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How to Find The Stinky Parts of Your Code (Part X)

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@mcseeMaximiliano Contieri

I’m senior software engineer specialized in declarative designs and S.O.L.I.D. and Agile lover.

More code smells. No joke.

We see several symptoms and situations that make us doubt the quality of our development.

Let’s look at some possible solutions.

Most of these smells are just hints of something that might be wrong. They are not rigid rules.

This is part V. Part I can be found here, Part II here, Part III is here, Part IV herepart VVI, VII, VIII and IX.

Let’s continue…

Code Smell 46 — Repeated Code

DRY is our mantra. Teachers tell us to remove duplication. We need to go beyond.

Photo by Sid Balachandran on Unsplash

Problems

Solutions

  1. Find repeated patterns (not repeated code).
  2. Create an abstraction.
  3. Parametrize abstraction calls.
  4. Use composition and never inheritance.
  5. Unit test new abstraction.

Sample Code

Wrong

Right

Detection

Linters can find repeated code.

There are not very good finding similar patterns.

Maybe soon machine learning will help us find such abstractions automatically.

For now, it is up to us, humans.

Examples

Tags

  • Duplication

Conclusion

Repeated code is always a smell.

Copying and pasting code is always a shame.

With our refactoring tools, we need to accept the duplication remove challenge trusting our tests as a safety net.

More info

Copy and paste is a design error.

David Parnas

Code Smell 47 — Diagrams

Diagrams are not code. They cannot be a code smell. They are just Diagram Smells.

Photo by Nick Seagrave on Unsplash

Problems

  • Maintainability
  • Trash code
  • Code Duplication
  • Diagrams focus only on structure (accidental) and not behavior (essential).

Solutions

  1. Use diagrams only to communicate ideas with other humans.
  2. Program on your favorite IDE.Thrash all diagrams.
  3. Even the ones generated from the source code.
  4. Trust your tests. They are alive and well maintained.
  5. Use Domain Driven Design technique.

Sample Code

Wrong

Right

Detection

We can remove all code annotations and forbid them by policy.

Examples

Conclusion

Designing is a contact sport. We need to prototype and learn from our running models.

Papers and JPGs don’t run. They live in the utopic world where everything works smoothly.

CASE was a very hot trend back in the 90s. No good system was developed with these tools.

More info

The Diagram is Not the Model. The model is not the diagram. It is an abstraction, a set of concepts and relationships between them.

Eric Evans

Code Smell 48 — Code Without Standards

Working on a solo project is easy. Unless you go back to it after some months. Working with many other developers requires some agreements.

Photo by De Jesus de Blas — Russia

Problems

  • Maintainability
  • Readability

Solutions

  1. Automate your styles and indentation.
  2. Enforce agreed policies.

Sample Code

Wrong

Correct sample taken from Sandro Mancuso’s bank kata

Right

The right example has several other smells, but we keep it loyal to its GIT version in order to show only code standardization issues.

Detection

Linters and IDEs should test coding standards before a merge request is approved.

We can add our own naming conventions related to Objects, Classes, Interfaces, Modules etc.

Examples

Tags

  • Standardization

Conclusion

Use coding standards in your projects.

A well-written clean code always follows standards about naming conventions, formatting and code style.

Such standards are helpful because they make things clear and deterministic for the ones who read your code, including yourself.

Code styling should be automatic and mandatory on large organizations to enforce Collective Ownership.

More info

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.

Andrew S. Tannenbaum

Code Smell 49 — Caches

Caches are sexy. They are a one-night stand. We need to avoid them in a long-term relationship.

Photo by Aimee Vogelsang on Unsplash

Problems

  • Coupling
  • Testability
  • Cache invalidation.
  • Maintainability
  • Premature Optimization
  • Erratic Behavior
  • Lack of transparency
  • Non-Deterministic behavior

Solutions

  1. If you have a conclusive benchmark and are willing to pay for some coupling: Put an object in the middle.
  2. Unit test all your invalidation scenarios. Experience shows we face them in an incremental way.
  3. Look for a real world cache metaphor and model it.

Sample Code

Wrong

Right

Detection

This is a design smell.

It will be difficult to enforce by policy.

Tags

  • Premature Optimization

Conclusion

Caches should be functional and intelligent.

In this way we can manage invalidation.

General purpose caches are suitable only for low level objects like operating systems, files and streams.

We shouldn’t cache domain objects.

This page is hosted on a cached website.

More Info

There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things.

Phil Karlton

Code Smell 50 — Object Keys

Primary keys, IDs, references. The first attribute we add to our objects. They don’t exist in the real world.

Photo by Maurice Williams on Unsplash

Problems

Solutions

  1. Reference object to objects.
  2. Build a MAPPER.
  3. Only use keys if you need to provide an external (accidental) reference. Databases, APIs, Serializations.
  4. Use dark keys or GUIDs when possible.
  5. If you are afraid of getting a big relation graph use proxies or lazy loading.
  6. Don’t use DTOs.

