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Cybersecurity Degrees in Wyoming

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Cybersecurity Degrees in Wyoming- This brochure provides a high-level overview of cybersecurity in Wyoming, as well as employment and educational options. The economic changes in Wyoming, their forecast, and how they effect the cybersecurity profession will also be covered in this guide.

The adoption of cybersecurity in Wyoming has opened up new possibilities for the state’s ranchlands. Its economy is based mostly on coal, natural gas, and oil shale mining excavations. According to the Wyoming Department of Employment, Wyoming’s income is based on mineral production, making the state a very valued resource for the country’s energy capability.

Wyoming is known as the Cowboy State because of its vast grounds that are ideal for livestock farming, with cattle being the state’s most valuable resource. Wheat, oats, barley, corn, sugar beets, beans, and potatoes are among Wyoming’s exports. According to the Department of Agriculture, over three-quarters of the state’s cropland is irrigated on a regular basis, and majority of the state’s production is concentrated in the southeast, with only 10,000 farms owing to yearly precipitation.

However, as a result of the internet age, cybersecurity provides the state with an opportunity for quick, dynamic industry and trade. Wyoming’s financial, energy, telecommunications, and emergency response infrastructures have become more reliant on information systems. As individuals want security and protection for their data, job possibilities in cybersecurity continue to grow in Wyoming.

With the state’s attractions, including as Yellowstone National Park and Independence Rock, bringing in a regular stream of visitors, cybersecurity opens up new options. According to Forbes, despite being the least populous state in the US, its job growth has been 1.3 percent, and the federal government owns approximately half of the state’s acreage. The federal government’s control over the state’s territory necessitates a more progressive approach to cybersecurity, allowing federal workers to examine data and make changes that affect state-level jurisdiction.

Table of Contents

Growing Awareness of Cybersecurity in Wyoming

The state’s Cyber Response and Infrastructure Support Program (CRISP) was created to move the state’s attention away from acquiring technology and toward developing cybersecurity services to secure key data and information systems. A key component of the strategy is incident response and training, which has been a priority since 2015. According to the Department of Enterprise Technology Services, the department adopted a cybersecurity strategy for defending agencies and stakeholders during the fiscal years 2017 and 2018. This was in response to an increase in cyber threats to Wyoming citizens.

The Emersion Data Center houses a data support centre as well as a multi-purpose office facility where technology and hardware are housed. The state is now consolidating the data centre and boosting the electricity to 480 volts to accommodate the servers and storage systems. The ETS adopted and refurbished the data centre through colocation agreements with Wyoming enterprises to help finance expenditures and modernise its computer resources as part of the Capitol Square Project.

The state also launched the Risk Assessment Initiative to ensure secure computing environments for agencies during the 2017-18 fiscal year. This effort aids organisations in building risk assessment plans and prioritises measurement in project planning. The Wyoming Unified Network continues to grow, allowing agencies to connect to enterprise resources and cut production costs through its data centres.

In 2014, ETS launched the Wyo4Life project, which allows K-12 school districts, community colleges, and universities to use Google Apps for Education to promote technology, computing, and cybersecurity coursework. The Wyoming Government Cloud Initiative enables partners like Microsoft Azure and Silver Star Communications invest in technology for future generations by providing a secure cloud.

Cybersecurity Degrees in Wyoming

The state of Wyoming offers a diverse range of cybersecurity-related programmes and credentials.

ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

Casper College offers an associate’s degree and an associate of applied science in cybersecurity, with a focus on business assurance as a marketable asset for job employment and advancement. The associate degree offered by the college is intended to serve as a bridge to higher education. The associate of applied science, on the other hand, lays the groundwork for I.T. support without the option of transferring credits. The associate of applied science degree also qualifies students for CCENT certification.

“Cybersecurity is an ever-changing subject of research. It’s built to keep up with the ever-changing demands of cyberspace threats and vulnerabilities. If you enjoy the challenge of constantly changing learning possibilities, we encourage you to join us at Casper College and participate in this exciting field of study.”

Laramie County Community College offers an associate of applied science degree that prepares students for professions protecting financial information, personal data, and trade secrets from cyber attacks, with a concentration on general cybersecurity instruction. Students will be able to conduct vulnerability assessments, apply cryptography to computer networking, implement computer security procedures, and analyse information systems as part of this degree.

The Cyber Security AAS Program at Sheridan College prepares students for a career in computer network and Internet security. Risk analysis, network monitoring, security software, and emergency plan response are all talents that can be developed with this degree. Certifications such as Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) Security Fundamentals, CompTIA Security+, and Cisco CCNA Security provide hands-on expertise.

