Connect with us

Blockchain

How I Defeated the Cobo Vault Pro’s Self-Destruct Mechanism

Avatar

Published

on

Author profile picture

@nickjohnsonNick Johnson

Founder and Lead Developer at the Ethereum Name Service. Software Engineer and hacker of code and electronics.

Cobo recently offered to send me their Vault Pro, a hardware wallet focused on “see what you sign” security, which they’re presently adding Ethereum support to. They didn’t ask for anything in return, and I assume they expected I’d give it a try and maybe tweet about it.

Unfortunately, they sent it to someone who used to run a hobbyist electronics company, so I did a bit more than that.

Packaging and First Impressions

The Vault Pro comes nicely packaged and includes the Vault itself, a rechargeable battery (via USB-C, inconveniently placed so you can’t charge it while using it), a separate 4xAAA battery compartment, presumably for emergency use, and various instruction cards and quick-start guides.

The package has tamper-evident seals on it, but one of them had come unstuck in the post without leaving its “void” marks behind on the box, so I’m skeptical about how effective they are. Cobo tells me they’re looking into this, and improving their seals and their application for future batches.

The device seems solidly made, and the batteries clip-on satisfyingly with a magnetic clasp that also makes them easy to remove. As advertised, there are no communications ports, just a fingerprint reader and camera on the back. There’s also an SD-Card slot hidden under the battery compartment, which their site says is for firmware upgrades.

Setup and UX

The setup process will be familiar to anyone who’s owned a hardware wallet before. You’re asked to create a new wallet or import an existing one; in either case, there’s the familiar set of 24 mnemonic words to write down or enter. The touchscreen makes this much easier than the Ledger’s two-button interface, but the screen is just a bit small for the full keyboard to be fully comfortable. This is the case when entering passwords, too — I always had the feeling that I was going to fat-finger adjacent keys.

The Vault runs a cut-down version of Android, which seems a sensible choice given the capabilities of the hardware. There’s no home screen, though — just Cobo’s built-in application, which uses common UX patterns and so is pretty easy to get used to.

Ethereum Support

The big thing Cobo is working on at the moment — and likely the reason they sent this to me — is Ethereum support. They’ve supported Ether transfers for some time now, but are adding web3 integration, via a fork of MetaMask, and support for smart contracts.

Trying this out required me to download the latest firmware and flash it to the device using a MicroSD card, which was fairly straightforward. Cobo provides instructions on how to verify that the update package matches the sources published on GitHub for the APK (Android App) and secure element firmware, which I haven’t yet done — but it’s to their credit that this is something they support.

After updating and installing their fork of MetaMask in my browser, I’m able to configure a “read-only wallet” on the device, which gives me a QR code to scan in MetaMask. After doing so, my Vault account is displayed in MetaMask, and I can interact with web3 apps using it.

Signing is accomplished by MetaMask showing a QR code (or for longer transactions, an animated sequence of QR codes), which I scan with my Vault; then, once I’ve signed the transaction, the Vault shows a QR code with the signature, which I scan with MetaMask. I tested this out with the ENS app and it worked without issue, though most transactions are still just as opaque as they would be on Ledger, not showing the transaction payload:

For some transactions, it’s able to decode the payload and show it to the user; for example, this ERC20 transfer:

The Cobo folks tell me that they’re working on support for more ABIs, and support for users to load their own set of ABIs via SD card. They’re also considering options for including signed ABI data in the transaction QR codes, or other options for transaction transparency. They’re also working on getting their changes to MetaMask accepted into the main extension — which will be essential for making this work long-term.

One of the things Cobo advertises is transparent signing — you should be able to examine and decode the QR code data to check it’s doing what you think it is. Let’s try it. Here are the contents of the MetaMask-generated QR code for one of my signing requests:

UR:BYTES/TR0HKGN50PYX27PZ8G3XVWP5XUURQWP5XAJR2VRZXVEXXWPJV9SNJVEEXSERSVMPVCCXYV3CVVMRYCES8YEXXWFHXGMKVVT9V5CRJCESXF3KZD3JXAJKYDMXX5URQCF5VCCNGENRVF3NSCMPXQMX2WF5X56RJDNYXPSKYVNYX5MNJWF3XESNVWRX8YEXZDFKXGMKYVTZV93XZEPEVGMX2D338QUNSCEKV5CK2DFHXQCXZEP3XUENQVECXQURQG3VYFUXVUPZ8G3RSWZPXQ6Y2VPJYGKZY6RY2PSHG6PZ8G3X6TE5XSNJ7D3SYUHNQFE0XQHNQG3VYFEKJEMWF9JZYW3ZXSENVCNPXUURYGNARYSURL

