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DOCOMO’s XR Studio opening in Odaiba, Japan to include the new Mantis Vision Volumetric Studio 3iosk

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In Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality News

January 21, 2021 – Mantis Vision, a provider of 3D image and volumetric video capture solutions, has today announced that its ‘Mantis Vision Volumetric Studio 3iosk’ volumetric video capture technology will be included within DOCOMO’s new ‘docomo XR Studio’ in Odaiba, Japan when it opens later this month. DOCOMO is Japan’s largest telecommunications company.

Esta Chiang, Volumetric Pipeline Technical Director of Mantis Vision, said: “Mantis Vision has seen many new volumetric video content creations this year, and we’re excited to see what new applications emerge from the new 3iosk Studio”.

Volumetric video capture utilizes an array of cameras to record people or objects in motion from all angles, in order to turn them into realistic 3D holograms. The resulting digital content can then be viewed from any angle on mobile devices and computers. The technology is already in use in a range of industries, including entertainment, sports, music videos, and gaming.

The Mantis Vision Volumetric Studio 3iosk captures dynamic 3D volumetric videos that can be shared as 3D assets in augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), virtual production or social media. With its small footprint and no green screen or render farm required, the Mantis Vision Volumetric Studio 3iosk is designed for use in commercial settings including retail stores, museums, events, theme parks and shopping malls. Based on patented technology and proprietary Volumetric Cameras (VoCams), Mantis Vision states that its Volumetric Studio 3iosk setup has “the fastest workflow from scan to share, with exceptional data quality and an easy-to-use interface.”

An example of Mantis Vision’s live volumetric capture demo.

In addition, the 3iosk studio offers real-time live-streaming capability, allowing viewers to have live interactions with 3D holograms. The same solution can be used for live virtual concerts, interviews, E-sports and mixed reality training, according to the company.  

Through the opening of its XR Studio, DOCOMO will help to promote volumetric video technology, as well as collaborate with content creators, and will continue to explore new methods that utilize XR technology.

For more information on Mantis Vision and its volumetric capture solutions, please visit the company’s website.

Image / video credit: Mantis Vision

About the author

Sam Sprigg

Sam is the Founder and Managing Editor of Auganix. With a background in research and report writing, he covers news articles on both the AR and VR industries. He also has an interest in human augmentation technology as a whole, and does not just limit his learning specifically to the visual experience side of things.

Source: https://www.auganix.org/docomos-xr-studio-opening-in-odaiba-japan-to-include-the-new-mantis-vision-volumetric-studio-3iosk/

AR/VR

PC VR Streaming Now Part of Virtual Desktop’s Official Oculus Quest App

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Virtual Desktop

Guy Godin’s Virtual Desktop has been around since 2016, originally allowing PC users to use their computers in VR. In 2019 the app came to Oculus Quest allowing wireless PC streaming but the feature was subsequently removed. Now it’s back, officially through the Oculus Quest store with no sideloading required.

Virtual Desktop

That 2019 launch happened in May, it was in June that Facebook caused an uproar by requesting the feature be removed. With the community up in arms, the developer offered a workaround via a patch that needed to be sideloaded from SideQuest. Thus making the process more complicated than it needed to be.

He then submitted the app to Oculus’ new App Lab once that launched which would’ve made the process easier. Thankfully, even App Lab wasn’t needed as Godin announced the rollout today of Virtual Desktop 1.20, finally adding PC streaming as an official feature. So that means you can wirelessly stream your favourite PC VR titles like Half-Life: Alyx or Phasmophobia for example.

As for the other update additions in Virtual Desktop v1.20:

  • Added multi-account support in the Streamer app (Windows only for now)
  • Screenshots taken on your Quest while using Virtual Desktop are now automatically transferred to your desktop (Windows only for now)
  • Added voice-over for notifications
  • Added Wi-Fi speed information, runtime used by game and GPU name to the Performance Overlay
  • Changed Sliced Encoding and Microphone Passthrough to be enabled by default
Oculus Quest 2

Virtual Desktop is available through the Oculus Quest store for £14.99 GBP. Obviously, it should go without saying that you’ll need a VR-capable PC to run any of the awesome videogames you own (or want to buy) without the worry of a cable. And some decent WiFi without too many obstructions to ensure a smooth gameplay experience.

VRFocus will continue its coverage of Virtual Desktop, reporting back with the latest updates.

Source: https://www.vrfocus.com/2021/02/pc-vr-streaming-now-part-of-virtual-desktops-official-oculus-quest-app/

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AR/VR

Review: A Wake Inn

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A Wake Inn

Hotels are supposed to be friendly, welcoming places where you can put your feet up and relax, putting aside repetitive everyday duties to enjoy some much-needed downtime. They’re not supposed to have dimly lit corridors, scruffy carpets, dodgy elevators and residents that want to kill you – unless you’ve gone really cheap. Hence why they work so well as scary backdrops, whether in films such as The Shining or in virtual reality (VR) videogames like VR Bros’ A Wake Inn. So can this new experience provide the thrills and chills VRFocus comes to expect from a good VR horror?

