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FH Health launches new drive-through COVID-19 testing location at Pearson Airport

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Provides required pre-departure tests approved by Chinese government, with same-day results

TORONTO, July 27, 2021 /CNW/ – As more Canadians begin taking long-awaited trips abroad, travel to countries including China still have strict pre-departure testing requirements for entry to the country. Now, FH Health, a leader in Ontario for same-day COVID-19 testing, is making it easier to meet these requirements with its new drive-through testing centre near Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, providing COVID-19 tests with same-day results from the safety, privacy and convenience of their vehicle.

Located at 6585 Airport Road, FH Health’s newest clinic is one of several across downtown Toronto and the GTA, providing results for PCR tests in as little as 12 hours, rapid antigen tests in under 30 minutes and IgM and IgG antibody tests within 24 hours. The location is specifically approved by the Chinese government as a way to keep travellers on the move while adhering to China’s pandemic entry requirements, in order to help manage the virus’ spread internationally.

“As more people begin to travel again the possibility of transmission is still there – even among those who are fully vaccinated – so most countries, including China, still have strict pre-departure testing requirements for Canadians,” said Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer of FH Health. “RT-PCR, rapid antigen and antibody tests are all critical tools for quickly detecting and isolating asymptomatic cases and preventing transmission, which helps keep all travellers and communities safe.”

Members of the Chinese community can also access the FH Health website in both Simplified and Traditional Chinese, including a live chat service for support in booking their tests or to answer any questions they have.

Prior to booking their flight, travellers to China should check the Chinese Embassy in Canada website for the most up to date information on entry, exit and transit requirements in their chosen destination, and follow these tips for a smooth trip:

  • Stock up. Fill your pantry and freezer before leaving home in case you feel unwell upon return or don’t meet the entry requirements for the fully-vaccinated exemption.
  • Self isolate. Do this before and after the COVID-19 test to eliminate the risk of exposure, particularly as variants become more prevalent.
  • Get organized. Pack extra masks, hand sanitizer, snacks and any other items you may need as some retail services in the airport may still be closed or operating at reduced capacity.
  • Go early. Give yourself plenty of time; anticipate longer waits at the airport for increased security and slower screening procedures.
  • Stay informed. Know where to go for medical care and COVID-19 tests, and keep abreast of the local situation and any public health advisories.

To learn more about the FH Health’s testing centres, visit www.fhhealth.com.

About FH Health:
FH Health is a private healthcare company in Ontario and the leader in providing Covid-19 PCR, rapid antigen and antibody testing for organizations and individuals. Providing same-day results and real-time contact tracing to help groups and corporations keep their shared spaces safe, FH Health is the only testing provider in Ontario that can guarantee same-day results for COVID-19 PCR tests, allowing businesses to keep operations running and individuals to resume personal activity. For more information, visit www.fhhealth.com.

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Source: https://canadianaviationnews.wordpress.com/2021/07/27/fh-health-launches-new-drive-through-covid-19-testing-location-at-pearson-airport/

Aviation

Photos: RAAF Globemaster flies just 300 feet above Brisbane River

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RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing a flyover of Brisbane CBD and river (Craig Murray)

Australian Aviation photographer Craig Murray captured these incredible shots of a RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing its planned flyover of the Brisbane CBD.

The display formed part of the Sunsuper Riverfire event, which wrapped up the Brisbane Festival on Saturday evening.

The aircraft flew “not below 300 feet” for its planned flypast of the Brisbane river during the event, according to the RAAF, which saw audiences watch the C-17 dip well below the skyscrapers of Brisbane’s CBD and traipse along the river.

RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing a flyover of Brisbane CBD and river (Craig Murray)

As planned, the Globemaster flew over Mt Coot-tha and Suncorp Stadium, then headed south along the river at South Bank to the Goodwill Bridge, before repositioning to fly east along the Kangaroo Point cliffs toward the Storey Bridge.

Along with the C-17 flypast, Riverfire attendees also enjoyed a display of Army ARH and MRH-90 helicopters, with this aerial display returning for the first time since 2017.

