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Digital Banking: The EastWest Bank in the Philippines to Launch Online-Only Komo Banking Solution

East-West Banking Corporation (EastWest) (PSE: EW), the eleventh largest bank in the Philippines with over $6 billion in assets, has introduced its own fully-digital bank, Komo. The company claims that it’s the first universal banking group in the country to establish its own all-digital bank,… Read More

The post Digital Banking: The EastWest Bank in the Philippines to Launch Online-Only Komo Banking Solution appeared first on Crowdfund Insider.

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East-West Banking Corporation (EastWest) (PSE: EW), the eleventh largest bank in the Philippines with over $6 billion in assets, has introduced its own fully-digital bank, Komo.

The company claims that it’s the first universal banking group in the country to establish its own all-digital bank, as it aims to move forward with its updated retail banking strategy.

The Komo digital banking platform is being offered via EastWest’s wholly-owned subsidiary, EastWest Rural Bank. The initiative is reportedly financed by an established and reputable local bank. It will pay an annual interest rate of 3% for its digital savings account without requiring a minimum balance.

Founded in 1994, EastWest is among the fast-growing banks in the Philippines and has managed to remain profitable.  The institution’s virtual banking project is part of its digital transformation strategy and increased focus on adopting the latest technologies, as consumer requirements are changing rapidly.

Tony Moncupa, CEO at EastWest CEO, stated.

“Komo combines the best of two worlds: the convenience of modern digital banking backed by the security of a strong brick-and-mortar bank like EastWest.” 

He further noted:

“We see a digital future in banking. With Komo, our customers are sure to get the best that digital banking has to offer while being confident that their money is in good hands.”

More than 10 million Filipino adults are using online-only banks according to a recent survey report. The Philippine National Bank has made changes to its procedures in order to offer more digital banking and contactless payments services to prevent the further spread of COVID-19.

Isabelle Yap, head of the Komo Project, remarked:

“We would like to help accelerate digital banking adoption in the county. We hope that with Komo’s competitive rates, zero to minimal fees, and convenient platforms we can contribute to the effort.”

Komo has been approved by Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP), the nation’s central bank, to establish its digital bank services in the country.

The Komo platform is scheduled to launch during Q3 2020.

Source: https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2020/05/161804-digital-banking-the-eastwest-bank-in-the-philippines-to-launch-online-only-komo-banking-solution/

Cannabis

British newborn first baby in world to join cannabis therapy trial

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A newborn boy who was delivered by emergency caesarean section in March at a Norwich hospital became the first baby in the world to join a cannabis-derived treatment trial.

The study is the first step in what researchers say could one day lead to a cannabis-derived medicine being used routinely in neonatal care to help babies at risk of seizures and brain injury.

The baby, Oscar Parodi, was delivered on 11 March at Norfolk and Norwich university hospital (NNUH). He was unexpectedly born in a poor condition and needed to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he had cooling therapy for 72 hours.

His mother, Chelsea Parodi, from Watton, Norfolk, said: “I was approached after the birth about taking part in this study and I consulted my mum and my brother who is training to be a paramedic. It was hard but I wanted to do everything I could to help my baby boy. Oscar was in hospital for nine days and he was being monitored 24/7.” Parodi said her son was “doing fantastically well”.

The study is examining whether the medicine is safe and effective in lessening the degree of brain injury for babies with the condition neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

Prof Paul Clarke, a consultant neonatologist at NNUH, said there was a lot of excitement at the neonatal intensive care unit. “This is the first time a cannabis-derived medicine has been tested intravenously in human babies. It is hoped that it will be good for preventing seizures and protecting the brains of newborn babies with HIE.

“We have always had good support from families wanting to take part in research on our [unit] and they often do it from an altruistic point of view to help benefit future babies. One of the attractions of this trial for parents is the closer brain monitoring babies get as part of the study, because a more advanced brainwave monitor is used for the trial babies. This gives parents more reassurance that any seizures will be picked up.”

A second child, born in April at the hospital, is also part of the trial. Children in the trial receive standard hypothermia treatment for HIE, where the whole body is cooled down to 33.5C, as well as a single dose of the study drug or placebo, followed by some tests to measure levels of the drug in the blood.

The trial, in which the drug is administered intravenously and in which the first babies to take part only receive a 30th of the usual dose, involves other neonatal intensive care units in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and will take a year to complete.

Babies in the trial will be given a single dose of study medication, or a placebo, as soon as possible within 12 hours of birth.

The therapeutic ingredient of the medicine occurs naturally in the cannabis plant and is extracted under highly controlled conditions to ensure that the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component which causes a “high” is minimal.

Clarke added: “As with any study of a new medicine there may be unexpected side effects…

Source: https://mmpconnect.com/british-newborn-first-baby-in-world-to-join-cannabis-therapy-trial/

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Cannabis

British newborn first baby in world to join cannabis therapy trial

Published

on

A newborn boy who was delivered by emergency caesarean section in March at a Norwich hospital became the first baby in the world to join a cannabis-derived treatment trial.

