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Future Fund, Unchained

The British Government ha presented the fund to help startups during the Coronavirus pandemic as the equity crowdfunding industry express some concerns.

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The future of a business ecosystem ultimately depends on its capacity to rejuvenate itself which, in turn, relies on the innovation capability brought in the system by startups. In other words, saving startups means building the future.

This is particularly true in a situation whereby coronavirus pandemic has come as a particular form of crisis which has hit new ventures that were in the best shape for moving things forwards.

Following the Save Our Startups campaign (of which, Oliver* has been a supporter), the British Government presented on Monday the Future Fund, a matched convertible loan scheme for startups

A first-come, first-served programme, it is an investor-led scheme, that is, a start-up lead investor (i.e. HNWI or professionals) can apply for the matched funding using the British Business Bank portal as of Wednesday, 20 May 2020.

Companies can qualify provided they are a UK-incorporated startup with a significant economic presence in the UK (either half your sales or staff are in the UK) and have raised at least £250k in equity finance in the last five years.

More here 👇

Presenting the programme, Rishi Sunak, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, told MPs on Monday that start-ups “provide the growth of tomorrow and they deserve our full support.”

Criticism has been expressed by key players in the equity crowdfunding industry, pointing out that the nature of the scheme would favour ventures backed by institutional investors.

For example, in his weekly note Thoughts from the Chairman, Seedrs’ Jeff Lynn argues that, “it is the company that has most of the necessary information to process investment-related documentation, and while an institutional lead investor will likely have systems in place that make this process easy, it may prove cumbersome—and even error-prone—for investors who are not as focused on the technical details of execution.”

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Photo by P C from Pexels

Source: https://thisisoliver.co/2020/05/19/future-fund-unchained/

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British newborn first baby in world to join cannabis therapy trial

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A newborn boy who was delivered by emergency caesarean section in March at a Norwich hospital became the first baby in the world to join a cannabis-derived treatment trial.

The study is the first step in what researchers say could one day lead to a cannabis-derived medicine being used routinely in neonatal care to help babies at risk of seizures and brain injury.

The baby, Oscar Parodi, was delivered on 11 March at Norfolk and Norwich university hospital (NNUH). He was unexpectedly born in a poor condition and needed to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he had cooling therapy for 72 hours.

His mother, Chelsea Parodi, from Watton, Norfolk, said: “I was approached after the birth about taking part in this study and I consulted my mum and my brother who is training to be a paramedic. It was hard but I wanted to do everything I could to help my baby boy. Oscar was in hospital for nine days and he was being monitored 24/7.” Parodi said her son was “doing fantastically well”.

The study is examining whether the medicine is safe and effective in lessening the degree of brain injury for babies with the condition neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

Prof Paul Clarke, a consultant neonatologist at NNUH, said there was a lot of excitement at the neonatal intensive care unit. “This is the first time a cannabis-derived medicine has been tested intravenously in human babies. It is hoped that it will be good for preventing seizures and protecting the brains of newborn babies with HIE.

“We have always had good support from families wanting to take part in research on our [unit] and they often do it from an altruistic point of view to help benefit future babies. One of the attractions of this trial for parents is the closer brain monitoring babies get as part of the study, because a more advanced brainwave monitor is used for the trial babies. This gives parents more reassurance that any seizures will be picked up.”

A second child, born in April at the hospital, is also part of the trial. Children in the trial receive standard hypothermia treatment for HIE, where the whole body is cooled down to 33.5C, as well as a single dose of the study drug or placebo, followed by some tests to measure levels of the drug in the blood.

The trial, in which the drug is administered intravenously and in which the first babies to take part only receive a 30th of the usual dose, involves other neonatal intensive care units in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and will take a year to complete.

Babies in the trial will be given a single dose of study medication, or a placebo, as soon as possible within 12 hours of birth.

The therapeutic ingredient of the medicine occurs naturally in the cannabis plant and is extracted under highly controlled conditions to ensure that the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component which causes a “high” is minimal.

Clarke added: “As with any study of a new medicine there may be unexpected side effects…

Source: https://mmpconnect.com/british-newborn-first-baby-in-world-to-join-cannabis-therapy-trial/

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Cannabis

British newborn first baby in world to join cannabis therapy trial

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A newborn boy who was delivered by emergency caesarean section in March at a Norwich hospital became the first baby in the world to join a cannabis-derived treatment trial.

The study is the first step in what researchers say could one day lead to a cannabis-derived medicine being used routinely in neonatal care to help babies at risk of seizures and brain injury.