Sample Code

Wrong

Right

Detection

This is a design policy.

We can enforce business objects to warn us if we define an attribute or function including the sequence id.

Tags

  • Accidental

Conclusion

Ids are not necessary for OOP. You reference objects (essential) and never ids (accidental).

In case you need to provide a reference out of your system’s scope (APIs, interfaces, Serializations) use dark and meaningless IDs (GUIDs).

More info

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.

David Wheeler

We are done for some time.

But we are pretty sure we will come across even more smells very soon!

I keep getting more suggestions on twitter, so they won’t be the last!

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Techcrunch

Daily Crunch: A huge fintech exit as the week ends

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To get a roundup of TechCrunch’s biggest and most important stories delivered to your inbox every day at 3 p.m. PDT, subscribe here.

Our thanks to everyone who wrote in this week about the format changes to the newsletter! Feedback largely sorted into two themes: Some people really like the more narrative format, and some folks really want a more link-list styled missive. What follows is an attempt to balance both perspectives.

Starting today we’ll bold company names, so that you can more quickly pick out startups, add more bulleted points to sections, and, per a different piece of feedback, include more regular descriptors of companies that are not household names.

That said, we’re not going to abandon chatting with you every day, as TechCrunch is nothing if not full of things to say. So here’s a blend of what the new, updated Daily Crunch team had in mind, and your notes. A big thanks to everyone who wrote in!

Alex @alex on Twitter

A mega-exit for American fintech

The news that public fintech company Bill.com will buy Divvy, a Utah-based startup that helps small and midsized businesses manage their spend, was perhaps the biggest startup story of the week. Breaking late Thursday, the $2.5 billion transaction was long expected. Divvy had raised more than $400 million from PayPal Ventures, New Enterprise Associates, Insight Partners and Pelion Venture Partners.

TechCrunch covered the impending sale, rumors of which sprung up before Bill.com reported its Q1 earnings. To see the company drop the news at the same time as its earnings was not a surprise. For the burgeoning corporate payment space (more here on startups in the space like Ramp, Airbase and Brex).

I got to noodle on the financial results that Bill.com detailed regarding Divvy — they are pretty key metrics to help us value the startups that are competing to go public or find a similarly feathered corporate nest. In short, the corporate spend startup cohort is doing great. It’s even spawning new startups like Latin American-focused Clara, which raised $3.5 million earlier this year.

Broadly, the fintech market had a huge Q1 and is blasting its way toward a record venture capital year, like AI startups and the rest of the VC world.

Startups and venture capital

5 investors discuss the future of RPA after UiPath’s IPO

Much ink (erm, pixels) has been spilled about robotic process automation (RPA) recently, particularly in the wake of UiPath’s IPO last month.

But while some of the individuals Ron interviewed about the future of RPA believe the technology is in its “early infancy,” the pandemic increased attention toward things we can let robots handle for us. And it’s hard to argue that repetitive tasks like billing and spreadsheeting and paper-pushing should not be outsourced to robots.

“RPA allows companies to automate a group of highly mundane tasks and have a machine do the work instead of a human,” Ron writes. “Think of finding an invoice amount in an email, placing the figure in a spreadsheet and sending a Slack message to accounts payable. You could have humans do that, or you could do it more quickly and efficiently with a machine. We’re talking mind-numbing work that is well suited to automation.”

Although RPA is the fastest-growing category in enterprise software, the market remains surprisingly small. Ron spoke to five investors about where the sector is headed, where there are opportunities and the biggest threats to the RPA startup ecosystem.

(Extra Crunch is our membership program, which helps founders and startup teams get ahead. You can sign up here.)

The tech giants

It was a quieter day from the tech giants, who made plenty of news earlier in the week. The good news is that their relative calm means we can take a look at news from other Big Tech companies, those that don’t quite crack the $1 trillion market cap threshold yet:

Community

Some of us are mourning the shutdown of Nuzzel, so we asked … would you pay for it (and why)? Let us know what you think!

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Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/05/07/daily-crunch-a-huge-fintech-exit-as-the-week-ends/

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COVID-19 coverage dominates as National Newspaper Awards winners are announced – Globe and Mail’s Tom Cardoso named Journalist of the Year

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TORONTO, May 7, 2021 /CNW/ – Coverage of COVID-19, from first-person reporting and poignant photographs to in-depth investigations and bitingly satirical editorial cartoons, dominated as winners of the 2020 National Newspaper Awards were announced.

Nearly half of the 66 finalists were nominated for work that related in some way to the pandemic that dominated news coverage in 2020, and 10 of the 22 winning entries were for submissions entirely or mostly about COVID.

Entries dealing with the pandemic won in Beat Reporting, Business, Columns, Editorial Cartooning, Feature Photo, General News Photo, Long Feature, Project of the Year, Short Feature and the one new category this year, Sustained News Coverage.

Bucking the COVID-centric trend, Tom Cardoso of the Globe and Mail was named Journalist of the Year for an investigation that exposed systemic bias against Indigenous, Black and female prisoners in Canada’s corrections system.

