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Green Technology: What the Ideal Green Economy Looks Like

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Imagine an economy where no person is left behind. Where equal opportunities are available to all. And where an increasing number of people get to experience the power of receiving a living wage. This is more than possible if members of society band together to place more focus on creating green jobs. Let’s take a look at what our new economy should look like following the coronavirus pandemic to create more opportunities for all.

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Ideally, the aim of the new economy should be on reducing environmental hazards stemming from climate change and air pollution. In addition, efforts should be made to invest in sectors that can pave the way for an expanded and sustainable green economy. These are steps that both community and elected leaders can take together to drive positive, eco-friendly economic change.

For example, leaders could invest billions of dollars in electrifying homes, vehicles, and ports. They could even push for a transit system that is fully electric yet reliable and affordable. Likewise, plans should focus on setting bold objectives for community solar, offshore wind, and energy storage.

In addition, leaders could create local union green jobs that provide fair wages for sustaining middle-class lifestyles. And these jobs should not be outsourced. Furthermore, investment in park management and in the remediation of lead pipes is essential. Leaders should also promote investment in the installation of green infrastructure that will help to protect against the stormwater runoff pollution and flooding brought about by climate change.

All in all, greater focus on green technology and green jobs from the top down can help to enhance people’s overall quality of life in the years ahead.

Source: https://usgreentechnology.com/green-technology-what-the-ideal-green-economy-looks-like/

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Water recycling technology delivers cash savings

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5B_0514
SDS Greywater Reuse System.

A next-generation water recycling system, unveiled by water infrastructure systems specialist SDS, will seemingly boost business sector efforts to save water by offering significantly improved investment returns for commercial developers and operators.

The SDS Greywater on Demand (GWOD) system uses “a state-of-the-art ultrafiltration technology, unique to the UK, together with smart controls, to deliver a space-saving, low-energy and responsive water reuse system, for commercial buildings, hotels and leisure centres.”

The SDS GWOD is set to be a flagship technology of the company’s water reuse product range. It is also one of the first to be equipped with SDS’s SYMBiotICTM automated smart controls incorporating cloud-based monitoring to ensure that process performance is optimised.

SDS says the GWOD’s small footprint, together with its ability to provide, on-demand, quality recycled water whenever needed, makes it capable of significantly improved investment payback when compared to conventional Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) greywater systems, especially for larger-scale systems, SDS water recycling specialist Kevin Reed explains:

“In the past, MBR systems have tended to be the technology of choice. Our ultrafiltration system typically processes water at about 2m3 per hour per filter, compared to an MBR system which processes at about 4m3 per day per membrane. As a result of the faster treatment, the storage volume, and therefore the tank size, is considerably smaller than for a typical MBR system.

“Using ultrafiltration also makes the system responsive to demand at peak times. Unlike MBR, our system does not depend on having to build up a biomass of bacteria for peak operation. High quality water is available immediately on start up. This also means that the system can be shut down when not in use, for example in an office block at weekends or holidays. In this way the system saves energy, too.”

The SDS Greywater on Demand system can pay back in as little as seven years, says the firm, although actual return on investment will depend on the size of the system and the local Water Company charges. SDS offers a full design and installation service to support Public Health Engineers, developers and commercial operators and ensure correct system sizing for maximum savings.

table

In the GWOD system, greywater is collected and then pumped through a disk pre-filter system and dosed with a small amount of chlorine before entering the ultrafilters. The treated water is then stored, ready for use, in a separate tank and pumped, as needed, around the building.

The GWOD’s ultrafiltration system is described as a highly-efficient membrane with automated integral backwash, that delivers treated water to near drinking water standards. The compact design can be adapted to add as many ultrafilters as required to deliver the amount of recycled water needed to service the building.

Disinfection-system-installed-at-a-facility-owned-by-South-East-Water
The SDS GWR system example hotel application.

When combined with SDS’s smart SYMBiotICTM cloud-based data monitoring and control, SDS GWOD can be configured to provide real-time performance measures, condition monitoring with alarms and alerts, as well as trend mapping to aid with preventative maintenance. Regular reports of water saving performance can also be output.

Greywater is wastewater, for example, from baths, showers and handbasins, that can be filtered, treated and then reused for non-drinking purposes such as toilet flushing, laundry or garden irrigation. The principle is already being widely adopted, especially by hotels and large office blocks. In London, where planning laws encourage water recycling, up to 20% of new buildings include greywater reuse systems.