Onlookers at the 2021 event were also treated to an Army Aviation display of ARH and MRH-90 helicopters (Craig Murray)

Videos of the 2018 Riverfire Globemaster display went viral earlier this year, after they were posted to Reddit.

Viewers were fascinated – and some horrified – as the angle of the imagery made the mighty aircraft appear as if it were weaving in and out of the skyscrapers themselves, as opposed to simply tracking along the river.

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The Boeing C-17A Globemaster III is a four-engine heavy transport aircraft that can accommodate huge payloads and land on runways just one-kilometre long.

That flexibility comes from its design, which mixes both high-lift wings and controls requiring just three onboard (pilot, co-pilot and loadmaster).

Cargo is loaded onto the C-17 through a ramp system at the back, while its floor has rollers that flip from flat to handle wheeled vehicles or pallets. RAAF owns eight, all operated by No. 36 Squadron and based at RAAF Base Amberley.

RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing a flyover of Brisbane CBD and river (Craig Murray)
Onlookers at the 2021 event were also treated to an Army Aviation display of ARH and MRH-90 helicopters (Craig Murray)

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Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/09/photos-raaf-globemaster-flies-just-300-feet-above-brisbane-river/

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Aviation

Photos: RAAF Globemaster flies just 300 feet above Brisbane River

Published

on

RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing a flyover of Brisbane CBD and river (Craig Murray)

Australian Aviation photographer Craig Murray captured these incredible shots of a RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing its planned flyover of the Brisbane CBD.

The display formed part of the Sunsuper Riverfire event, which wrapped up the Brisbane Festival on Saturday evening.

The aircraft flew “not below 300 feet” for its planned flypast of the Brisbane river during the event, according to the RAAF, which saw audiences watch the C-17 dip well below the skyscrapers of Brisbane’s CBD and traipse along the river.

RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing a flyover of Brisbane CBD and river (Craig Murray)

As planned, the Globemaster flew over Mt Coot-tha and Suncorp Stadium, then headed south along the river at South Bank to the Goodwill Bridge, before repositioning to fly east along the Kangaroo Point cliffs toward the Storey Bridge.

Along with the C-17 flypast, Riverfire attendees also enjoyed a display of Army ARH and MRH-90 helicopters, with this aerial display returning for the first time since 2017.

Onlookers at the 2021 event were also treated to an Army Aviation display of ARH and MRH-90 helicopters (Craig Murray)

Videos of the 2018 Riverfire Globemaster display went viral earlier this year, after they were posted to Reddit.

Viewers were fascinated – and some horrified – as the angle of the imagery made the mighty aircraft appear as if it were weaving in and out of the skyscrapers themselves, as opposed to simply tracking along the river.

PROMOTED CONTENT

The Boeing C-17A Globemaster III is a four-engine heavy transport aircraft that can accommodate huge payloads and land on runways just one-kilometre long.

That flexibility comes from its design, which mixes both high-lift wings and controls requiring just three onboard (pilot, co-pilot and loadmaster).

Cargo is loaded onto the C-17 through a ramp system at the back, while its floor has rollers that flip from flat to handle wheeled vehicles or pallets. RAAF owns eight, all operated by No. 36 Squadron and based at RAAF Base Amberley.

RAAF C-17 Globemaster III performing a flyover of Brisbane CBD and river (Craig Murray)
Onlookers at the 2021 event were also treated to an Army Aviation display of ARH and MRH-90 helicopters (Craig Murray)

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/09/photos-raaf-globemaster-flies-just-300-feet-above-brisbane-river/

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Aviation

QantasLink pilots accept backdated 2-year wage freeze

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Pilots at QantasLink have become the first major unionised cohort within the Qantas Group to accept a two-year wage freeze in light of the effect of the COVID pandemic on the industry.

According to the Australian Federation of Air Pilots, which negotiated the new enterprise agreement, the paperwork has been backdated to 2019, meaning the wage freeze period has now already passed.

As such, the 450 pilots involved will see as 2 per cent wage increase both in 2021 and 2022.

According to the union, over 90 per cent of participating QLink pilots at both Eastern Australia Airlines and Sunstate Australia Airlines voted in favour of the new enterprise agreement.