Cardoso, who also won the George Brown Award for Investigations, was among 15 category winners considered for Journalist of the Year honours. He was selected by a panel comprising two former NNA winners and a former category judge, from among winning entries that had been submitted by one or two individuals.

Cardoso’s work was described by Journalist of the Year judges as resonating “like thunder” amid growing concerns about racial bias within the RCMP and other Canadian police forces. He obtained difficult-to-access data, created sophisticated programs to analyze it, and found compelling stories about the people reflected in the numbers.

Judges said Cardoso’s investigation proved beyond an iota of doubt that the standard evaluations used to determine the likelihood of prisoners being rehabilitated – and thus receiving access to useful programming and better conditions – are profoundly and systemically biased against individuals from racialized backgrounds. He also discovered that Corrections officials were aware of the situation, and had done nothing to rectify it.

Judges said his work revealed how Canada sometimes overlooks or condones injustice, and created an important foundation on which a correctional system that deals more constructively and equitably with those convicted of crime might be built.

Cardoso’s win in the Investigations category was one of 10 by the Globe and Mail. Other organizations winning multiple awards were La Presse and the Canadian Press with three each, and Le Devoir and the Toronto Star with two apiece. One of the Star’s two wins was shared with the Halifax Chronicle Herald (for Michael de Adder in the Editorial Cartooning category).

Geoffrey York of the Globe and Mail has his name on a winning entry for the fifth time in his career. York, who was a winner in two categories last year, was one of five Globe and Mail journalists who teamed up in 2020 to win the John Wesley Dafoe Award for Politics. Another member of that team, Paul Waldie, has now won four NNAs in his career.

Erin Anderssen of the Globe and Andrew Vaughan of the Canadian Press also won for the fourth time. Anderssen won the Bob Levin Award for Short Feature, and Vaughan won the Breaking News Photo category.

Leah Hennel of the Globe and Mail won her third NNA, this time in the Sports Photo category. Isabelle Hachey of La Presse (William Southam Award for Long Feature) won her second, as did Jacques Nadeau of Le Devoir (General News Photo) and André Picard of the Globe (Columns).

Several individuals took home top honours for the first time after being nominated previously. They include Michael de Adder (Editorial Cartooning), the Globe’s Johanna Schneller (Arts and Entertainment) and the Globe’s Nathan VanderKlippe (Norman Webster Award for International Reporting). Each came into this year’s competition having been a finalist four times previously. Ariane Lacoursière of La Presse, who won the E. Cora Hind Award for Beat Reporting, had been a finalist three previous times.

There were 66 finalists from 20 news organizations in 22 categories. Finalists and winners were selected by three-judge panels in each category from 926 entries submitted for work published in 2020.

This is the 72nd year for the awards program, and the 32nd under the current administrative structure. The awards were established by the Toronto Press Club in 1949 to encourage excellence and reward achievement in daily newspaper work in Canada. The competition is now open to newspapers, news agencies and online news sites approved for entry by the NNA Board of Governors.

Thanks to donations from sponsors, seven of the 22 category awards are named after important figures in the news industry. They are:

  • George Brown Award for Investigations (sponsored by the Globe and Mail)
  • John Wesley Dafoe Award for Politics (sponsored by Ron Stern)
  • E. Cora Hind Award for Beat Reporting (sponsored by the Nellie McClung Heritage Site)
  • Bob Levin Award for Short Feature (sponsored by the Globe and Mail)
  • Claude Ryan Award for Editorial Writing (sponsored by the Ryan family)
  • William Southam Award for Long Feature (sponsored by the Fisher, Bowen and Balfour families)
  • Norman Webster Award for International Reporting (sponsored by the Webster family)

A complete list of winners and finalists:

Arts and Entertainment
Winner: Johanna Schneller, Globe and Mail, for columns tackling the subject of gender identity and gender politics in the arts world.
Finalists: Améli Pineda, Le Devoir, for an investigation into accusations by nine women about assault or sexual misconduct by comedian Julien Lacroix; Jean Siag, La Presse, for articles about sexual abuse and misconduct in the circus industry.

E. Cora Hind Award for Beat Reporting
Winner: Ariane Lacoursière, La Presse, for her work covering health and in particular COVID-19.
Finalists: Aaron Derfel, Montreal Gazette, for his work on the health and COVID-19 beat; Leah Gerber, Waterloo Region Record, for her work on the environment beat, with a focus on the Grand River watershed.

Breaking News
Winner: The Canadian Press for coverage of the shocking killing rampage that left 22 people dead in Nova Scotia.
Finalists: The Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star, both for coverage of the shooting down of a passenger jet in Iran that killed 176 people, including dozens of Canadians.

Breaking News Photo
Winner: Andrew Vaughan, Canadian Press, for a photo of the body of Gabriel Wortman, shot and killed by police at a gas station after he killed 22 people during a 13-hour rampage in Nova Scotia.
Finalists: Darryl Dyck, Canadian Press, for a photograph of two men clashing at a Black Lives Matter protest in Vancouver; Chris Young, Canadian Press, for a picture showing the anguish of a man as authorities broke up an encampment inhabited by homeless persons in downtown Toronto.

