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Drive In Air Shows Are Starting To Take Off In COVID era

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Call it one of the more unique aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Just as drive in movies are growing in popularity, drive in airshows are actually starting to become a thing.

So far this season, we’ve seen three drive in airshows announced. A few weeks back, the North Georgia airshow announced that they would be a drive in airshow. Then just recently the very popular Alliance Air Show announced that instead of being cancelled, it would be converted to a drive in show.

How do these drive in airshows work?

The Alliance Air Show in particular will be different but will still feature some of your favorite flying acts . “The circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic provided the unique opportunity to be innovative in how to move forward with hosting the air show for the North Texas community,” said Christina Carey, director of special projects for Alliance Air Productions, producer of the event and a nonprofit organization created by Hillwood. “Our newly reformatted event will be a memorable, fun and socially distanced drive-in experience as we celebrate 30 years of soaring excellence.”

Much like a drive in movie, drive in airshows are exactly what you would think they would be. Instead of congregating around a flight line, guests remain in their car (or nearby their car) and watch the show. In order to comply with social distancing, these new drive in shows will lack the static displays, bouncy castles, and assortment of food. What they lack in terms of flight line entertainment, they will make up with thrills in the skies. The performances will remain the same. And in a season where so many airshows have been cancelled, that is a good thing.

Is this the new normal? Hopefully not. But until COVID-19 is in our rear view mirror, it is better than nothing.

Alliance Air Show in Fort Worth, Texas

Held October 17-18, 2020. The current plan is to offer a limited number of parking tickets available for purchase on a first-come, first-served basis in mid-September at AllianceAirShow.com. There will be no parking tickets sold onsite.

Wings Over North Georgia Air Show

Held October 24-25, 2020. Wings Over North Georgia officials explain there will be portable restroom accommodations and food vending sites. Cowman encourages guests to also bring their own food and drinks to Georgia’s largest tailgate party. Tickets are $130 per car. You can learn more at Wings Over Georgia’s website.


Source: https://www.avgeekery.com/drive-in-air-shows-are-starting-to-take-off-in-covid-era/

Aviation

Why Doesn’t The United States Have A Flag Carrier?

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The United States is notable for many things in aviation. However, the US does not have currently, and likely will not have, a flag carrier. For such a mature market, it may come as a surprise to many that the US does not have a flag carrier, but it is not very surprising given the developments in the US air market in the late 20th-century.

United And American
The US has some of the world’s largest airlines, but it does not have an official or de facto flag carrier. Photo: Getty Images

The US air market in the 20th-century

The US air market grew quickly after World War II passed. In the 1950s and 1960s, the jet age advanced the reach of US airlines. These planes were faster and had the opportunity to fly longer missions with fewer stops, which made commercial aviation in the US much more efficient and convenient.

US aviation was governed by the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) from the late-1930s onwards. Regulating air service, the CAB would determine which carriers could fly which routes, thereby turning competition from a market decision to a government one.

Pan Am and TWA
The early days of US commercial aviation were so much different than it is today. Photo: Getty Images

This helped certain carriers get access to certain routes and operate with minimal, or in some cases, no competition. However, in the post-war period in the US, there was a growth in air travel and increased competition on many routes. However, one airline maintained its strong position.

The unofficial US flag carrier

Growing in prominence during World War II, Pan Am was truly the unofficial US flag carrier in the 20th-century. Even in the post-war era, Pan Am maintained an impressive array of international routes. Pan Am was the premier international airline representing the US. It was known for bringing the Beatles to the US, further raising the airline’s notoriety.

Boeing 707 Pan Am
Pan Am relied on the Boeing 707 for long-haul operations in the early days of the American jet age. Photo: Getty Images

Pan Am, however, still had to face international competition. TWA and Braniff, among several other airlines, flew internationally, presenting some competition to Pan Am. However, Pan Am competed vigorously against these rivals and maintained its significant international presence.

Pan Am was such a significant carrier that it helped pioneer the development of one of the most iconic aircraft in the world: the Boeing 747. Pan Am was the launch customer for the Boeing 747 and, arguably, was one of its most iconic operators. In 1970, First Lady of the United States, Pat Nixon, christened a Boeing 747, marking the aircraft and airline’s significance.