AFAP is also currently in negotiations with Qantas budget subsidiary Jetstar over its enterprise agreement with its pilots.

“The AFAP worked collaboratively with the company to conclude the enterprise bargaining discussions,” a spokesperson for the union said of the QantasLink agreement.

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“We are pleased to have arrived at a pragmatic outcome for the QantasLink pilot groups.

“The AFAP’s Eastern and Sunstate pilot councils look forward to resuming negotiations towards the second half of next year in what we anticipate will be a better negotiating environment.”

The company will now lodge the necessary paperwork with the Fair Work Commission to seek agreement certification, at which point back payments should then be processed, the union said.

This process could take up to eight weeks.

It makes QantasLink pilots the first major group to negotiate and accept the wage freeze deal, since Qantas announced in May this year that it would introduce a two-year wage freeze on all new enterprise agreements across the Qantas Group, as it seeks to reduce its annual costs by $1 billion by FY23.

At that time, the flag carrier confirmed that its next round of enterprise agreements will include the two-year wage freeze, and stipulate a 2 per cent annual increase thereafter, down from 3 per cent before the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Managing costs remains a critical part of our recovery, especially given the revenue we’ve lost and the intensely competitive market we’re in,” chief executive Alan Joyce said in the ASX announcement.

At the time, trade union TWU’s national secretary Michael Kaine criticised Qantas’ decision to freeze wages and stunt future wage growth, in light of the fact that the airline welcomed over $2 billion in government bailouts since the beginning of the pandemic.

Kaine said that Qantas’ latest management decision sees the airline “acting like a dictator”, by “using public resources to shore up its position, cut jobs and impose unilateral decisions on its workforce”.

The TWU pointed out that in 2014, Qantas posted a $2.8 billion loss and imposed a similar two-year wage freeze on its workforce, from which the union believes Qantas workers’ earnings never recovered.

“There is a system of enterprise bargaining in place so that both sides can sit down and compromise,” Kaine said, adding that the wage freeze announcement “flies in the face of enterprise bargaining”.

“This year Qantas will have received $2 billion in federal government funding. On top of that the airline has wrung more public funding from state governments following recent announcements,” he said.

“We cannot see the benefit of this funding for the public when it continually results in job losses, outsourced workers and lower wages.”

It comes one month after Qantas announced it posted an underlying loss before tax of $1.83 billion, due to “diabolical” operating conditions and sudden border closures in the second half of the financial year.

This was despite the airline receiving over $1.1 billion in government aid through multiple financial aid programs, including $558 million in JobKeeper wage subsidies.

Qantas saw a staggering statutory loss before tax, which includes one-off costs such as redundancy payouts and aircraft writedowns, of $2.35 billion.

“This loss shows the impact that a full year of closed international borders and more than 330 days of domestic travel restrictions had on the national carrier,” Joyce said, adding that operating conditions have “frankly been diabolical”.

“It comes on top of the significant loss we reported last year and the travel restrictions we’ve seen in the past few months. By the end of this calendar year, it’s likely COVID will cost us more than $20 billion in revenue,” Joyce said.

The flag carrier introduced $650 million in permanent long-term cost reductions over the year, with the aim of reaching $1 billion in permanent annual savings by FY23.

Over 9,400 people have permanently left Qantas since the beginning of the pandemic, more than the 8,500 previously forecast by the airline.

According to Qantas, the additional staff losses were driven by offshore job losses at airports and sale offices, the introduction of some automation, and an increase in voluntary redundancies.

Over 8,500 employees currently remain stood down from their duties, 6,000 of which are tied to Qantas’ international operations.

“We have had to make a lot of big and difficult structural changes to deal with this crisis, and that phase is mostly behind us,” Joyce said.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/09/qantaslink-pilots-accept-backdated-2-year-wage-freeze/

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Aviation

QantasLink pilots accept backdated 2-year wage freeze

Published

on

Pilots at QantasLink have become the first major unionised cohort within the Qantas Group to accept a two-year wage freeze in light of the effect of the COVID pandemic on the industry.

According to the Australian Federation of Air Pilots, which negotiated the new enterprise agreement, the paperwork has been backdated to 2019, meaning the wage freeze period has now already passed.