Business
Winners: Kenyon Wallace, Marco Chown Oved, Ed Tubb and Brendan Kennedy, Toronto Star, for uncovering the fact that death rates from COVID-19 were higher in for-profit homes than in other types of long-term care residences.
Finalists: Tom Blackwell, National Post, for a report connecting the dots between the demise of Nortel and the rise of Huawei; Kathryn Blaze Baum, Tavia Grant and Carrie Tait, Globe and Mail, for shining a light on how the health and safety of some workers in Canada’s food-supply chain were compromised during the pandemic.

Columns
Winner: André Picard, Globe and Mail
Finalists: Isabelle Hachey, La Presse; Richard Warnica, National Post

Editorial Cartooning
Winner: Michael de Adder, Halifax Chronicle Herald/Toronto Star
Finalists: Graeme MacKay, Hamilton Spectator; Bruce MacKinnon, Halifax Chronicle Herald

Claude Ryan Award for Editorial Writing
Winner: Ryan Stelter, Kenora Miner and News
Finalists: François Cardinal, La Presse; Heather Persson, Saskatoon StarPhoenix/Regina Leader-Post

Explanatory Work
Winner: Tristan Péloquin, La Presse, for concretely explaining the risks and pitfalls associated with artificial intelligence technologies such as facial recognition.
Finalists: Kate Allen, Rachel Mendleson, Jennifer Yang and Andrew Bailey, Toronto Star, for using graphics, maps and enterprising analysis to upend assumptions about how COVID-19’s first wave spread through Toronto; Kathy Tomlinson and Grant Robertson, Globe and Mail, for mining public health documents to ask a critical question in the early days of COVID-19: “How well did the Canadian government follow its own plans”?

Feature Photo
Winner: Nathan Denette, Canadian Press, for a photo of a woman hugging her mother through a plastic “hug glove” the woman created so the family could embrace despite COVID-19 restrictions.
Finalists: Steve Russell, Toronto Star, for an image of a couple dining on a restaurant patio despite heavy rainfall; Fred Thornhill, Canadian Press, for a picture of a paddleboarder out for an early-morning paddle on the Trent-Severn waterway.

General News Photo
Winner: Jacques Nadeau, Le Devoir, for a photograph of life in a Quebec long-term care facility during COVID-19, including a worker in a “hazmat” suit.
Finalists: Veronica Henri, Toronto Sun, for the poignant image of a mother in a long-term care facility reaching towards her daughter through a window during a separation caused by COVID-19; Carlos Osorio, Reuters, for a picture that cleverly demonstrated different approaches to COVID-19 in Canada and the U.S.: a Canadian tour boat at Niagara Falls was limited to just six passengers, while an American boat was packed.

Norman Webster Award for International Reporting
Winner: Nathan VanderKlippe, Globe and Mail, for coverage of repression in the Chinese region of Xianjiang.
Finalists: Tom Blackwell, National Post, for three stories that depicted Oregon’s unique role as an epicentre of human unrest and natural destruction during the U.S. election season; Mark MacKinnon, Globe and Mail, for reporting about how Vladimir Putin has changed Russia, eastern Europe and the entire world.

George Brown Award for Investigations
Winner: Tom Cardoso, Globe and Mail, for an investigation that uncovered systemic bias against Indigenous, Black and female prisoners in Canada’s corrections system.
Finalists: Rachel Mendleson and Wendy Gillis, Toronto Star, for delving deeply into how much physical force police officers use against Canadian citizens; Grant Robertson, Globe and Mail, for uncovering considerable evidence that the federal government was unprepared for COVID-19 because its Global Public Health Intelligence Network was no longer functional.

Local Reporting
Winner: The Saskatoon StarPhoenix for “Abandoned Saskatchewan,” an effort to come to grips with the profound metamorphosis of a province that is proud of its rural roots, yet increasingly urban.
Finalists: Karla Meza, Le Devoir, for reports exploring how COVID-19 was especially troublesome for asylum seekers looking to build a new life in Canada; Terry Pender, Waterloo Region Record, for a detailed look at how a member of a Second World War Nazi death squad avoided deportation despite overwhelming evidence, much of it kept hidden from the public.

William Southam Award for Long Feature
Winner: Isabelle Hachey, La Presse, for “Cinq jours en zone rouge,” a first-person account of working in a COVID hospital ward.
Finalists: Roger Levesque, Edmonton Journal/Edmonton Sun, for a sombre meditation on receiving, and coming to accept, a diagnosis of inoperable cancer in a year when death seems to be all around; Jana G. Pruden, Globe and Mail, for an in-depth examination of how a case involving 13 counts of sexual assault played out in court, and what that said about how the justice system grapples with such cases.