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

Bachelor’s degrees in cybersecurity provide students with substantial understanding in networking infrastructure, computer science, and data management, which is valuable to potential employers. Bachelor’s degrees include a variety of subjects in addition to the typical information security curriculum, and students can earn their degrees in a variety of ways.

MASTER’S DEGREE

Master’s degrees in cybersecurity assist students with bachelor’s degrees in computer science, engineering, or mathematics in furthering their studies. Master’s degrees enable students to take advantage of cybersecurity opportunities and study networking, data, and information choices.

Cybersecurity Certifications in Wyoming

In addition, Casper College and Sheridan College also offer cybersecurity credentials.

The Computer Security Certificate from Casper College teaches students the fundamentals of network security, operating systems, Internet networking, and computer forensics in order to diagnose, protect, and prevent computer networking problems. Students will learn about file settings, security approaches, recovering digital evidence, and operating systems throughout their studies.

Sheridan College offers advanced cybersecurity training for students who have already completed coursework in computer networking and information technology. The certificate focuses on dangers to computer systems, regulations governing computer systems, and reinforcing computer systems for safety. The curriculum is meant to help students move into the college’s AAS degree programme.

Cybersecurity Jobs in Wyoming

As supercomputers and data centres sprout up all across the state, cybersecurity professionals will be needed to keep expanding networks and technology to schools and other locations. The state’s energy sector’s steady decline emphasises the need for technology-based jobs. Technology enterprises can expect consistent employment for future infrastructure and development thanks to the state’s accomplishments in early-education computer science.

According to Cyberseek, the cybersecurity sector employs around 1,202 people in Wyoming, with 516 job vacancies.

In the realm of cybersecurity, there are a few more observations to make:

Supply Currently, there is a scarcity of cybersecurity jobs. The supply/demand ratio for workers is 2.3, whereas the national average is 2.0, both of which are extremely low figures.

Location In comparison to the national average of 1.0, Wyoming has a location quotient of 0.70. Wyoming’s employment options are limited but growing as a result of the expansion of cybersecurity measures in the last few years.

Certifications Certifications such as CompTIA Security+, Global InformationAssurance Certification (GIAC), and Certified Information Systems Security Professional are required by state and company regulations for employment (CISSP).

The following are some of the most popular job titles among current employees:

The average hourly income for a cybersecurity analyst in Wyoming is $34.33, with an annual average wage of $71,400, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Cybersecurity in Wyoming

Wyoming’s economic transition from mining and cattle to information technology is now modest, but it will have a significant impact on inhabitants’ living conditions in a few of years. Wyoming’s concentration on education programmes and cybersecurity activities serves to boost potential value for entering enterprises in need of data security measures, even though the state’s industry sectors haven’t changed dramatically.

The enormous fields of agriculture and energy production are continuing to be traded for business infrastructure and financial expansion as a result of digital technologies. For businesses to communicate, exchange, evaluate, and measure the supply and demand for their services, data has become critical. Cybersecurity aids with the maintenance of these transactions and has the potential to create new jobs for future generations.


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Source: https://cybersguards.com/cybersecurity-degrees-in-wyoming/

Cyber Security

How to Sell Cybersecurity

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How to Sell Cybersecurity- We spoke with professionals to learn how they presently offer cybersecurity and information security goods and services to their clients.

Let’s look at seven of these tried-and-true ways that you may use right now:

Understand the Requirements of Different Industries

Different sectors have their own set of standards and compliance regulations to adhere to. For example, the security procedures that a healthcare organisation must follow are vastly different from those that a law firm or accountant should consider.

Your offer will most likely differ depending on who you’re selling your cybersecurity services to.

As a result, it’s critical for cybersecurity companies to understand the verticals in which they market.

You know more about security than they do, so research the laws and regulations for yourself. Find out what particular firms are needed to do, and whether their location has an impact on what is required.

You’ll be able to segment your prospects into separate lists more easily after that.

You can construct Smart Views in Close, for example, that automatically group leads together depending on your criteria. As a result, you can establish divisions based on industry, region, or any other significant feature. You may quickly change and amend those criteria, and your dynamic lead lists will update in real time.

Build and maintain a wide network online and offline

Your prospects are continually inundated with messages from a variety of sources, some of which are genuine and others which are spam.

So, how do you get others to pay attention to you? In a world of “spammy” security messaging, how can you stand out as a legitimate solution?