Reed continues:
“With the impact of climate change, increased periods of drought and water stress are predicted. So, it will be imperative for sustainable buildings to adapt and install water saving measures as standard. Up to 60% of the water used in commercial buildings, such as office blocks or hotels, is highly-treated drinking water that is used, wastefully, to flush toilets or irrigate gardens, where the level of treatment is simply not needed. More cost-efficient reuse of water will benefit water companies by decreasing the demand on an already stressed supply network.”

“Any technology must first demonstrate it is commercially viable, before its environmental benefits can be exploited. New technologies like ultrafiltration and smart controls can lead the change, by making water reuse systems more accessible and attractive commercially.”

The launch of the SDS Greywater on Demand system follows on from the company’s acquisition of the water recycling business of Waterscan in 2019.

For more information visit www.sdslimited.com.

The post Water recycling technology delivers cash savings first appeared on Envirotec. Source: https://envirotecmagazine.com/2021/02/26/water-recycling-technology-delivers-cash-savings/

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Water recycling technology delivers cash savings

Avatar

Published

on

5B_0514
SDS Greywater Reuse System.

A next-generation water recycling system, unveiled by water infrastructure systems specialist SDS, will seemingly boost business sector efforts to save water by offering significantly improved investment returns for commercial developers and operators.

The SDS Greywater on Demand (GWOD) system uses “a state-of-the-art ultrafiltration technology, unique to the UK, together with smart controls, to deliver a space-saving, low-energy and responsive water reuse system, for commercial buildings, hotels and leisure centres.”

The SDS GWOD is set to be a flagship technology of the company’s water reuse product range. It is also one of the first to be equipped with SDS’s SYMBiotICTM automated smart controls incorporating cloud-based monitoring to ensure that process performance is optimised.

SDS says the GWOD’s small footprint, together with its ability to provide, on-demand, quality recycled water whenever needed, makes it capable of significantly improved investment payback when compared to conventional Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) greywater systems, especially for larger-scale systems, SDS water recycling specialist Kevin Reed explains:

“In the past, MBR systems have tended to be the technology of choice. Our ultrafiltration system typically processes water at about 2m3 per hour per filter, compared to an MBR system which processes at about 4m3 per day per membrane. As a result of the faster treatment, the storage volume, and therefore the tank size, is considerably smaller than for a typical MBR system.

“Using ultrafiltration also makes the system responsive to demand at peak times. Unlike MBR, our system does not depend on having to build up a biomass of bacteria for peak operation. High quality water is available immediately on start up. This also means that the system can be shut down when not in use, for example in an office block at weekends or holidays. In this way the system saves energy, too.”

The SDS Greywater on Demand system can pay back in as little as seven years, says the firm, although actual return on investment will depend on the size of the system and the local Water Company charges. SDS offers a full design and installation service to support Public Health Engineers, developers and commercial operators and ensure correct system sizing for maximum savings.

table

In the GWOD system, greywater is collected and then pumped through a disk pre-filter system and dosed with a small amount of chlorine before entering the ultrafilters. The treated water is then stored, ready for use, in a separate tank and pumped, as needed, around the building.

The GWOD’s ultrafiltration system is described as a highly-efficient membrane with automated integral backwash, that delivers treated water to near drinking water standards. The compact design can be adapted to add as many ultrafilters as required to deliver the amount of recycled water needed to service the building.

Disinfection-system-installed-at-a-facility-owned-by-South-East-Water
The SDS GWR system example hotel application.

When combined with SDS’s smart SYMBiotICTM cloud-based data monitoring and control, SDS GWOD can be configured to provide real-time performance measures, condition monitoring with alarms and alerts, as well as trend mapping to aid with preventative maintenance. Regular reports of water saving performance can also be output.

Greywater is wastewater, for example, from baths, showers and handbasins, that can be filtered, treated and then reused for non-drinking purposes such as toilet flushing, laundry or garden irrigation. The principle is already being widely adopted, especially by hotels and large office blocks. In London, where planning laws encourage water recycling, up to 20% of new buildings include greywater reuse systems.

Reed continues:
“With the impact of climate change, increased periods of drought and water stress are predicted. So, it will be imperative for sustainable buildings to adapt and install water saving measures as standard. Up to 60% of the water used in commercial buildings, such as office blocks or hotels, is highly-treated drinking water that is used, wastefully, to flush toilets or irrigate gardens, where the level of treatment is simply not needed. More cost-efficient reuse of water will benefit water companies by decreasing the demand on an already stressed supply network.”

“Any technology must first demonstrate it is commercially viable, before its environmental benefits can be exploited. New technologies like ultrafiltration and smart controls can lead the change, by making water reuse systems more accessible and attractive commercially.”