Cobo uses an encoding of their own making called ‘UR encoding’, designed to make the most of a QR code’s text alphabet. Using their JS decoding library gives us this:

{ "txHex":"f8478084...", "xfp":"88A04E02", "hdPath":"m/44'/60'/0'/0/0", "signId":"436ba782"
}

‘xfp’ is the master key fingerprint from BIP-32. The rest is clear enough. Decoding the tx data with ether.js gives us:

{ "nonce": 0, "gasPrice: "0x7d50b32c" "gasLimit": "0xaa93", "to": "0x283Af0B28c62C092C9727F1Ee09c02CA627EB7F5", "value": "0x00", "data": "0xf14fcbc8ca06e945496d0ab2d579916a68f92a5627b1babad9b6e61898c6e1e5700ad173", "chainId":3
}

As expected, this is the data for the first transaction shown above.

After signing, the Vault generates:

UR:BYTES/TZN8KGNND9NKUCT5W4EX2G36YGEKYC3HX4NRSCE4X4JNZVP5XS6RJEFSXQMNYV34XESNJWP5XDJKVEPJXAJXYCEHV3JN2V3JXYCK2ETZVY6KXWRX8QCRJEPHXSEN2VF3XAJKXWPJV4JNJVNRVVCRXE33XP3XZC3C8PJRXEP3XE3NQEN9VVUNWDEKV43X2C3CVYUNYV34X3NRQWRXV5CRQVF4XQMXZEFNV33RGDEJVY3ZCGNND9NKUJTYYGAZYDPNXE3XZDECXG386TMVR2G

Which decodes to:

{ "signature":"3bb75f8c55e104449e0072256a9843efd27dbc7de52211eeba5c8f809d7435117ec82ee92cc03f10bab88d3d16c0fec9776ebeb8a92254f08fe001506ae3db472a", "signId":"436ba782"
}

Fairly straightforward, and seems to be doing what it says on the tin.

Security & Teardown

All of this is very interesting, but probably not why you’re reading this article. How secure is it, and what does it look like inside?

The Vault has attestation keys loaded onboard — meaning that the secure controller has a keypair that was loaded at the factory, enabling it to sign messages asserting that it’s a “real” Vault. The secure controller is designed to make it difficult to extract the attestation keys from the device, even destructively. If opening the device without detection is difficult, and replacing it with a lookalike is prevented by the attestation keys, you can be fairly sure that you receive a device, and it passes the authentication check, it’s secure.

Cobo makes a big deal of their physical security against supply-chain and evil maid attacks; they have articles and videos about its self-destruct mechanism, designed to wipe the secure microcontroller if anyone ever attempts to open the device. If effective, this means that you can be fairly certain that your device is intact when you receive it. How good is this security?

First, let’s take a look at the published materials. Their article says there’s a button battery powering the self-destruct, and that it uses a continuity sensor with the display to detect if it’s been opened. Fortunately, they are kind enough to publish partial schematics and BoM (Bill of Materials). Let’s see what we can learn from those.

Here’s the relevant part of their schematic — the detection circuit:

The pin on the left here labeled ‘DET0’ leads to the pad that connects across the back of the screen. In normal operation, that connection grounds DET0, but if it goes open-circuit because the screen has been removed, R1101 is a pull-up connected to the button-cell, which pulls that pin high, turning on Q1101, which in turn enables Q1102, allowing power to flow from the battery, through D1102 to the same power regulator normally powered by the rechargeable battery.

In other words, interfering with the tamper sensor will wake the device up. The “secure element” is also shown on the schematic, albeit without its true name and with a number of connections missing:

VCC5V, here, is the power supply generated from the backup battery (or the rechargeable one, in normal operation). An odd choice, since the rest of the schematic shows that the secure element uses 3.3v logic levels — why does it need a 5V supply? This 5V supply isn’t used anywhere else, though it may be used to power the 3.3v regulator; that part isn’t shown in the schematic provided.

A connection to DET0 isn’t shown, but we can safely assume (and the published firmware confirms) it’s connected to one of its general-purpose IO (GPIO) pins. The firmware also shows three other pins used as “passive” tamper sensors; these ones can’t wake the device up from sleep but can detect tampering of some kind while the device is active.

This is the point at which a ‘real’ adversary would have bought several Vaults, and would take one apart as a ‘sacrificial’ device so they can plan how to attack the others. I don’t have that luxury, so instead, I took my Vault to my local Veterinarian, and asked them to XRay it for me. They were happy to oblige, and gave me this:

Interesting! This definitely isn’t the device in the video and the photos from the article; in those photos, the PCB takes up the whole device, but in these, it’s only in the top part. Presumably, this is a newer version?