According to Magda Chelly of Responsible Cyber,

Making connections and maintaining relationships with your customers can be the key to success for most businesses. By continuously building a network of colleagues, business partners, and more, you are ensuring that whenever you need a strong pipeline and a definite lead, you can call upon your network to help you. One of my colleagues mentioned, you build relationships when you are interested in people, not when you make people interested in you.

It’s critical to be real whether you’re building your network online or offline. If you’re a salesperson who isn’t. You sell your prospect on yourself by selling nothing.

Apozy’s Rick Deacon adds, “Genuine, valuable information and good dialogue can lead to a new client.” “The issue is that individuals are phoney and ‘market-y,’ and it doesn’t work for them. It’s crucial to be someone who others want to talk to.”

You could, for example:

  • Use LinkedIn to share useful material.
  • Attend (or host!) a virtual event in your field.
  • Interviews on podcasts and shows hosted by notable people in your field are a great way to get your name out there.

Provide material that starts fresh dialogues and helps you extend your network to draw your audience to you. Make yourself the person people want to speak with.

Become an Educator and Security Consultant

You’ll be in a better position to educate your prospects after you understand the various security standards that different sectors must follow.

Many firms are unconcerned about protecting themselves from cyberattacks, but they recognise the necessity of adhering to regulatory rules. They’re probably aware that they’re not well-informed.

That’s where you, as the hero, come in: you can assist them cut through the legalese and figure out what’s really expected of them.

You establish yourself as an information security specialist by serving as an advisor and lecturer. This strategy helps you create trust with your prospects, and they’ll likely recognise they need your support on their own.

Ask Questions that Reveal Needs they didn’t Know they had

People, on the whole, despise being told what to do or what they require.

So, rather than trying to persuade or persuade your prospects that they require better security solutions, ask them questions to enable them arrive to their own conclusions. You could, for example, ask queries like:

  • Are you up to date on your industry’s regulations?
  • Are you safe from internal dangers and unintentional leaks?
  • How safe is it for you to share documents and communicate internally?
  • How do you deal with security issues posed by remote workers?
  • Do you have a plan in place to deal with an incident?

You can help your prospects recognise they aren’t entirely prepared for the hazards by discussing these and other questions.

They’ll be more receptive to hearing about your options after that.

Concentrate on how Your Product Helps them run their Business

Remember that fear tactics don’t work in real life. Instead of using fear to sell your goods or service, utilise value.

As a result, you’ll be able to focus less on what you do and more on what it accomplishes for them.

Here’s what Responsible Cyber’s Magda Chelly does:

I summarize the benefits and value of the product that I am offering using regulatory requirements and use cases. This usually works in our industry, as depending on where the customers are, the awareness might be very different.

In the field of cybersecurity, use cases and case studies can be extremely useful. Because your prospects may not fully comprehend their demands or what they can achieve with your product or services, it is your responsibility to offer them real-world instances of the outcomes they could expect. This is a great storytelling technique that can assist you in closing more business.

Use use cases that are relevant to their industry to help them reach that “aha” moment.

Keep their Priorities in Mind

When it comes to security, each company has its own priorities and objectives. Perhaps they wish to give their consumers more trust by adopting infosec products or services to better protect their data. Perhaps they don’t want to get fined if they don’t follow the rules. Perhaps they’re looking for ways to keep a newly remote crew safe.

Before you start pitching, you should figure out what this prospect’s top priorities are.

Consider how you may begin your pitch by emphasising the need of printer security. After a few minutes of talking, you learn that this prospect has lately transferred the bulk of their teams to the cloud and has eliminated the majority of their printers. Security solutions for their remote staff were what they really required.

Don’t be that person.

Instead, concentrate on their priorities first, then build your proposal around their company. This will not only save you time and efforts, but it will also increase your chances of piqueing their attention.

Don’t be Frightened to show your Vulnerability

Is it true that you can guarantee 100 percent security?

Come on, now, tell it how it is.

If your prospects are familiar with cybersecurity, they understand that there is no such thing as 100 percent security. If that’s all you have to offer, you’ll quickly lose any trust people had in you.

Instead, make an effort to be vulnerable.

Here’s what Apozy’s Rick Deacon has done:

We close deals by being vulnerable and upfront with our product’s efficacy and execution. To prove you can do what you say, you need to show a technical person what it does, how it does it, and what the real outcome is while not pretending you fix every problem they face.

Pretend you’re a silver bullet who can solve any security issue that arises. Even if a prospect isn’t familiar with cybersecurity, they’ll recognise that something that seems too good to be true almost always is.