A Wake Inn

A truly scary VR title can’t simply provide creatures that jump out the darkness – although some have tried – they need to create an unmistakably tense atmosphere that starts with a good narrative. Set in the seemingly abandoned Silver Inn Hotel, A Wake Inn throws you into a dark, twisted world where no humans exist apart from Doctor Finnegan, the owner of the estate and your only connection to the outside world. In fact, you’re not even human, waking to find yourself as a mechanised mannequin in a wheelchair.

As this robotic doll who’s unable to walk, you’re encouraged by Finnegan via shortwave radio to explore the hotel and put an end to the madness inside, hopefully finding a way out and why you’re in this state in the process. However, you’re not the only one roaming these creepy looking hallways, as the eccentric doctor just so happens to be the creator of a bunch of living dolls that occasionally have faces but always have hammers, blades and other nasty adornments as hands.

It sets the scene for what starts out as a truly intense experience simply because you don’t have the manoeuvrability, carefully exploring the hotel’s rooms and corridors for clues and useful items. It’s clear from the outset that VR Bros has carefully crafted A Wake Inn to tailor to VR gameplay mechanics, from the locomotion to the puzzles and even the storage.

A Wake Inn

Before the single-player campaign even loads you’re introduced to A Wake Inn via a steampunk array of buttons, switches and dials, all serving as the options menu. Here you can activate teleport – it doesn’t default – alter settings such as gamma and steering sensitivity. All very well constructed and the sort of system more VR titles should employ. The only problem was there didn’t seem to be a way to use a single finger and point, it might not seem like much but when trying to press a button with others nearby that process becomes trickier – this was tested on Valve Index, Oculus Rift and Oculus Quest via a Link cable.

Once inside the hotel everything is nicely hands-on. There’s no HUD of any description, you’ve got a neat little storage box on your lap to put fuses, keys and other items in, plus there are three buttons inside the lid to save, load and head back to the main menu. As mentioned, you’re sat in a wheelchair so simply grab the wheels and get pushing. You can pick up a decent pace but corners are a little more difficult. Alternatively, there’s a joystick much like an electric wheelchair (which can be swapped to the left or right) or if teleport is active, you then select the appropriate hand to utilise the movement method.

After trying each one, teleport just proved to be way too slow and annoying cycling through the three-hand options (normal, extended reach and teleport), made even worse when trying to evade the living dolls. Using the wheels should’ve been the most intuitive yet ended up feeling too erratic unless you really took it slow and steady. So that left the joystick, providing a happy medium between speed and flexibility nipping through doors and around tight corners.

A Wake Inn

At first glance A Wake Inn comes across as your classic slow horror, building tension and encouraging you to avoid altercations at all costs. The design echoes the early 20th century and its art deco era, with an intricately detailed environment and just the right amount of lighting mixed with dark corners to provide an ominous feeling. Yet what starts out as something scary to sneak through eventually descends in brawling action, losing that sense of what it’s trying to deliver.

That first encounter with one of the living dolls does provide a decent fright moment, this weird mechanical monstrosity flailing away at you. Initially, with no defence the only option is to flee and hopefully find a safe spot. Which, as it turns out, isn’t too hard as each doll sticks to a certain area and generally only becomes aware of your presence should you make a sound – the wheels can squeak so finding the cans of oil is a must. Once you find items like the pipe or hatchet then you can defend yourself should two or maybe three approach, any more and death is certain. After a couple of these encounters that horror element begins to fade, and in doing so you start to wade through them. So why not be sneakier you ask? Well, you’re given fewer and fewer chances to do so, some encounters are just unavoidable.

A shame really as this would’ve suited a more thoughtful playstyle. VR Bros has included elements that perfectly tailor to this, the clunky old-fashioned torch to peer into the dark corners and eats through batteries. The storage box can only carry so many items and won’t close if you overfill it. Or the stun grenades you can build with spare parts to knock the dolls out for a moment. There are flourishes of really great design, it just needs to be a bit scarier.

A Wake Inn

A Wake Inn does have its good parts, and then there are the glitches. These slowly start to crop up and range from a floating key that has just unlocked a door, or levers which don’t always work, to more major moments like the complete disappearance of the left wheel. No idea where it went, might have wanted to go in a different direction but it wasn’t there. Fortunately, the wheelchair stayed upright but using the wheels for motion was a no go until a save reload sorted it.