Pan Am 747
The Pan Am 747 is one of the most recognizable aircraft of the last century. Photo: Getty Images

The first Boeing 747s came to Pan Am while the carrier was at its peak with an international route portfolio that extended mostly out of the East Coast to South America and Europe. The airline sought to portray itself as a premier airline and offered a premium experience for its passengers.

The 1970s were key to the demise of Pan Am

From 1973 onwards, Pan Am significantly struggled. Starting with the oil crisis in 1973 and growing competition, the airline worked to right-size its operations. However, the real blow to Pan Am came in 1978.

In 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed the Airline Deregulation Act into law, which phased out the CAB and deregulated the American airline industry. It was essentially with this stroke that the US officially ended having even a de facto flag carrier.

Pan Am also operated the iconic Worldport. Photo: Getty Images

During the regulated years, Pan Am could not fly domestic routes. The CAB was concerned about Pan Am growing so big it would monopolize the growing air market, so it left Pan Am with operating international routes with few exceptions. The carrier seriously wanted domestic routes, but it never got the breadth that it needed.

So, in 1978, all of a sudden, Pan Am had a limited domestic network and a large international network with nearly no connecting feed. On international routes, Pan Am faced a host of new competitors that seriously threatened its business.

From then on, Pan Am was on the slide. After a rough merger with National Airlines, the carrier went through a difficult 1980s and tried various strategies, including divestment of some assets and fleet advancements, which helped but was not enough for the airline. One thing it could not prepare for was the 1988 Lockerbie bombing and subsequent financial struggles.

In 1991, Pan Am ceased operations, leading to the end of the premier international airline.

Pan Am 747
By 1991, the once iconic Pan Am was a struggling airline that shut down. Photo: Getty Images

The US has not had a flag carrier since

Since the US opened up its air market for competition, the country has not been terribly fond of maintaining a flag carrier. Many airlines have definitely tried to take the mantle of being an American flag carrier,

Today, the US has three major international airlines. These are American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, and United Airlines. All three have large domestic networks that help feed their international routes.

LAX Delta Air Lines and American Airlines
American and Delta are two of the largest airlines in the United States. Photo: Getty Images

On the domestic front, some of the largest airlines include Southwest, JetBlue, and Alaska. Rounding out the airlines are the low-cost airlines, such as Spirit and Frontier. There are plenty of airlines around, and that competition is one reason why the US does not have a flag carrier.

Flag carriers around the world

There are many flag carriers around the world, and they all generally have a few different features in common. Flag carriers are usually an airline that flies the largest portfolio of international routes out of a country and offers a sense of national pride for their home country. In some cases, those flag carriers are government-owned, though that is not always the case.

delta with klm
KLM, the flag carrier of the Netherlands, does not operate a domestic network, but Delta does. Photo: Getty Images

Some well-known examples of flag carriers include British Airways, Vietnam Airlines, Singapore Airlines, Saudia, Qatar Airways, KLM, Air France, Qantas, and plenty of others. The UAE actually has two flag carriers: Etihad and Emirates. Most of these airlines are serving some smaller countries that do not need a massive domestic network.

However, flag carriers are starting to go out of style. Some flag carriers, such as Thai Airways and South African Airways, are facing difficult futures that will require restructuring, while others, such as British Airways and Aeromexico, are facing strong competitors.

AA 787-9
Even though American’s tail resembles the flag of the US, it is not the flag carrier of the US. Photo: Getty Images

The US does fine without a flag carrier, and the deregulated aviation market in the US is not conducive to having a sole flag carrier. Instead of one flag carrier, all US carriers proudly fly the US flag at home and overseas, representing the diversity of airlines. For this reason, the US is unlikely to get a sole flag carrier now or in the future.

Do you think the US should have a flag carrier, or are you glad that the US does not have one? Let us know in the comments!

Source: https://simpleflying.com/us-no-flag-carrier/

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The A-10C Demo Team Unveiled Their “Warthog” In Vietnam-Era Camouflage Color Scheme

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The SouthEast Asia camouflage of the A-10C, inspired by the F-105 Thunderchiefs of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, will honor the unit’s Prisoners of War, Missing in Action and Veterans. The U.S. Air Force A-10C […]

The post The A-10C Demo Team Unveiled Their “Warthog” In Vietnam-Era Camouflage Color Scheme appeared first on The Aviationist.