Here’s a closeup, where I’ve labeled the components we can decipher:

“PMIC” is the 5v power regulator. We can also see a number of “cans” — shielding enclosures used to cut down on RF interference or to make it more difficult to tamper with components. The 5v regulator appears to be under one, and there’s a couple of overlapping ones in the middle of the board — on opposite sides of the PCB, no doubt.

Since the X-Ray sees through everything, we’ve no way of knowing which side the battery is on — we can only hope it’s the outside, not the side facing the screen. We can clearly see the wires from it come down to the bottom left corner where they connect to a pair of pads, though, which gives us all we need.

A little work with a Dremel and we have a hole in the back, through which we can see the wires, just where they should be:

(Sorry for the poor image quality; I haven’t managed to locate the camera adaptor for my microscope since I moved house.)

A check with the multimeter confirms this is the backup battery wiring. After snipping the red wire, we can take the screen off and be fairly sure that it can’t trigger any kind of tamper detection. A little work with a heat gun, some prying tools, and some IPA, and presto:

There’s some sort of cover protecting the electronics. Removing it reveals how the tamper sensor operates on this version of the device:

Two pads at the edge of the PCB are each divided in half, and two pieces of conductive fabric on the cover contact them, bridging them. Removing the cover will break the circuit.

After putting a blob of solder on each to defeat the tamper sensor, and reconnecting the battery, we can boot it up again and see if we’ve been as clever as we think we have. Will it notice that its guts are spewed out in front of it, or will it think everything is still okay?

Success! It hasn’t detected our tampering and boots up without warnings or errors, ready to sign transactions.

Now, if I were an Evil Maid, or someone conducting a supply chain attack, this is what I’d do next:

  1. Find the boot mode selection pins for the main processor and change them to boot from an external device. If I can’t do that, just replace the EMMC chip with one of my own.
  2. Load an alternate Android firmware with a modified copy of the Vault app. This app can behave as normal, except when signing certain transactions of my choosing — in which case it will show the user an innocent description that matches what they expect but actually sign my malicious transaction. Alternately, for a supply-chain attack, modify it to always generate one of a few key pairs I control — meaning that I already know what account my target will ‘generate’ before they receive their device.
  3. Take a second Vault and remove all the components from it — no need to worry about the tamper sensor here. Put my modified Vault inside the sacrificial Vault’s pristine case, and send it on to my victim.

So, what could Cobo do better? This is difficult; realistically, a sufficiently well resourced and determined attacker will always win, if they have their hands on your hardware.

One option would be to put the battery on the side of the PCB facing the screen. This would require a substantial redesign, but make it a lot harder to clip the wires.

A much more comprehensive solution would be to connect the battery directly to the secure MCU. Many MCUs support backup batteries for this purpose, and some deliberately store keys in volatile memory that is wiped if power is cut. This would be a “hardcore” option that puts a strict limit on the lifetime of the device but would make an attacker’s life a lot harder. With the MCU powered 24/7, other tamper protections can be used — for example, a thermometer can detect attempts to desolder components. Any attacker would be forced to try and compromise the device while it’s powered, and without using heat.

If a rechargeable button cell was used, this could be charged from the main battery when it’s available — so rather than dying after 3 years or so, you’d merely have to use it about that often to keep it alive.

Teardown

I’m not engaging in a supply chain attack, but I am interested in what’s inside, so let’s have a closer look at the PCB. This is the point where we give up on booting this device again, and I start taking things apart.

As expected from the X-Ray, the bulk of the PCB is protected by a can. A smaller one protects the 5v regulator — likely to reduce the RF interference it emits. Let’s unclip the main can and take a look underneath:

Mostly this is as expected from the published schematics. There’s the Mediatek MT6850 System-on-Chip, and a Kingston part that combines eMMC and SDRAM, along with various support components. In the top left is the secure microcontroller — but its identifying marks have been lasered off! They really are determined for us not to know what this is.

This seems a bit odd, to be honest — secure MCU manufacturers typically require NDAs to access their datasheets and tooling, so it’s no surprise they can’t tell us a lot about it, but the manufacturer generally won’t forbid you from revealing what part you’re using. If they did, all they would have to do is not label them in the first place. It also contrasts with Cobo’s generally open-source approach to the rest of their platform.

Let’s see what we can figure out what it might be. We can figure out a fair bit about it:

  • It’s a 5x5mm QFN40.
  • It’s some kind of “secure microcontroller”.
  • It uses a 12MHz main crystal.
  • It uses 3.3v logic for its IOs but accepts (or at least tolerates) 5V on what appears to be a supply pin.
  • We know from the build files that it’s an Arm Cortex M0.
  • We know from the firmware that it has hardware-level ECDSA, RSA, and RNG support.