John Wesley Dafoe Award for Politics
Winners: Bill Curry, Marieke Walsh, Paul Waldie, Geoffrey York and Jaren Kerr, Globe and Mail, for an in-depth look at the public policy questions raised by the WE scandal, and at the WE organization itself.
Finalists: Dan Fumano, Vancouver Sun, for reporting on troubling allegations of systemic racism in the Vancouver police force; Katia Gagnon, Kathleen Lévesque and Tristan Péloquin, La Presse, for a definitive portrait of “the man in shadows,” a businessman who is the Quebec Liberal party’s chief fundraiser and power broker.

Presentation/Design
Winners: Laura Blenkinsop, Jeremy Agius and Timothy Moore, Globe and Mail, for an interactive approach that helped bring readers close to the experience thousands of Mexican families have had searching for loved ones who disappeared since the start of Mexico’s “war on drugs” 15 years ago.
Finalists: Bob Bishop, Toronto Star, for a front-page design that cleverly used the 50 states of the U.S. to illustrate an election that was almost certainly not going to be decided by the time readers got their newspapers; A Globe and Mail team for an immersive experience showcasing photographs that document how Canada and its allies are bracing for an unknown future wrought by climate change in the Arctic.

Project of the Year
Winner: Le Devoir for its efforts to document and investigate how COVID-19 affected almost every facet of life in Quebec in 2020.
Finalists: Gabrielle Duchaine and Caroline Touzin, La Presse, for investigating the explosion of child pornography on the Internet, and discovering how predators exchanged advice online about using the pandemic to increase exploitation and abuse of minors; The Toronto Star for reinventing its newsroom to offer readers a lifeline of information and guidance to help them cope with the worst health disaster Canada has ever faced.

Bob Levin Award for Short Feature
Winner: Erin Anderssen, Globe and Mail, for her moving account of a long-term care worker who offered comfort to COVID-stricken residents so that they didn’t have to spend their last moments alone.
Finalists: Louise Dickson, Victoria Times Colonist, for a heartbreaking story about a mother’s unrelenting efforts to save her opioid-addicted son; Ben Waldman, Winnipeg Free Press, for turning a focus on one family’s attempt to salvage the hockey season into a look at efforts across the city and country to maintain touchstones in a world turned upside down by COVID-19.

Sports
Winner: Michael Doyle, Globe and Mail, for exposing sexual, psychological and physical abuse and manipulation of elite athletes by the most powerful person in Canadian track and field.
Finalists: Cathal Kelly, Globe and Mail, for columns about the Brier curling championship, soccer legend Maradona and the banality of athlete interviews; Melissa Martin, Winnipeg Free Press, for “First Nations Voices, Canada’s Game,” a behind-the-scenes look at APTN’s Hometown Hockey in Cree TV broadcast.

Sports Photo
Winner: Leah Hennel, Globe and Mail, for a picture of an Olympic water polo athlete training in a makeshift pool made from hay bales and tarps.
Finalists: Jacques Boissinot, Canadian Press, for the image of a freestyle skier tumbling to earth after a jump went wrong; Frank Gunn, Canadian Press, for his photo of a collision between a Toronto Maple Leafs player and a Carolina Hurricanes goaltender.

Sustained News Coverage
Winner: The Globe and Mail for its coverage of the devastation inside Canada’s long-term care homes from the spread of COVID-19.
Finalsts: Aaron Beswick, Halifax Chronicle Herald, for providing context and analysis of the violence that unfolded on the water and on land in response to the Mi’kmaw’s push to pursue a fishery that would provide a moderate livelihood, as required by Supreme Court rulings; La Presse for its coverage of the crisis that emerged in Quebec’s long-term care accommodation centres from the spread of COVID-19.

Nominated entries can be viewed at the NNA website at www.nna-ccj.ca. The link to the nominated entries can be found on the right side of the home page, just below the photo of the 2019 Journalist of the Year (Randy Richmond of the London Free Press).

Our thanks to Cision for sponsoring this announcement.

SOURCE National Newspaper Awards

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COVID-19 coverage dominates as National Newspaper Awards winners are announced – Globe and Mail’s Tom Cardoso named Journalist of the Year

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TORONTO, May 7, 2021 /CNW/ – Coverage of COVID-19, from first-person reporting and poignant photographs to in-depth investigations and bitingly satirical editorial cartoons, dominated as winners of the 2020 National Newspaper Awards were announced.

Nearly half of the 66 finalists were nominated for work that related in some way to the pandemic that dominated news coverage in 2020, and 10 of the 22 winning entries were for submissions entirely or mostly about COVID.

Entries dealing with the pandemic won in Beat Reporting, Business, Columns, Editorial Cartooning, Feature Photo, General News Photo, Long Feature, Project of the Year, Short Feature and the one new category this year, Sustained News Coverage.

Bucking the COVID-centric trend, Tom Cardoso of the Globe and Mail was named Journalist of the Year for an investigation that exposed systemic bias against Indigenous, Black and female prisoners in Canada’s corrections system.