Source: https://theaviationist.com/2021/02/27/the-a-10c-demo-team-unveiled-their-warthog-in-vietnam-era-camouflage-color-scheme/

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Boeing to pay US$6.6 million in fines to FAA over non-compliance

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US aircraft manufacturer, Boeing has been ordered to pay a total of US$6.6 million in penalty fees by the United States aviation regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The financial penalties are in relation to a 2015 settlement agreement, which set out to change internal processes withing Boeing in an effort “to improve and prioritize regulatory compliance.” According to the FAA, US$1.21 million relates to settlement fees in relation to two FAA enforcement cases, one of which concerns initial safety oversight lapses with the Boeing 787 aircraft.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the 2015 safety agreement included the planemaker’s commitment to improving the “certification processes to further enhance the airworthiness” as well as a “continued compliance of all Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) products.” As part of the settlement agreement, Boeing had to pay $12 Million in 2015. Under the terms of the agreement which cannot be appealed, the FAA can now issue Boeing with penalties “for failing to meet its performance obligations.”

In a statement, seen by AeroNewsX, FAA Administrator Steve Dickson said, “Boeing failed to meet all of its obligations under the settlement agreement, and the FAA is holding Boeing accountable by imposing additional penalties.” The FAA Administrator added “I have reiterated to Boeing’s leadership time and again that the company must prioritize safety and regulatory compliance, and that the FAA will always put safety first in all its decisions.”

Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner
Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner registered N7874. Photo by Brandon Farris | AeroNewsX.

The FAA also outlined details regarding the two enforcement cases, which are expected to cost Boeing US$1.21 million in settlement fees. The first case alleges that Boeing “implemented an improper structure” regarding its FAA-approved Organization Designation Authorization (ODA) program. According to the FAA, the regulator is of the belief that the aircraft manufacturer “exerted undue pressure or interfered” with company officials who are involved in safety checks at the company. The second FAA enforcement case alleges Boeing “failed to follow its quality-control processes” and subjected staff at the ODA program to “undue pressure or interference in relation to an aircraft airworthiness inspection” of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

Along with the fine imposed on Boeing, the aircraft manufacturer is now required to begin in-depth inspections and perform fixes on roughly 88 parked Boeing 787s, which are reported to have multiple structural integrity defects deep within its fuselage. The Boeing 787 Dreamliner programme while being mostly successful, has always been plagued with a myriad of technical setbacks and quality issues.

Some of the more common issues faced so far were flaws associated with the lithium-ion batteries installed on the aircraft early on as well as the current ongoing problems with Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 engines. More recently, a structural defect associated with the aircraft’s interior fuselage skin was made known to regulatory authorities late last year, prompting airlines to pull some of the affected jets from service. The accumulated issues and flaws which plagued the Boeing 787 programme has resulted in a substantial financial burden on airlines operating the type with some 787s visiting maintenance hangars more frequently than planned.

The post Boeing to pay US$6.6 million in fines to FAA over non-compliance appeared first on AeroNewsX.

Source: https://aeronewsx.com/boeing-to-pay-us6-6-million-in-fines-to-faa-over-non-compliance/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=boeing-to-pay-us6-6-million-in-fines-to-faa-over-non-compliance

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All three crew members killed in a plane crash in US Georgia

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A single-engine plane bound for Florida crashed after takeoff Friday evening from an airport in northeast Georgia, killing the three people aboard, authorities said.

 

 

 

 

Single-engine Cessna 182 Skylane crashed around 6:50 p.m. approximately two miles (3.2 kilometers) northeast of the Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport in Gainesville, US Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Emma Duncan said, Associated Press reported.

 

 

 

 

“The aircraft crashed shortly after departing from Gainesville on a planned flight to Daytona Beach,” Duncan said in an emailed statement.

 

 

Duncan’s statement said the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration added that an investigation has been launched into the cause of the crash.

 

 

We will update in Same post as we get more updates.

Source: https://www.amevoice.com/Aviation-News/all-three-crew-members-killed-in-a-plane-crash-in-us-georgia/

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