The launch of the SDS Greywater on Demand system follows on from the company’s acquisition of the water recycling business of Waterscan in 2019.

For more information visit www.sdslimited.com.

The post Water recycling technology delivers cash savings first appeared on Envirotec. Source: https://envirotecmagazine.com/2021/02/26/water-recycling-technology-delivers-cash-savings/

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California city protects bus drivers from COVID-19 by installing air cleaning technology

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City of Turlock installs air cleaning devices in entire bus fleet

The city of Turlock will become the first in California to install air cleaning devices across its entire operational bus fleet, in an effort to protect drivers from the risk of airborne transmission of coronavirus.

Turlock Transit, the city’s transit agency, plans to install 20 of the AirBubbl air cleaning devices in the driver cabins of its buses by the end of the month, including eight devices which are already installed. Provided by London-based firm AirLabs, the AirBubbl is said to remove more than 95% of airborne viruses and contaminated particulate matter. It also floods the driver area with over 30,000 litres of clean air every hour, creating a clean air breathing zone for the driver.

California is reported to be one of the US regions hit hardest by coronavirus, with more than 30,000 registered deaths and more than 2.7M registered cases since the beginning of the pandemic. The high level of coronavirus in the region is putting hospitals in the state under immense pressure, with 88.2% of intensive care beds occupied in the seven-day period from the start of January.

The AirBubbl is equally effective at removing air pollution, including harmful ozone gases, nitrogen dioxide (NOx) and particle air pollutants PM2.5 and PM10, playing a vital role in protecting drivers long after the pandemic has passed.

California ranks as the state with the worst air quality in the US. Data suggests that more than 90% of Californians breathe unhealthy levels of air pollutants every year and over 38 million residents live in counties where ozone or particle pollution placed their health at risk. California’s air pollution problem is multifaceted with worsening wildfires, high traffic levels and climatic factors all contributing to the issue.

The link between air pollution and COVID-19 mortality rates is well established. In North America, 17% of COVID-19 deaths can be attributed to long term exposure to air pollution.

Marc Ottolini, CEO, AirLabs, said: “California is the epicentre of the COVID-19 crisis in the US, and keeping public transit safe and operational during this time is crucial for ensuring that the public can continue to travel safely.

“Professional drivers are one of the most at-risk groups from COVID-19 and forward thinking public transit operators across the world are deploying our innovative air cleaning technology to cut the risk of infection for drivers, protect them against air pollution and keep services running.”

AirLabs, the UK-based company behind the AirBubbl device, has also developed a new air cleaning device for the passenger cabins of public transportation, including bus and rail. AirLabs AiroSafe is designed to remove airborne virus particles from the passenger cabins of public transport, by creating a personal clean air zone for every seat. The company aims to install the first AiroSafe units early this year and is currently setting up strategic partnerships with public transport manufacturers and operators.

Both AirLabs devices can play a vital role in getting passengers back into work and school safely, by reducing the risk of airborne transmission of coronavirus on mass transit and increasing public confidence. With 45% of Americans saying that they are concerned about going back to the office when it re-opens due to health concerns, the technology could play a key role in reassuring the public that it is safer to travel.

AirBubbl devices have been installed by Turlock Transit as part of a range of measures implemented to protect drivers and passengers throughout the pandemic, including additional disinfecting measures for buses, fewer passengers to aid social distancing, provision of free hand sanitizer and face masks if needed and a requirement for everyone to wear face masks while travelling.

Wayne York, Transit Manager, Turlock Transit, said: “California faces a huge health challenge both from COVID-19 and from harmful air pollution. These issues are particularly prevalent in the Central Valley and can’t be ignored.

“Rider and driver safety is our number one priority and we have implemented a range of safety measures across our fleet to keep our services safe for all. By installing the AirBubbl in our fleet, we are continuing to enhance the safety of our services and protect our drivers and passengers.”

Aerosol transmission of SARS-CoV-2
Coronaviruses such as the one that causes COVID-19 are believed to be spread via respiratory droplets produced by infected persons when they cough, sneeze, talk or breathe. While larger droplets quickly fall out of the air, smaller droplets persist as aerosols. Smaller aerosol particles are of concern because they may stay in the air for longer, travel further and be able to penetrate further into the respiratory tract when inhaled, according to a recent study by the UK’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory.

AirLabs has published a white paper on reducing exposure to airborne viruses using air filtration systems. It sets out the evidence behind airborne virus transmission and how air filtration can effectively remove bioaerosol particles.