Cardoso, who also won the George Brown Award for Investigations, was among 15 category winners considered for Journalist of the Year honours. He was selected by a panel comprising two former NNA winners and a former category judge, from among winning entries that had been submitted by one or two individuals.

Cardoso’s work was described by Journalist of the Year judges as resonating “like thunder” amid growing concerns about racial bias within the RCMP and other Canadian police forces. He obtained difficult-to-access data, created sophisticated programs to analyze it, and found compelling stories about the people reflected in the numbers.

Judges said Cardoso’s investigation proved beyond an iota of doubt that the standard evaluations used to determine the likelihood of prisoners being rehabilitated – and thus receiving access to useful programming and better conditions – are profoundly and systemically biased against individuals from racialized backgrounds. He also discovered that Corrections officials were aware of the situation, and had done nothing to rectify it.

Judges said his work revealed how Canada sometimes overlooks or condones injustice, and created an important foundation on which a correctional system that deals more constructively and equitably with those convicted of crime might be built.

Cardoso’s win in the Investigations category was one of 10 by the Globe and Mail. Other organizations winning multiple awards were La Presse and the Canadian Press with three each, and Le Devoir and the Toronto Star with two apiece. One of the Star’s two wins was shared with the Halifax Chronicle Herald (for Michael de Adder in the Editorial Cartooning category).

Geoffrey York of the Globe and Mail has his name on a winning entry for the fifth time in his career. York, who was a winner in two categories last year, was one of five Globe and Mail journalists who teamed up in 2020 to win the John Wesley Dafoe Award for Politics. Another member of that team, Paul Waldie, has now won four NNAs in his career.

Erin Anderssen of the Globe and Andrew Vaughan of the Canadian Press also won for the fourth time. Anderssen won the Bob Levin Award for Short Feature, and Vaughan won the Breaking News Photo category.

Leah Hennel of the Globe and Mail won her third NNA, this time in the Sports Photo category. Isabelle Hachey of La Presse (William Southam Award for Long Feature) won her second, as did Jacques Nadeau of Le Devoir (General News Photo) and André Picard of the Globe (Columns).

Several individuals took home top honours for the first time after being nominated previously. They include Michael de Adder (Editorial Cartooning), the Globe’s Johanna Schneller (Arts and Entertainment) and the Globe’s Nathan VanderKlippe (Norman Webster Award for International Reporting). Each came into this year’s competition having been a finalist four times previously. Ariane Lacoursière of La Presse, who won the E. Cora Hind Award for Beat Reporting, had been a finalist three previous times.

There were 66 finalists from 20 news organizations in 22 categories. Finalists and winners were selected by three-judge panels in each category from 926 entries submitted for work published in 2020.

This is the 72nd year for the awards program, and the 32nd under the current administrative structure. The awards were established by the Toronto Press Club in 1949 to encourage excellence and reward achievement in daily newspaper work in Canada. The competition is now open to newspapers, news agencies and online news sites approved for entry by the NNA Board of Governors.

Thanks to donations from sponsors, seven of the 22 category awards are named after important figures in the news industry. They are:

  • George Brown Award for Investigations (sponsored by the Globe and Mail)
  • John Wesley Dafoe Award for Politics (sponsored by Ron Stern)
  • E. Cora Hind Award for Beat Reporting (sponsored by the Nellie McClung Heritage Site)
  • Bob Levin Award for Short Feature (sponsored by the Globe and Mail)
  • Claude Ryan Award for Editorial Writing (sponsored by the Ryan family)
  • William Southam Award for Long Feature (sponsored by the Fisher, Bowen and Balfour families)
  • Norman Webster Award for International Reporting (sponsored by the Webster family)

A complete list of winners and finalists:

Arts and Entertainment
Winner: Johanna Schneller, Globe and Mail, for columns tackling the subject of gender identity and gender politics in the arts world.
Finalists: Améli Pineda, Le Devoir, for an investigation into accusations by nine women about assault or sexual misconduct by comedian Julien Lacroix; Jean Siag, La Presse, for articles about sexual abuse and misconduct in the circus industry.

E. Cora Hind Award for Beat Reporting
Winner: Ariane Lacoursière, La Presse, for her work covering health and in particular COVID-19.
Finalists: Aaron Derfel, Montreal Gazette, for his work on the health and COVID-19 beat; Leah Gerber, Waterloo Region Record, for her work on the environment beat, with a focus on the Grand River watershed.

Breaking News
Winner: The Canadian Press for coverage of the shocking killing rampage that left 22 people dead in Nova Scotia.
Finalists: The Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star, both for coverage of the shooting down of a passenger jet in Iran that killed 176 people, including dozens of Canadians.

Breaking News Photo
Winner: Andrew Vaughan, Canadian Press, for a photo of the body of Gabriel Wortman, shot and killed by police at a gas station after he killed 22 people during a 13-hour rampage in Nova Scotia.
Finalists: Darryl Dyck, Canadian Press, for a photograph of two men clashing at a Black Lives Matter protest in Vancouver; Chris Young, Canadian Press, for a picture showing the anguish of a man as authorities broke up an encampment inhabited by homeless persons in downtown Toronto.

