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F-35 visits new home of RAAF Base Tindal for first time

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Wing Commander Shane Smith, right, with Air Base Executive Officer, Squadron Leader Lauren Guest and the F-35A at Tindal. (Stewart Gould)
Wing Commander Shane Smith, right, with Air Base Executive Officer, Squadron Leader Lauren Guest and the F-35A at Tindal. (Stewart Gould)

An RAAF F-35 has finally visited its soon-to-be new home of RAAF Base Tindal for the very first time.

Defence revealed the “flying visit” took place on 20 May as part of the ongoing Exercise Arnhem Thunder 21. It comes before some of the fleet take up full-time residence in Katherine, NT, in December.

The visit gave personnel hands-on exposure to the ground-handling aspects of the F-35A, including security, emergency response and base aviation safety.

Tindal’s Senior Australian Defence Force Officer Wing Commander Shane Smith said, “I’ve been in the Air Force for almost 40 years and saw the first Hornets visit RAAF Base Edinburgh as part of their introduction to service, so to see their replacement fly into Tindal for the first time was both exciting and somewhat sad.

“But overwhelmingly, I felt the same pride that I did in the ’80s as a young 21-year-old on the tarmac watching the new F/A-18A Hornets taxi in – the F-35A forms an integral part of the Air Force’s next generation of air power and that’s very exciting.”

The aircraft that flew into RAAF Base Tindal is also the first F-35 to be assigned to No. 75 Squadron and had the tail number 029.

“The transition to the F-35A is the next big step for Tindal, a new capability that kicks off a large-scale upgrade to be a truly multi-role airbase capable of projecting the full range of air power across Australia and beyond,” WGCDR Smith said.

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“Katherine welcomed the F-35A as it flew over the town on approach to the base – I’ve never met such a supportive community, and one that holds Tindal closely as a valued member of the region.”

Over the coming years, Australia will purchase 72 of the advanced fifth-generation fighter aircraft as part of the $17 billion AIR 6000 Phase 2A/B program – which is aimed at replacing the ageing F/A-18A/B Classic Hornets that have been in service with the RAAF since 1985.

The F-35A – the variant chosen by the RAAF – will have a projected life of 30 years in service and will also be based at RAAF Base Williamtown.

Earlier this week, Australian Aviation reported how two F-35s took to the skies with a full complement of weapons for the first time.

The landmark moment came as the pair were taking part in Exercise Arnhem Thunder 21 last month from RAAF Base Darwin.

More than 500 personnel and 50 aircraft are participating in the training exercise, the largest post-COVID, which will run until 15 June 2021 and focus on ‘force generation training’.

In addition to their internal payload, the F-35s departed with laser-guided GBU-12 bombs attached to their under-wing pylons.

The bombs were dropped on ground-based targets at the Delamere Air Weapons Range, located about 120 kilometres south of Katherine.

During the course of the exercise, 10 F-35As normally based at RAAF Base Williamtown will drop more than 50 inert GBU-12s.

Australia took delivery of three new F-35s in March, taking its current fleet to 33.

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Source: https://australianaviation.com.au/2021/06/f-35-visits-new-home-of-raaf-base-tindal-for-first-time/

Aerospace

Airbus to deliver three more H145 helicopters to SAF Group

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Aviation and aerospace firm SAF Group has ordered three additional H145 helicopters for emergency medical services (EMS) in France.

SAF will base the three more five-bladed aircraft in Grenoble, Valence, and Montpellier.

Airbus unveiled the multimission H145 light twin-engine helicopter at Heli-Expo 2019 and upgraded the aircraft by adding an advanced five-bladed rotor.

The upgrade increases the useful load of the helicopter by 150kg.

The new bearingless main rotor design will also ease maintenance operations, thereby improving the serviceability and reliability of the H145.

SAF ordered three H145s in 2018 and 2020.

Airbus delivered the first of this aircraft recently and is set to be deployed for EMS missions in Belgium.

SAF CEO Tristan Serretta said: “Introducing six new H145s in France and Belgium in just 12 months is in line with our strategy to increase the capacity of the growing number of EMS services that place their trust in us.

“This increase of our positioning is made possible by the level of performance and the versatility of this successful helicopter. SAF is determined to help demonstrate, together with the heads of emergency services, that having the right performance and at the right cost is key to saving lives.”

SAF operates 55 Airbus helicopters, including a Super Puma, H135s and H125s.

The new H145s are expected to strengthen the company’s capability to deliver EMS missions.

There are currently more than 1,470 H145 family helicopters in service worldwide, including 470 helicopters of the H145 family for the EMS mission.

Airbus Helicopters CEO Bruno Even said: “The H145 is an ideal platform for EMS with the largest cabin in its class and unbeatable payload, it is capable of undertaking the most demanding missions. We are happy that the five-bladed H145 is gaining momentum in France and playing a key role in the modernisation of the EMS fleet in the country.”

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Source: https://www.aerospace-technology.com/news/airbus-saf-group-h145-order/

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Aerospace

Airbus to deliver three more H145 helicopters to SAF Group

Published

on

Aviation and aerospace firm SAF Group has ordered three additional H145 helicopters for emergency medical services (EMS) in France.

SAF will base the three more five-bladed aircraft in Grenoble, Valence, and Montpellier.

Airbus unveiled the multimission H145 light twin-engine helicopter at Heli-Expo 2019 and upgraded the aircraft by adding an advanced five-bladed rotor.

The upgrade increases the useful load of the helicopter by 150kg.

The new bearingless main rotor design will also ease maintenance operations, thereby improving the serviceability and reliability of the H145.

SAF ordered three H145s in 2018 and 2020.

Airbus delivered the first of this aircraft recently and is set to be deployed for EMS missions in Belgium.

SAF CEO Tristan Serretta said: “Introducing six new H145s in France and Belgium in just 12 months is in line with our strategy to increase the capacity of the growing number of EMS services that place their trust in us.

“This increase of our positioning is made possible by the level of performance and the versatility of this successful helicopter. SAF is determined to help demonstrate, together with the heads of emergency services, that having the right performance and at the right cost is key to saving lives.”

SAF operates 55 Airbus helicopters, including a Super Puma, H135s and H125s.

The new H145s are expected to strengthen the company’s capability to deliver EMS missions.

There are currently more than 1,470 H145 family helicopters in service worldwide, including 470 helicopters of the H145 family for the EMS mission.

Airbus Helicopters CEO Bruno Even said: “The H145 is an ideal platform for EMS with the largest cabin in its class and unbeatable payload, it is capable of undertaking the most demanding missions. We are happy that the five-bladed H145 is gaining momentum in France and playing a key role in the modernisation of the EMS fleet in the country.”

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.aerospace-technology.com/news/airbus-saf-group-h145-order/

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Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

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The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

Published

on

The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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