Searching common supplier databases, there are not many hits for this criteria. Our best match is the MAX36010-BNS-T, a “security supervisor” from Maxim. It meets most of our criteria, but it’s unclear if it even includes a programmable MCU (much less an Arm Cortex M0), or whether it has circuitry to support a 5v supply. On the other hand, it’s got built-in tamper detection and support for all the algorithms we know the firmware uses, and it’s the right form-factor, which makes it our best candidate.

The back of the board is fairly straightforward. It has the expected battery and pager motor, the SD card slot, as well as yet another can:

Under the can is nothing particularly exciting: the power circuitry for the main CPU.

Next Steps

The next steps in a serious security analysis of this device would be to start taking apart relevant parts of the circuit, measuring them, and tracing nets on the PCB, to construct a schematic we can compare to the published one to identify the unknown parts of it — particularly the tamper detection circuits that are unpublished. I can speculate about what those are, but I don’t think it would be terribly difficult for a determined adversary with similar resources to me to identify and bypass them — especially since the device is inactive in this state, and the pins of the secure MCU can be exposed and traces cut or pins strapped to VCC or GND as required.

Conclusion

Despite the ease with which I was able to bypass its tamper-detection circuitry, the Cobo Vault Pro seems well designed in both hardware and software. The fact it has protections against supply-chain and evil-maid attacks puts it a step above most of its competition, and raises the bar for such attacks — but there is certainly room for improvement in that area to reach the levels of security it aspires to. By more clearly targeting frequent users who want the highest level of protection — and are prepared to deal with the inconvenience that brings — they could produce a device that stands head-and-shoulders above the current competition.

I’m a little skeptical of the security value of using QR codes for the transmission of data. Still, the UX is good — no messing with getting USB devices working — and if they succeed in getting their changes to MetaMask merged, or otherwise add support for web3 apps via a solution such as WalletConnect, this device will be a viable alternative to the Ledger and Trezor, with a much nicer UI that seems likely to be further improved.

This is a shame because the one I have appears to be non-functional and in pieces.

Also published at https://weka.medium.com/defeating-the-cobo-vault-pros-self-destruct-mechanism-abf321e2f5b5

Author profile picture

Read my stories

Founder and Lead Developer at the Ethereum Name Service. Software Engineer and hacker of code and electronics.

Tags

Join Hacker Noon

Create your free account to unlock your custom reading experience.

Checkout PrimeXBT
Trade with the Official CFD Partners of AC Milan
The Easiest Way to Way To Trade Crypto.
Source: https://hackernoon.com/how-i-defeated-the-cobo-vault-pros-self-destruct-mechanism-4k4b35iu?source=rss

Blockchain

15. BNB Burn: Binance zerstört Coins im Wert von 600 Mio. USD

Avatar

Published

on

Die weltweit führende Krypto-Börse Binance hat den 15. BNB-Burn abgeschlossen und mit fast 600 Millionen Dollar einen Rekord aufgestellt. Der Gesamtbestand an BNB ist damit auf 169.432.937 gesunken.

Binance verkündete heute, am 16. April 2021, auf der Binance-Webseite, dass beim 15. vierteljährlichen (Januar bis März 2021) Binance Coin-Burn Münzen im Wert von rund 595,3 Millionen US-Dollar verbrannt wurden. Die Anzahl der zerstörten Token beläuft sich auf 1.099.888 BNB. Mit diesem aktuellen Burn ist der Gesamtbestand an BNB offiziell von 170.532.825 BNB auf 169.432.937 BNB gesunken.

Binance Coin Burn: Klein, aber bedeutend

Interessanterweise ist dieser BNB-Burn bezogen auf die Anzahl an zerstörten Coins der viertkleinste Burn. Der diesmalige Binance Coin-Burn ist deutlich kleiner als der letzte BNB-Burn (3.619888 BNB zerstört beim letzten Burn). Gemessen am Wert in US-Dollar ist dieser 15. BNB Burn allerdings der bisher größte.

Binance-CEO Changpeng Zhao kommentierte den 15. BNB-Burn folgendermaßen auf dem Twitter-Account des Unternehmens:

Binance will Angebot von BNB Token auf 100 Millionen senken

Die beliebte Kryptobörse hatte bereits in der Vergangenheit angekündigt, BNB im Wert von einem bestimmten Prozentsatz der vierteljährlichen Gewinne zu kaufen und zu zerstören. Das soll das Angebot von Token zukünftig auf eine Anzahl von 100 Millionen senken.