Business
Winners: Kenyon Wallace, Marco Chown Oved, Ed Tubb and Brendan Kennedy, Toronto Star, for uncovering the fact that death rates from COVID-19 were higher in for-profit homes than in other types of long-term care residences.
Finalists: Tom Blackwell, National Post, for a report connecting the dots between the demise of Nortel and the rise of Huawei; Kathryn Blaze Baum, Tavia Grant and Carrie Tait, Globe and Mail, for shining a light on how the health and safety of some workers in Canada’s food-supply chain were compromised during the pandemic.

Columns
Winner: André Picard, Globe and Mail
Finalists: Isabelle Hachey, La Presse; Richard Warnica, National Post

Editorial Cartooning
Winner: Michael de Adder, Halifax Chronicle Herald/Toronto Star
Finalists: Graeme MacKay, Hamilton Spectator; Bruce MacKinnon, Halifax Chronicle Herald

Claude Ryan Award for Editorial Writing
Winner: Ryan Stelter, Kenora Miner and News
Finalists: François Cardinal, La Presse; Heather Persson, Saskatoon StarPhoenix/Regina Leader-Post

Explanatory Work
Winner: Tristan Péloquin, La Presse, for concretely explaining the risks and pitfalls associated with artificial intelligence technologies such as facial recognition.
Finalists: Kate Allen, Rachel Mendleson, Jennifer Yang and Andrew Bailey, Toronto Star, for using graphics, maps and enterprising analysis to upend assumptions about how COVID-19’s first wave spread through Toronto; Kathy Tomlinson and Grant Robertson, Globe and Mail, for mining public health documents to ask a critical question in the early days of COVID-19: “How well did the Canadian government follow its own plans”?

Feature Photo
Winner: Nathan Denette, Canadian Press, for a photo of a woman hugging her mother through a plastic “hug glove” the woman created so the family could embrace despite COVID-19 restrictions.
Finalists: Steve Russell, Toronto Star, for an image of a couple dining on a restaurant patio despite heavy rainfall; Fred Thornhill, Canadian Press, for a picture of a paddleboarder out for an early-morning paddle on the Trent-Severn waterway.

General News Photo
Winner: Jacques Nadeau, Le Devoir, for a photograph of life in a Quebec long-term care facility during COVID-19, including a worker in a “hazmat” suit.
Finalists: Veronica Henri, Toronto Sun, for the poignant image of a mother in a long-term care facility reaching towards her daughter through a window during a separation caused by COVID-19; Carlos Osorio, Reuters, for a picture that cleverly demonstrated different approaches to COVID-19 in Canada and the U.S.: a Canadian tour boat at Niagara Falls was limited to just six passengers, while an American boat was packed.

Norman Webster Award for International Reporting
Winner: Nathan VanderKlippe, Globe and Mail, for coverage of repression in the Chinese region of Xianjiang.
Finalists: Tom Blackwell, National Post, for three stories that depicted Oregon’s unique role as an epicentre of human unrest and natural destruction during the U.S. election season; Mark MacKinnon, Globe and Mail, for reporting about how Vladimir Putin has changed Russia, eastern Europe and the entire world.

George Brown Award for Investigations
Winner: Tom Cardoso, Globe and Mail, for an investigation that uncovered systemic bias against Indigenous, Black and female prisoners in Canada’s corrections system.
Finalists: Rachel Mendleson and Wendy Gillis, Toronto Star, for delving deeply into how much physical force police officers use against Canadian citizens; Grant Robertson, Globe and Mail, for uncovering considerable evidence that the federal government was unprepared for COVID-19 because its Global Public Health Intelligence Network was no longer functional.

Local Reporting
Winner: The Saskatoon StarPhoenix for “Abandoned Saskatchewan,” an effort to come to grips with the profound metamorphosis of a province that is proud of its rural roots, yet increasingly urban.
Finalists: Karla Meza, Le Devoir, for reports exploring how COVID-19 was especially troublesome for asylum seekers looking to build a new life in Canada; Terry Pender, Waterloo Region Record, for a detailed look at how a member of a Second World War Nazi death squad avoided deportation despite overwhelming evidence, much of it kept hidden from the public.

William Southam Award for Long Feature
Winner: Isabelle Hachey, La Presse, for “Cinq jours en zone rouge,” a first-person account of working in a COVID hospital ward.
Finalists: Roger Levesque, Edmonton Journal/Edmonton Sun, for a sombre meditation on receiving, and coming to accept, a diagnosis of inoperable cancer in a year when death seems to be all around; Jana G. Pruden, Globe and Mail, for an in-depth examination of how a case involving 13 counts of sexual assault played out in court, and what that said about how the justice system grapples with such cases.