This is why A Wake Inn is such a mixed bag, like grabbing a couple of sweets out of an assortment getting one you love and one you don’t. There are points where A Wake Inn provides some superb VR design more games should have and it never felt like there was nothing to do. But clunky elements stutter the experience making it less refined. It was close to being a great VR title, instead, falling into the average horror crowd.

Source: https://www.vrfocus.com/2021/02/review-a-wake-inn/

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‘Superhot VR’ on Quest Surpasses 1 Million Units Sold, Quest 2 Sales Outperform All Platforms

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Superhot VR (2016) has long been held up as one of the ‘must-have’ VR games. Now the studio announced it’s just tipped the one million mark for units sold on the Oculus Quest platform.

Superhot VR is a virtual reality success story if we’ve ever heard one. Taking the same mechanics from the studio’s viral hit Superhot (2016), its VR counterpart offers up an addictive mix of cinematic slow-motion action scenes as you physically bust up the hordes of oncoming red crystalline enemies.

Superhot Team announced the news in blogpost, celebrating the PC game’s fifth year birthday. There’s no word on exactly how much of this is owed to sales on Quest 2, Facebook’s recently launched follow-up to the standalone headset, but we have a rough idea.

The graph below (provided by Superhot Team) represents all Superhot franchise games sold to date. In the purple you can see Superhot VR, which saw a significant bump in sales with the release of Quest in May 2019—nearly twice as much than the flatscreen game its its viral heyday in 2016.

Image courtesy of Superhot Team

That even larger spike in sales in late 2020 was on Christmas Day, which the studio notes was the day when more copies of Superhot VR were sold than ever before. This is undoubtedly a result of new Oculus Quest 2 owners buying the game en masse for their first VR experience.

What’s more, at $25 (currently on sale for 30% off), that puts gross revenue somewhere topping out at $25 million. There have been regulars sales and bundles, so that’s only a conservative estimate on the high side though, but it’s a number that makes VR development sound pretty attractive.

It’s no secret however that Quest 2 has accelerated sales in many games on the Oculus Store. Facebook announced recently that the plucky $300 standalone helped generate over $1 million in sales for over 60 Quest apps, making for about a third of all apps on the official store. Meanwhile, Quest 2 has leaped to the second most-used VR headset on Steam, owed to its ability to use Oculus Link and a VR-ready PC.

The post ‘Superhot VR’ on Quest Surpasses 1 Million Units Sold, Quest 2 Sales Outperform All Platforms appeared first on Road to VR.

Source: https://www.roadtovr.com/superhot-vr-quest-1-million/

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AR/VR

‘Superhot VR’ on Quest Surpasses 1 Million Units Sold, Quest 2 Sales Outperform All Platforms

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Superhot VR (2016) has long been held up as one of the ‘must-have’ VR games. Now the studio announced it’s just tipped the one million mark for units sold on the Oculus Quest platform.

Superhot VR is a virtual reality success story if we’ve ever heard one. Taking the same mechanics from the studio’s viral hit Superhot (2016), its VR counterpart offers up an addictive mix of cinematic slow-motion action scenes as you physically bust up the hordes of oncoming red crystalline enemies.

Superhot Team announced the news in blogpost, celebrating the PC game’s fifth year birthday. There’s no word on exactly how much of this is owed to sales on Quest 2, Facebook’s recently launched follow-up to the standalone headset, but we have a rough idea.

The graph below (provided by Superhot Team) represents all Superhot franchise games sold to date. In the purple you can see Superhot VR, which saw a significant bump in sales with the release of Quest in May 2019—nearly twice as much than the flatscreen game its its viral heyday in 2016.

Image courtesy of Superhot Team

That even larger spike in sales in late 2020 was on Christmas Day, which the studio notes was the day when more copies of Superhot VR were sold than ever before. This is undoubtedly a result of new Oculus Quest 2 owners buying the game en masse for their first VR experience.

What’s more, at $25 (currently on sale for 30% off), that puts gross revenue somewhere topping out at $25 million. There have been regulars sales and bundles, so that’s only a conservative estimate on the high side though, but it’s a number that makes VR development sound pretty attractive.

It’s no secret however that Quest 2 has accelerated sales in many games on the Oculus Store. Facebook announced recently that the plucky $300 standalone helped generate over $1 million in sales for over 60 Quest apps, making for about a third of all apps on the official store. Meanwhile, Quest 2 has leaped to the second most-used VR headset on Steam, owed to its ability to use Oculus Link and a VR-ready PC.

The post ‘Superhot VR’ on Quest Surpasses 1 Million Units Sold, Quest 2 Sales Outperform All Platforms appeared first on Road to VR.

Source: https://www.roadtovr.com/superhot-vr-quest-1-million/

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