As such, the 450 pilots involved will see as 2 per cent wage increase both in 2021 and 2022.

According to the union, over 90 per cent of participating QLink pilots at both Eastern Australia Airlines and Sunstate Australia Airlines voted in favour of the new enterprise agreement.

AFAP is also currently in negotiations with Qantas budget subsidiary Jetstar over its enterprise agreement with its pilots.

“The AFAP worked collaboratively with the company to conclude the enterprise bargaining discussions,” a spokesperson for the union said of the QantasLink agreement.

PROMOTED CONTENT

“We are pleased to have arrived at a pragmatic outcome for the QantasLink pilot groups.

“The AFAP’s Eastern and Sunstate pilot councils look forward to resuming negotiations towards the second half of next year in what we anticipate will be a better negotiating environment.”

The company will now lodge the necessary paperwork with the Fair Work Commission to seek agreement certification, at which point back payments should then be processed, the union said.

This process could take up to eight weeks.

It makes QantasLink pilots the first major group to negotiate and accept the wage freeze deal, since Qantas announced in May this year that it would introduce a two-year wage freeze on all new enterprise agreements across the Qantas Group, as it seeks to reduce its annual costs by $1 billion by FY23.

At that time, the flag carrier confirmed that its next round of enterprise agreements will include the two-year wage freeze, and stipulate a 2 per cent annual increase thereafter, down from 3 per cent before the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Managing costs remains a critical part of our recovery, especially given the revenue we’ve lost and the intensely competitive market we’re in,” chief executive Alan Joyce said in the ASX announcement.

At the time, trade union TWU’s national secretary Michael Kaine criticised Qantas’ decision to freeze wages and stunt future wage growth, in light of the fact that the airline welcomed over $2 billion in government bailouts since the beginning of the pandemic.

Kaine said that Qantas’ latest management decision sees the airline “acting like a dictator”, by “using public resources to shore up its position, cut jobs and impose unilateral decisions on its workforce”.

The TWU pointed out that in 2014, Qantas posted a $2.8 billion loss and imposed a similar two-year wage freeze on its workforce, from which the union believes Qantas workers’ earnings never recovered.

“There is a system of enterprise bargaining in place so that both sides can sit down and compromise,” Kaine said, adding that the wage freeze announcement “flies in the face of enterprise bargaining”.

“This year Qantas will have received $2 billion in federal government funding. On top of that the airline has wrung more public funding from state governments following recent announcements,” he said.

“We cannot see the benefit of this funding for the public when it continually results in job losses, outsourced workers and lower wages.”

It comes one month after Qantas announced it posted an underlying loss before tax of $1.83 billion, due to “diabolical” operating conditions and sudden border closures in the second half of the financial year.

This was despite the airline receiving over $1.1 billion in government aid through multiple financial aid programs, including $558 million in JobKeeper wage subsidies.

Qantas saw a staggering statutory loss before tax, which includes one-off costs such as redundancy payouts and aircraft writedowns, of $2.35 billion.

“This loss shows the impact that a full year of closed international borders and more than 330 days of domestic travel restrictions had on the national carrier,” Joyce said, adding that operating conditions have “frankly been diabolical”.

“It comes on top of the significant loss we reported last year and the travel restrictions we’ve seen in the past few months. By the end of this calendar year, it’s likely COVID will cost us more than $20 billion in revenue,” Joyce said.

The flag carrier introduced $650 million in permanent long-term cost reductions over the year, with the aim of reaching $1 billion in permanent annual savings by FY23.

Over 9,400 people have permanently left Qantas since the beginning of the pandemic, more than the 8,500 previously forecast by the airline.

According to Qantas, the additional staff losses were driven by offshore job losses at airports and sale offices, the introduction of some automation, and an increase in voluntary redundancies.

Over 8,500 employees currently remain stood down from their duties, 6,000 of which are tied to Qantas’ international operations.

“We have had to make a lot of big and difficult structural changes to deal with this crisis, and that phase is mostly behind us,” Joyce said.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/09/qantaslink-pilots-accept-backdated-2-year-wage-freeze/

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