Im Januar 2021 verkündete Binance, dass eine Beschleunigung des BNB Burns geplant ist, der eigentlich für 27 Jahre angesetzt war. Dies kommentierte Changpeng Zhao folgendermaßen:

„Bei der derzeitigen beschleunigten Verbrennung würde es etwa fünf bis acht Jahre dauern, bis die 100 Millionen BNB erreicht sind. Aber eine Reihe von Faktoren könnte den beschleunigten Verlauf in der Zukunft beeinflussen, einschließlich BNB-Preisschwankungen, allgemeine Marktbedingungen und mehr.“

Der Binance Coin (BNB) ist aktuell (Stand: 16. April 2021 um 18:00 Uhr CET) mit einem Wert von 514,45 US-Dollar die Kryptowährung mit der schlechtesten Performance unter den großen Kryptowährungen.

Binance Coin: Ein Bild von BeInCrypto.com
Binance Coin: Ein Bild von BeInCrypto.com

Was ist ein Token Burn?

Ein Token Burn ist ein einzigartiges Konzept für Kryptowährungen: Durch das Verbrennen einer bestimmten Anzahl von Token im Umlauf erwarten die Initiatoren eines Token Burns, den Wert der verbleibenden Coins zu erhöhen. Es folgt dem einfachen Prinzip von Angebot und Nachfrage. Wenn die Anzahl der Münzen sinkt und der Bedarf an ihnen gleich bleibt oder wächst, sollte es (aber es ist nicht zu 100% garantiert) Kursgewinne geben. Die verbreitetste Art der Münzenverbrennung ist die Versendung an eine sogenannte Brenneradresse – eine öffentliche On-Chain-Wallet, deren private Schlüssel nachweislich ungültig und nicht erhältlich sind.

Haftungsausschluss

Alle auf unserer Website enthaltenen Informationen werden nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen recherchiert. Die journalistischen Beiträge dienen nur allgemeinen Informationszwecken. Jede Handlung, die der Leser aufgrund der auf unserer Website gefundenen Informationen vornimmt, geschieht ausschließlich auf eigenes Risiko.

Share Article

Verena hat ihren Bachelor in BWL und Sozialwissenschaften an der Uni Köln sowie einen Master in Business Management an der Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona absolviert. Als Marketing und Content Spezialistin hat sie in den letzten Jahren in Ländern auf der ganzen Welt gelebt. Sie hat eine besondere Leidenschaft für Technologie und Innovation.

MEHR ÜBER DEN AUTOR

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://de.beincrypto.com/15-bnb-burn-binance-zerstoert-coins-im-wert-von-600-mio-usd/

Continue Reading

Blockchain

NSA-Whistleblower Edward Snowden versteigert seinen ersten NFT „Stay Free“

Avatar

Published

on

Edward Snowden war Mitarbeiter der der Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Nachdem Snowden hochklassifizierte Informationen von der National Security Agency (NSA) öffentlich zugänglich gemacht hatte, floh er vor den rechtlichen Konsequenzen dessen und hat mittlerweile eine dauerhafte Aufenthaltsgenehmigung in Russland.

Anfang 2016 wurde Snowden Präsident der Freedom of the Press Foundation, einer in San Francisco ansässigen gemeinnützigen Organisation. Ziel der Freedom of the Press Foundation ist der Schutz von Journalisten vor staatlicher Überwachung. Denn die von Snowden öffentlich gemachten hochklassifizierten Informationen der NSA belegen zahlreiche globale Überwachungsprogramme. In Zusammenarbeit sollen NSA, die Five Eyes Intelligence Alliance, europäische Regierungen und internationale Telekommunikationsunternehmen Menschen überwachen.

Snowden versteigert NFT „Stay Free“

Im Zuge seiner Arbeit für die Freedom of the Press Foundation versteigert Snowden nun seinen ersten NFT (non fungible token). Bei dem NFT handelt es sich um eine tokenisierte Kopie eines Gerichtsurteils über das Massenüberwachungsprogramm der NSA. Snoden plant den Erlös der Auktion gänzlich an die Freedom of the Press Foundation zu spenden. Zum Zeitpunkt des Verfassens des Artikels liegt das Höchstgebot für den NFT „Stay Free“ bei 200 ETH, also fast 480.000 US-Dollar.

