computer Systems of a Hospital Network

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According to a University of Vermont Health Network official, a cyberattack that crippled the computer systems of a hospital network affecting six hospitals in Vermont and New York last fall occurred after an employee opened a personal email on a company laptop while on vacation.

According to Doug Gentile, network chief medical information officer, the email came from a legitimate local business that had been hacked. The malware was contained in an attachment in the email. The attackers were ready and waiting when the employee returned from vacation and logged onto the UVM network through a virtual private network, he said.

“We have no evidence that UVM was singled out for attack. “We were just the victims of a large-scale phishing attack,” Gentile said on Tuesday.

VTDigger was the first to report on the attack. Officials said at the time that the October 2020 cyberattack caused significant, ongoing computer network problems for the University of Vermont Health Network, affecting its six hospitals in Vermont and New York. The FBI and two other federal agencies issued an alert the same day, stating that they had “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to US hospitals and healthcare providers.”

By looking through detailed logs, UVM was able to figure out how the cyberattack occurred a week or so later, according to Gentile. It had immediately contacted state and federal authorities, and the FBI had been extremely helpful in the investigation, he said. According to him, the attack was carried out by a criminal gang that the FBI is familiar with.

“These people are virtual and can exist in any location. The majority of them are offshore, out of reach of our law enforcement,” he said.

UVM Health Network had blocked access to personal email for anyone on the network at the time of the attack, but had not yet extended that to machines off the corporate network, which it had planned to do this year, according to Gentile. He claims it has since done so.

The FBI and two other federal agencies issued an alert the same day, stating that they had “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to US hospitals and healthcare providers.”

UVM has blocked access to all corporate assets, installed more advanced viral wall protection on all corporate assets, and significantly tightened its vpn access since the attack, he said.

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Source: https://cybersguards.com/cyberattack-that-crippled-the-computer-systems-of-a-hospital-network/

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Cyber Security

Industrial Automation Software Informed Customers About a Dozen Vulnerabilities

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Cisco

CODESYS, a developer of industrial automation software, notified customers this month of a dozen vulnerabilities impacting a variety of devices. Cisco Talos detected more than half of these issues, and the details were released on Monday.

Vulnerabilities in CODESYS software could have substantial consequences because it is utilised in several large firms’ industrial control systems (ICS). Last month, a cybersecurity firm warned that serious security holes uncovered in CODESYS software exposed programmable logic controllers (PLCs) made by more than a dozen manufacturers to attacks.

CODESYS announced on July 22 that patches for remote code execution, denial of service (DoS), and information disclosure vulnerabilities in its Development System, V3 web server, Gateway, Runtime Toolkit for VxWorks, and EtherNetIP products are now available.

A critical severity rating has been applied to only one vulnerability. The bug, dubbed CVE-2021-33485, is a heap-based buffer overflow in the CODESYS V3 web server that can be used to launch DoS attacks or execute remote code using specially crafted requests.

Cisco’s Talos research and threat intelligence unit uncovered seven vulnerabilities, according to a CODESYS alert. Researchers from Talos discovered that unsafe deserialization flaws in the CODESYS Development System, a programming tool for industrial control and automation systems, can lead to remote code execution.

An attacker could take advantage of these flaws by altering local configuration or profile files, or duping a local user into opening malicious project or archive files.

The manufacturer stated that it was unaware of any attacks exploiting these holes, but that security scanners can exacerbate some of the flaws.

CODESYS stated in each advisory that the vulnerabilities can be exploited by an attacker with limited capabilities.


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Source: https://cybersguards.com/industrial-automation-software-informed-customers-about-a-dozen-vulnerabilities/

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Cyber Security

1Password Announced Receiving a $100 Million Increases its Valuation to $2 Billion

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1Password, a password management software company, revealed today that it has received a $100 million investment, bringing its total worth to $2 billion. The company had raised $200 million in a Series A round of funding.

Accel led the newest round of fundraising, which also included new investors Sound Ventures and Skip Capital. The funds will be used to help 1Password continue to build its business, according to the company.

Secrets Automation, 1Password Events, and a full-featured Linux desktop application, as well as connections with Slack and Rippling, the company claims it has achieved considerable growth since the previous financing round and has expanded its commercial services over the past months.

1Password, which was founded in 2005, provides private, secure password management solutions for both businesses and end-users. GitLab, IBM, Intercom, Slack, and Under Armour are among the company’s more than 90,000 enterprise customers.

“This contribution from a diverse group of industry leaders demonstrates a dedication to safeguarding businesses and families. As we assist clients keep ahead of the never-ending parade of dangers, we’re already working closely with our seasoned investors to drive growth into new areas, like secrets management,” said Jeff Shiner, CEO of 1Password.


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Source: https://cybersguards.com/1password-announced-receiving-a-100-million-increases-its-valuation-to-2-billion/

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