The post California city protects bus drivers from COVID-19 by installing air cleaning technology first appeared on Envirotec. Source: https://envirotecmagazine.com/2021/02/26/california-city-protects-bus-drivers-from-covid-19-by-installing-air-cleaning-technology/

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New research method reveals significant reduction in carbon footprint of British pig farms

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The carbon footprint of British pig farming has reduced by almost 40% over the last 20 years, according to a new study, using a new methodology, led by the Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The independent research, funded by the EU, drew its conclusions from historic data on livestock systems across England, Scotland and Wales. Because the data on agricultural inputs was sparse, a new research methodology was developed in which outputs were used to retrospectively estimate inputs – a process called ‘inverted modelling’.

Northern Ireland was not included in the study, but there are plans to extend the methodology to NI in the near future.

Globally, agricultural systems have come under pressure to reduce their carbon footprint and the UK government has set a target of ‘carbon neutral’ farming by 2050.

Calculating the carbon footprint of a farming system is a complex metric involving a large number of indicators including what kind of fuel is used on the farm, how the soil is cultivated, the style of land management and the types of animals and crops being farmed.

Although the environmental impact contribution per unit of meat from pig systems is relatively low, pig meat is the meat type most produced and consumed globally (FAO STATs, 2019) and thus contributes significantly to several forms of environmental impacts. In 2013 it was estimated that the total contribution of pig systems to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions was 668 million tonnes CO2 – roughly 10% of GHG emissions produced by livestock systems overall.

In addition, pig systems are considered to be major contributors to the acidification and eutrophication of the environment due to emissions of nitrogen and phosphorous from manure storage and spreading.

In this new study, an overall drop in carbon footprint was evidenced across the pig farming sector, breaking down, for indoor and outdoor-bred pigs respectively, to reductions of 37.0% and 35.4% for Global Warming Potential (commonly known as carbon footprint); 21.2% and 16.4% for Terrestrial Acidification Potential; 22.5% and 22.3% for Freshwater Eutrophication Potential; and 15.8% and 16.8% for Agricultural Land Use.

The role of animal feed was found to be central to the environmental impact of pig farms – accounting for between 75-80% of carbon footprint. Changes to feed ingredients, therefore, had the potential to significantly alter the carbon rating of pig farms and the industry as a whole. Specifically, the increasing trend of replacing soya imported from South America (which has a high environmental footprint associated with deforestation) with home-grown crops such as rapeseed and sunflower meal to feed pigs was found to have a significant mitigating effect on environmental outputs.

Advances in animal nutrition and feedstuff availability were also found to have had a beneficial effect, particularly the increased availability of synthetic amino acids and enzymes, the price of which decreased over the time period in question. When added to domestic feedstuffs like rapeseed, these supplementary ingredients increased nutrient availability and improved feed balance, which was found to have reduced nutrient excretion in manure whilst boosting animal productivity by as much as 30%.

The study also found that such supplements in animal feed helped lower levels of phosphorous in run-off from pig manure by more than 20%, reducing the contribution of pig systems to freshwater pollution.

Changes in animal performance due to breeding for leaner and faster growing pigs, increases in number of piglets born per sow per litter and reductions in overall mortality were also found to have contributed significantly to a reduced environmental impact. For example, advances in breeding leaner and faster-growing pigs alone was found to lower carbon footprint by 20%.

The study was led by Professor Ilias Kyriazakis from IGFS in collaboration with other UK institutions, interrogating publicly available Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) data from Great Britain from 2000-2020. He believes it’s the first time inverted modelling has been used to investigate the environmental impact of any livestock system, marking a departure for research into the whole area of farming and carbon. The research has been published in the Agricultural Systems journal following peer review.

Prof Kyriazakis said: “The reason this research is so significant is that it shows an area of livestock farming where carbon footprint has been reducing over the past 20 years, almost ‘under the radar’.

“We hear a lot these days about the need for farmers to reduce their carbon outputs for the sake of the environment, especially as it applies to beef and dairy cattle farming. There is much more attention focussed on ruminant food systems as they produce higher GHG emissions.

“But I believe there are important lessons to be learned from this study – not only for better environmental management as it relates to pig farming, but potentially for all livestock systems. Some of the improvements identified in this study could potentially be applied to other animal systems, which would ultimately help move our collective agriculture systems towards a carbon-neutral model.”

The post New research method reveals significant reduction in carbon footprint of British pig farms first appeared on Envirotec. Source: https://envirotecmagazine.com/2021/02/26/new-research-method-reveals-significant-reduction-in-carbon-footprint-of-british-pig-farms/

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