Auf Twitter erläutert Snowden:

„Ich habe ein einzigartiges #NFT für wohltätige Zwecke gespendet, um die Verteidigung von Journalisten und Whistleblowern zu unterstützen. Wenn Sie an Porträts interessiert sind, die aus historischen Rechtsgutachten stammen, oder einfach nur die Sache unterstützen möchten, nehmen Sie heute um 15 Uhr ET an der Versteigerung teil.“

Geschichte auf der Blockchain verewigen

Als NFT ist die Kopie des Gerichtsurteils über Snowden nun auf der Blockchain verewigt. Immer mehr Menschen nutzen die NFT-Technologie, um wichtige Ereignisse in Form von Videos oder Bildern für die Nachwelt auf der Blockchain zu speichern. Die Technologie gibt durch ihre zensurresistente und robuste Basis die Grundlage für derartige Visionen.

In der Beschreibung des NFTs „Stay Free“ lesen wir:

„Dieses einzigartige, signierte Werk kombiniert die Gesamtheit einer wegweisenden Gerichtsentscheidung, mit der entschieden wird, dass die Massenüberwachung der Nationalen Sicherheitsagentur gegen das Gesetz verstößt, mit dem ikonischen Porträt des Whistleblowers von Platon (mit Genehmigung verwendet). Es ist das einzige bekannte NFT, das von Snowden erstellt wurde.“

Den „Stay Free“ NFT gibt es nur ein einziges Mal. Der Höchstbietende erhält also ein Unikat und zugleich den Nachweis für ein Stück Geschichte. Trevor Timm, Exekutivdirektor der Freedom of the Press Foundation, erklärt, wie der Erlös verwendet werden soll:

„Wir freuen uns sehr, den Erlös dieser Auktion für die Weiterentwicklung und Verbesserung von Technologien zu verwenden, die Journalisten und ihre Quellen schützen können, wie SecureDrop, unser Open-Source-Whistleblower-Einreichungssystem.“

Edward Snowden: Ein Bild von BeInCryto.com
Edward Snowden: Ein Bild von BeInCryto.com

Haftungsausschluss

Alle auf unserer Website enthaltenen Informationen werden nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen recherchiert. Die journalistischen Beiträge dienen nur allgemeinen Informationszwecken. Jede Handlung, die der Leser aufgrund der auf unserer Website gefundenen Informationen vornimmt, geschieht ausschließlich auf eigenes Risiko.

Share Article

Alex hat ihren Bachelor in Orient- und Asienwissenschaften an der Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn absolviert, danach Deutsch als Fremdsprache am Goethe Institut studiert und ihren Master in Arabistik an der Freien Universität Berlin absolviert. Seit 2017 ist sie als Krypto-Journalistin tätig.

MEHR ÜBER DEN AUTOR

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://de.beincrypto.com/nsa-whistleblower-edward-snowden-versteigert-seinen-ersten-nft-stay-free/

Continue Reading

Blockchain

Türkei verbietet Krypto-Zahlungen ab Ende April

Avatar

Published

on

Die türkische Zentralbank gab in einem Rundschreiben im Resmî Gazete am 16. April 2021 ein Verbot für die Verwendung von Kryptowährungen als Zahlungsinstrumente an. Kryptowährungen und andere digitale Vermögenswerte, die auf der Distributed Ledger-Technologie basieren, dürfen nun weder direkt noch indirekt als Zahlungsmittel verwendet werden.

Allerdings ist das Kaufen, Verkaufen und Halten der Kryptowährungen nach wie vor nicht ausdrücklich verboten. Gleichzeitig weist die türkische Zentralbank im Rundschreiben konkret darauf hin, dass türkische Unternehmen sich nicht im Krypto-Sektor ausbreiten dürfen:

„Zahlungsdienstleister dürfen Geschäftsmodelle nicht so entwickeln, dass Krypto-Assets direkt oder indirekt für die Bereitstellung von Zahlungsdiensten und die Ausgabe von E-Geld verwendet werden, und können keine Dienstleistungen im Zusammenhang mit solchen Geschäftsmodellen erbringen.“

Interesse an Krypto in der Türkei groß

Wie BeInCrypto bereits berichtete, stieg das Interesse der türkischen Bevölkerung an Bitcoin extrem. Die Zahl der Google Suchanfragen nach Bitcoin stieg in der Türkei exponentiell an. Vermutlich basiert dieses Interesse nicht allein auf dem Wachstum der Krypto-Preise, sondern auch auf den ökonomischen Unsicherheiten in der Region und der zunehmenden Abwertung der Lira. Die Inflationsrate der Lira liegt mit 16,19 Prozent auf einem Sechsmonatshoch. Ferner liegt die Arbeitslosenquote bei 13,4 Prozent.