John Wesley Dafoe Award for Politics
Winners: Bill Curry, Marieke Walsh, Paul Waldie, Geoffrey York and Jaren Kerr, Globe and Mail, for an in-depth look at the public policy questions raised by the WE scandal, and at the WE organization itself.
Finalists: Dan Fumano, Vancouver Sun, for reporting on troubling allegations of systemic racism in the Vancouver police force; Katia Gagnon, Kathleen Lévesque and Tristan Péloquin, La Presse, for a definitive portrait of “the man in shadows,” a businessman who is the Quebec Liberal party’s chief fundraiser and power broker.

Presentation/Design
Winners: Laura Blenkinsop, Jeremy Agius and Timothy Moore, Globe and Mail, for an interactive approach that helped bring readers close to the experience thousands of Mexican families have had searching for loved ones who disappeared since the start of Mexico’s “war on drugs” 15 years ago.
Finalists: Bob Bishop, Toronto Star, for a front-page design that cleverly used the 50 states of the U.S. to illustrate an election that was almost certainly not going to be decided by the time readers got their newspapers; A Globe and Mail team for an immersive experience showcasing photographs that document how Canada and its allies are bracing for an unknown future wrought by climate change in the Arctic.

Project of the Year
Winner: Le Devoir for its efforts to document and investigate how COVID-19 affected almost every facet of life in Quebec in 2020.
Finalists: Gabrielle Duchaine and Caroline Touzin, La Presse, for investigating the explosion of child pornography on the Internet, and discovering how predators exchanged advice online about using the pandemic to increase exploitation and abuse of minors; The Toronto Star for reinventing its newsroom to offer readers a lifeline of information and guidance to help them cope with the worst health disaster Canada has ever faced.

Bob Levin Award for Short Feature
Winner: Erin Anderssen, Globe and Mail, for her moving account of a long-term care worker who offered comfort to COVID-stricken residents so that they didn’t have to spend their last moments alone.
Finalists: Louise Dickson, Victoria Times Colonist, for a heartbreaking story about a mother’s unrelenting efforts to save her opioid-addicted son; Ben Waldman, Winnipeg Free Press, for turning a focus on one family’s attempt to salvage the hockey season into a look at efforts across the city and country to maintain touchstones in a world turned upside down by COVID-19.

Sports
Winner: Michael Doyle, Globe and Mail, for exposing sexual, psychological and physical abuse and manipulation of elite athletes by the most powerful person in Canadian track and field.
Finalists: Cathal Kelly, Globe and Mail, for columns about the Brier curling championship, soccer legend Maradona and the banality of athlete interviews; Melissa Martin, Winnipeg Free Press, for “First Nations Voices, Canada’s Game,” a behind-the-scenes look at APTN’s Hometown Hockey in Cree TV broadcast.

Sports Photo
Winner: Leah Hennel, Globe and Mail, for a picture of an Olympic water polo athlete training in a makeshift pool made from hay bales and tarps.
Finalists: Jacques Boissinot, Canadian Press, for the image of a freestyle skier tumbling to earth after a jump went wrong; Frank Gunn, Canadian Press, for his photo of a collision between a Toronto Maple Leafs player and a Carolina Hurricanes goaltender.

Sustained News Coverage
Winner: The Globe and Mail for its coverage of the devastation inside Canada’s long-term care homes from the spread of COVID-19.
Finalsts: Aaron Beswick, Halifax Chronicle Herald, for providing context and analysis of the violence that unfolded on the water and on land in response to the Mi’kmaw’s push to pursue a fishery that would provide a moderate livelihood, as required by Supreme Court rulings; La Presse for its coverage of the crisis that emerged in Quebec’s long-term care accommodation centres from the spread of COVID-19.

Nominated entries can be viewed at the NNA website at www.nna-ccj.ca. The link to the nominated entries can be found on the right side of the home page, just below the photo of the 2019 Journalist of the Year (Randy Richmond of the London Free Press).

Our thanks to Cision for sponsoring this announcement.

SOURCE National Newspaper Awards

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An Amazon warehouse worker in Bessemer, Alabama, has died

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Union supporters gather outside of the Amazon BHM1 fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama, on March 29, 2021.
Union supporters gather outside of the Amazon BHM1 fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama, on March 29, 2021.

An Amazon worker died Thursday after collapsing at the company’s warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, Bloomberg reported.

The worker was found in a warehouse bathroom and taken to a hospital, according to Bloomberg.

“We’re deeply saddened by the passing of a member of our team, and our thoughts and deepest sympathies are with his loved ones during this difficult time,” Amazon told the publication.

Amazon’s Bessemer warehouse was recently the site of a high-profile campaign by workers seeking to unionize. Employees at the facility voted 1,798 to 738 against unionizing, with 505 ballots challenged and 76 ballots being voided.

However, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, under which the employees would have unionized, challenged the vote results, filing official objections with the National Labor Relations Board alleging Amazon illegally interfered with the vote.

The NLRB on Friday held a hearing to determine whether Amazon’s conduct during the campaign amounted to violations of labor law and whether to redo the election.

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Source: https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/amazon-warehouse-worker-dies-in-bessemer-alabama-report-2021-5-1030403957

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