The baby, Oscar Parodi, was delivered on 11 March at Norfolk and Norwich university hospital (NNUH). He was unexpectedly born in a poor condition and needed to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he had cooling therapy for 72 hours.

His mother, Chelsea Parodi, from Watton, Norfolk, said: “I was approached after the birth about taking part in this study and I consulted my mum and my brother who is training to be a paramedic. It was hard but I wanted to do everything I could to help my baby boy. Oscar was in hospital for nine days and he was being monitored 24/7.” Parodi said her son was “doing fantastically well”.

The study is examining whether the medicine is safe and effective in lessening the degree of brain injury for babies with the condition neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

Prof Paul Clarke, a consultant neonatologist at NNUH, said there was a lot of excitement at the neonatal intensive care unit. “This is the first time a cannabis-derived medicine has been tested intravenously in human babies. It is hoped that it will be good for preventing seizures and protecting the brains of newborn babies with HIE.

“We have always had good support from families wanting to take part in research on our [unit] and they often do it from an altruistic point of view to help benefit future babies. One of the attractions of this trial for parents is the closer brain monitoring babies get as part of the study, because a more advanced brainwave monitor is used for the trial babies. This gives parents more reassurance that any seizures will be picked up.”

A second child, born in April at the hospital, is also part of the trial. Children in the trial receive standard hypothermia treatment for HIE, where the whole body is cooled down to 33.5C, as well as a single dose of the study drug or placebo, followed by some tests to measure levels of the drug in the blood.

The trial, in which the drug is administered intravenously and in which the first babies to take part only receive a 30th of the usual dose, involves other neonatal intensive care units in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and will take a year to complete.

Babies in the trial will be given a single dose of study medication, or a placebo, as soon as possible within 12 hours of birth.

The therapeutic ingredient of the medicine occurs naturally in the cannabis plant and is extracted under highly controlled conditions to ensure that the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component which causes a “high” is minimal.

Clarke added: “As with any study of a new medicine there may be unexpected side effects…

Source: https://mmpconnect.com/british-newborn-first-baby-in-world-to-join-cannabis-therapy-trial/

Continue Reading

Cannabis

British newborn first baby in world to join cannabis therapy trial

Published

on

A newborn boy who was delivered by emergency caesarean section in March at a Norwich hospital became the first baby in the world to join a cannabis-derived treatment trial.

The study is the first step in what researchers say could one day lead to a cannabis-derived medicine being used routinely in neonatal care to help babies at risk of seizures and brain injury.

The baby, Oscar Parodi, was delivered on 11 March at Norfolk and Norwich university hospital (NNUH). He was unexpectedly born in a poor condition and needed to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he had cooling therapy for 72 hours.

His mother, Chelsea Parodi, from Watton, Norfolk, said: “I was approached after the birth about taking part in this study and I consulted my mum and my brother who is training to be a paramedic. It was hard but I wanted to do everything I could to help my baby boy. Oscar was in hospital for nine days and he was being monitored 24/7.” Parodi said her son was “doing fantastically well”.

The study is examining whether the medicine is safe and effective in lessening the degree of brain injury for babies with the condition neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

Prof Paul Clarke, a consultant neonatologist at NNUH, said there was a lot of excitement at the neonatal intensive care unit. “This is the first time a cannabis-derived medicine has been tested intravenously in human babies. It is hoped that it will be good for preventing seizures and protecting the brains of newborn babies with HIE.

“We have always had good support from families wanting to take part in research on our [unit] and they often do it from an altruistic point of view to help benefit future babies. One of the attractions of this trial for parents is the closer brain monitoring babies get as part of the study, because a more advanced brainwave monitor is used for the trial babies. This gives parents more reassurance that any seizures will be picked up.”

A second child, born in April at the hospital, is also part of the trial. Children in the trial receive standard hypothermia treatment for HIE, where the whole body is cooled down to 33.5C, as well as a single dose of the study drug or placebo, followed by some tests to measure levels of the drug in the blood.

The trial, in which the drug is administered intravenously and in which the first babies to take part only receive a 30th of the usual dose, involves other neonatal intensive care units in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and will take a year to complete.

Babies in the trial will be given a single dose of study medication, or a placebo, as soon as possible within 12 hours of birth.

The therapeutic ingredient of the medicine occurs naturally in the cannabis plant and is extracted under highly controlled conditions to ensure that the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component which causes a “high” is minimal.

Clarke added: “As with any study of a new medicine there may be unexpected side effects…

Source: https://mmpconnect.com/british-newborn-first-baby-in-world-to-join-cannabis-therapy-trial/

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