Im März ersetzte der türkische Präsident Erdoğan den Zentralbankchef Naci Ağbal. Die Veränderung innerhalb der Zentralbank zeigen nun erste Auswirkungen für die Krypto-Nutzer. Ab dem 30. April 2021 gilt das neue Krypto-Nutzungsverbot in der Türkei.

Allerdings gaben Bitci Technology und McLaren Racing erst im März eine Partnerschaft bekannt, bei der es um ein spezielles Token-Projekt für das McLaren Formel-1-Team geht. Ferner gab Royal Motors, das Rolls-Royce- und Lotus-Autos in der Türkei vertreibt, kürzlich bekannt, Zahlungen in Kryptowährungen zu akzeptieren.

Ein Bild von BeInCrypto.com
Ein Bild von BeInCrypto.com

Türkei verstärkt Krypto-Kontrolle

In den letzten Monaten verstärkte die Türkei bereits ihren regulatorischen Einfluss auf Kryptowährungen. So forderten die Finanzbehörden Anfang April beispielsweise, dass Krypto-Börsen Kundeninformationen preisgeben sollten. Die Finanzbehörden möchten so kriminelle Tätigkeiten via Kryptowährungen erschweren oder sogar verhindern.

Gleichzeitig äußerte sich der neue Chef der Zentralbank Şahap Kavcıoğlu äußerst kritisch zu den Entscheidungen seines Vorgängers. Beispielsweise kritisierte er die Entscheidung der Zentralbank die Zinssätze in der Türkei zu erhöhen. Dies habe einen negativen Einfluss für die Nutzer der Lira. Ziel der Erhöhung der Zinsen um zwei Prozent auf 19 Prozent war die Stärkung der Lira und darauffolgende günstige Importe.

Erdoğan zeigte sich jedoch als Gegner der hohen Zinsen und als Befürworter für günstige Kredite. Nun bleibt abzuwarten, ob die Politik des neuen Zentralbankchefs Erdoğan besser gefällt und ob das neuste Krypto-Bezahlverbot der Wirtschaft guttun wird.

Haftungsausschluss

Alle auf unserer Website enthaltenen Informationen werden nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen recherchiert. Die journalistischen Beiträge dienen nur allgemeinen Informationszwecken. Jede Handlung, die der Leser aufgrund der auf unserer Website gefundenen Informationen vornimmt, geschieht ausschließlich auf eigenes Risiko.

Share Article

Alex hat ihren Bachelor in Orient- und Asienwissenschaften an der Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn absolviert, danach Deutsch als Fremdsprache am Goethe Institut studiert und ihren Master in Arabistik an der Freien Universität Berlin absolviert. Seit 2017 ist sie als Krypto-Journalistin tätig.

MEHR ÜBER DEN AUTOR

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://de.beincrypto.com/tuerkei-verbietet-krypto-zahlungen-ab-ende-april/

Continue Reading

Blockchain

Rothschild Investment investiert 4,75 Millionen USD in Ethereum

Avatar

Published

on

Rothschild Investment Grayscale Ethereum Trust Shares im Wert von 4,75 Millionen US-Dollar gekauft. Außerdem hat Rothschild Investment bereits im ersten Quartal von 2021 8000 Anteile des Grayscale BTC Trust erworben.

Laut dem SEC Filling hat Rothschild Investment 4,75 Milliarden US-Dollar in Ethereum über den Grayscale ETH Trust investiert. Interessanterweise besitzt die Firma zudem insgesamt 38364 Anteile des Grayscale Bitcoin Trust.

Rothschild Investment ist eine der größten Asset-Management-Firmen auf dem Markt. Sie verwaltet Assets im Wert von über 1,1 Milliarden US-Dollar. Die Firma investierte diesmal zum ersten Mal in ETH.

Ethereum Preis : TradingView

Der Ethereum Kurs konnte in den letzten Wochen aufgrund des Wachstums der DeFi- und NFT-Branche eine gute Performance hinlegen. Am 15. April 2021 erreichte der Ethereum Preis ein neues Allzeithoch bei über 2500 US-Dollar.

Die Investitionen von MicroStrategy und Square lösten letztes Jahr eine Art Dominoeffekt aus. Immer mehr (institutionelle) Investoren sind auf den Markt gekommen. Diese Entwicklung haben den Kryptomarkt weiteres Wachstum ermöglicht und das Image der Kryptowährungen aufgewertet.

Wird ETH 2.0 zu weiteren ETH Kurssteigerungen führen?

Ethereum möchte innerhalb der nächsten zwei Jahre nach und nach einige Updates lancieren. Am 1. Dezember 2020 kam bereits die Beacon Chain für Ethereum 2.0 auf den Markt. Seitdem ist die Zahl der in den Ethereum 2.0 Staking-Contract eingezahlten ETH förmlich explodiert. Sogar der Schöpfer von Ethereum selbst, Vitalik Buterin, zahlte eine beachtliche Summe in den Contract ein.