The study is the first step in what researchers say could one day lead to a cannabis-derived medicine being used routinely in neonatal care to help babies at risk of seizures and brain injury.

The baby, Oscar Parodi, was delivered on 11 March at Norfolk and Norwich university hospital (NNUH). He was unexpectedly born in a poor condition and needed to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he had cooling therapy for 72 hours.

His mother, Chelsea Parodi, from Watton, Norfolk, said: “I was approached after the birth about taking part in this study and I consulted my mum and my brother who is training to be a paramedic. It was hard but I wanted to do everything I could to help my baby boy. Oscar was in hospital for nine days and he was being monitored 24/7.” Parodi said her son was “doing fantastically well”.

The study is examining whether the medicine is safe and effective in lessening the degree of brain injury for babies with the condition neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

Prof Paul Clarke, a consultant neonatologist at NNUH, said there was a lot of excitement at the neonatal intensive care unit. “This is the first time a cannabis-derived medicine has been tested intravenously in human babies. It is hoped that it will be good for preventing seizures and protecting the brains of newborn babies with HIE.

“We have always had good support from families wanting to take part in research on our [unit] and they often do it from an altruistic point of view to help benefit future babies. One of the attractions of this trial for parents is the closer brain monitoring babies get as part of the study, because a more advanced brainwave monitor is used for the trial babies. This gives parents more reassurance that any seizures will be picked up.”

A second child, born in April at the hospital, is also part of the trial. Children in the trial receive standard hypothermia treatment for HIE, where the whole body is cooled down to 33.5C, as well as a single dose of the study drug or placebo, followed by some tests to measure levels of the drug in the blood.

The trial, in which the drug is administered intravenously and in which the first babies to take part only receive a 30th of the usual dose, involves other neonatal intensive care units in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and will take a year to complete.

Babies in the trial will be given a single dose of study medication, or a placebo, as soon as possible within 12 hours of birth.

The therapeutic ingredient of the medicine occurs naturally in the cannabis plant and is extracted under highly controlled conditions to ensure that the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component which causes a “high” is minimal.

Clarke added: “As with any study of a new medicine there may be unexpected side effects…

Source: https://mmpconnect.com/british-newborn-first-baby-in-world-to-join-cannabis-therapy-trial/

Continue Reading

Cannabis

British newborn first baby in world to join cannabis therapy trial

Published

on

A newborn boy who was delivered by emergency caesarean section in March at a Norwich hospital became the first baby in the world to join a cannabis-derived treatment trial.

The study is the first step in what researchers say could one day lead to a cannabis-derived medicine being used routinely in neonatal care to help babies at risk of seizures and brain injury.

The baby, Oscar Parodi, was delivered on 11 March at Norfolk and Norwich university hospital (NNUH). He was unexpectedly born in a poor condition and needed to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he had cooling therapy for 72 hours.

His mother, Chelsea Parodi, from Watton, Norfolk, said: “I was approached after the birth about taking part in this study and I consulted my mum and my brother who is training to be a paramedic. It was hard but I wanted to do everything I could to help my baby boy. Oscar was in hospital for nine days and he was being monitored 24/7.” Parodi said her son was “doing fantastically well”.

The study is examining whether the medicine is safe and effective in lessening the degree of brain injury for babies with the condition neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

Prof Paul Clarke, a consultant neonatologist at NNUH, said there was a lot of excitement at the neonatal intensive care unit. “This is the first time a cannabis-derived medicine has been tested intravenously in human babies. It is hoped that it will be good for preventing seizures and protecting the brains of newborn babies with HIE.

“We have always had good support from families wanting to take part in research on our [unit] and they often do it from an altruistic point of view to help benefit future babies. One of the attractions of this trial for parents is the closer brain monitoring babies get as part of the study, because a more advanced brainwave monitor is used for the trial babies. This gives parents more reassurance that any seizures will be picked up.”

A second child, born in April at the hospital, is also part of the trial. Children in the trial receive standard hypothermia treatment for HIE, where the whole body is cooled down to 33.5C, as well as a single dose of the study drug or placebo, followed by some tests to measure levels of the drug in the blood.

The trial, in which the drug is administered intravenously and in which the first babies to take part only receive a 30th of the usual dose, involves other neonatal intensive care units in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and will take a year to complete.

Babies in the trial will be given a single dose of study medication, or a placebo, as soon as possible within 12 hours of birth.

The therapeutic ingredient of the medicine occurs naturally in the cannabis plant and is extracted under highly controlled conditions to ensure that the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component which causes a “high” is minimal.

Clarke added: “As with any study of a new medicine there may be unexpected side effects…

Source: https://mmpconnect.com/british-newborn-first-baby-in-world-to-join-cannabis-therapy-trial/

Continue Reading

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