Mit ETH 2.0 soll durch das Sharding und durch den Proof-of-Stake-Mechanismus die Skalierbarkeit, die Effizient und die Kostenstruktur des Netzwerks optimiert werden. Da die hohen Transaktionsgebühren bis jetzt ein großes Problem für das Netzwerk darstellen, werden die neuen Upgrades und Skalierungsmöglichkeiten wohl noch weitere Investoren anziehen.

Die anstehenden Veränderungen scheinen den Optimismus des Marktes weiter angeheizt zu haben. Die Verbesserung des Ethereum-Netzwerks und der immer größer werdende NFT-und DeFi-Sektor könnten dazu führen, dass Ethereum seine Position auf dem Markt noch weiter ausbauen wird.

Ethereum Aufstieg BeInCrypto DeFi
Ethereum Aufstieg BeInCrypto

Übersetzt von Maximilian M.

Haftungsausschluss

Alle auf unserer Website enthaltenen Informationen werden nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen recherchiert. Die journalistischen Beiträge dienen nur allgemeinen Informationszwecken. Jede Handlung, die der Leser aufgrund der auf unserer Website gefundenen Informationen vornimmt, geschieht ausschließlich auf eigenes Risiko.

Share Article

Rahul Nambiampurath is an India-based Digital Marketer who got attracted to Bitcoin and the blockchain in 2014. Ever since, he’s been an active member of the community. He has a Masters degree in Finance. <a href=”mailto:editorinchief@beincrypto.com”>Email me!</a>

MEHR ÜBER DEN AUTOR

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://de.beincrypto.com/rothschild-investment-investiert-475-millionen-usd-in-ethereum/

Continue Reading
Blockchain2 hours ago

15. BNB Burn: Binance zerstört Coins im Wert von 600 Mio. USD

Esports5 hours ago

Overwatch League 2021 Day 1 Recap

Esports6 hours ago

C9 White Keiti Blackmail Scandal Explains Sudden Dismissal

Esports7 hours ago

LoL gameplay design director pulled, transferred to Riot’s MMO

Esports7 hours ago

How to counter Renekton in League of Legends

Esports8 hours ago

3 big reasons why Dota 2’s new hero Dawnbreaker is just bad

Esports8 hours ago

Call of Duty League Stage 3 Home Series Details

Esports8 hours ago

Valorant Mouse Guide: Find The Right DPI For You

Esports8 hours ago

Havok Rejoins Florida Mutineers Starting Roster

Esports9 hours ago

Sources: floppy to replace Relyks on Cloud9 Blue’s VALORANT team

Esports9 hours ago

What is Booba.tv? New site spotlights sex appeal on Twitch

Esports9 hours ago

OpTic Pros Claim Toronto Ultra has “Unfair” Advantage in CDL

Esports9 hours ago

Bungie’s Next Game Will Reportedly Be Esports Ready

Esports9 hours ago

FFXIV on PS5 Review: Absolutely Worth Giving a Shot

Esports9 hours ago

Levi’s Finds Partnership With NRG Esports is a Good Fit

Esports10 hours ago

Lakeland University Partners With Bucks Gaming for the 2021 NBA 2K League Season

Esports10 hours ago

KylieBitkin banned from NoPixel GTA server after xQc drama

Esports10 hours ago

Rainbow Six Siege FPL Expands into Latin America

Esports10 hours ago

Gamers Club and Riot Games Organize Women’s Valorant Circuit in Latin America

Esports11 hours ago

How to play League of Legends’ newest champion Gwen

Esports11 hours ago

Tarik steps down from Evil Geniuses, addresses Valo

Esports11 hours ago

FIFA 21: How to vote for the Team of the Season

Esports11 hours ago

MTG Arena Strixhaven Standard Decks to Try

Esports11 hours ago

Call of Duty League Stage 3 Groups Revealed

Esports12 hours ago

Fortnite Balance Changes and Weapon Update – April 15

Esports12 hours ago

Fortnite: DreamHack Postpones Open Duos Tournament For “Integrity Concerns”

Esports12 hours ago

Fortnite Season 6 Week 5 Challenges: Off-Road Tires, More

Esports12 hours ago

Deathstroke To Get A Fortnite Skin In Future Update

Esports12 hours ago

Astralis Responds to Promisq Telling People to Get Cancer

Esports13 hours ago

EG Replaces Tarik With Michu in CSGO

Trending