So, be truthful and true to yourself. Make it clear to your prospects that perfect security isn’t a realistic aim. Demonstrate how you can assist them in anticipating dangers and being prepared to fight or respond to cyberattacks. In sales, practise radical candour.

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Cyber Security

Android Banking Trojan Relies on Screen Recording and Keylogging Instead of HTML

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According to security experts at ThreatFabric, a newly found Android banking Trojan captures login credentials via screen recording and keylogging rather than HTML overlays.

The malware, dubbed Vultur and originally discovered in March 2021, uses AlphaVNC’s VNC (Virtual Network Computing) implementation to get full visibility into the victim system. Remote access to the device’s VNC server is provided by ngrok, which uses secure tunnels to expose endpoints behind NATs and firewalls to the Internet.

According to ThreatFabric, the mobile malware uses Accessibility Services to identify the programme running in the foreground and begins screen recording if the app is in the target list. Vultur is projecting the screen while masquerading as a programme called Protection Guard, an operation visible in the notification panel.

While Android banking Trojans are known to use the Accessibility Services to carry out criminal operations, they often use HTML overlays to deceive users into exposing their login details. Vultur does use overlay to get all of the permissions it needs to execute unimpeded on the infected device.

The malware also makes advantage of Accessibility Services to log all of the keys that the user taps on the screen and to prevent the victim from manually uninstalling the infection. The virus auto-clicks the back button to return the user to the main screen when the user accesses the app’s information screen in settings.

Vultur is a banking application that primarily targets consumers in Australia, Italy, and Spain. Some victims were also seen in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, but to a considerably smaller extent. The malware is also highly interested in stealing crypto-wallet credentials and keeps a close eye on social networking apps.

Vultur looks to be tied to Brunhilda, a privately managed dropper that previously transmitted Alien, a variant of the Cerberus banking malware that was discovered in Google Play several months ago, according to ThreatFabric.

The Brunhilda sample connected with Vultur (it has the same icon, package name, and command and control server as a Vultur sample) has over 5.000 instals, out of a total of more than 30.000 Brunhilda droppers are estimated to have had through Google Play and unofficial stores.

The post Android Banking Trojan Relies on Screen Recording and Keylogging Instead of HTML appeared first on Cybers Guards.
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Source: https://cybersguards.com/android-banking-trojan-relies-on-screen-recording-and-keylogging-instead-of-html/

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Cyber Security

Chinese-Speaking Threat Actor Targeting Microsoft Exchange Vulnerabilities

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According to Kaspersky, a previously unknown Chinese-speaking threat actor is targeting Microsoft Exchange vulnerabilities in an attempt to compromise high-profile victims.

The long-running operation known as GhostEmperor concentrates on Southeast Asian targets and employs a previously unknown Windows kernel-mode rootkit.

According to Kaspersky, GhostEmperor uses a loading technique that relies on a component of the Cheat Engine open-source project to get around Windows Driver Signature Enforcement and install its rootkit.

Kaspersky security researchers uncovered the use of “a sophisticated multi-stage malware framework targeted at allowing remote control over the infected machines” during their examination into the activities.

The threat actor targeted various entities in Southeast Asia, including governmental organisations and telecom companies, according to Kaspersky. The toolset first appeared in July 2020, with the threat actor targeting various entities in Southeast Asia, including governmental organisations and telecom companies.

While looking into numerous efforts targeting Exchange servers, Kaspersky discovered the GhostEmperor cluster of activity.

Several threat actors targeted a set of Exchange vulnerabilities that Microsoft publicly reported in March this year, with the majority of the attacks being blamed on Chinese opponents.

Last Monday, the US and its allies publicly accused China of the assaults.

GhostEmperor, on the other hand, is a wholly new adversary, according to Kaspersky, with no resemblance to established threat actors.

“GhostEmperor is a great example of how fraudsters are always looking for new ways to exploit weaknesses and new strategies to deploy. They added additional issues to the already well-established trend of assaults against Microsoft Exchange servers by using a previously unknown, sophisticated rootkit,” said David Emm, a security analyst at Kaspersky.

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Cyber Security

Guardicore Labs are Sharing Details of a Critical Vulnerability in Hyper-V

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Microsoft addressed a significant vulnerability in Hyper-V in May 2021, according to security experts at Guardicore Labs.

The security vulnerability, identified as CVE-2021-28476 with a CVSS score of 9.9, affects Hyper-virtual V’s network switch driver (vmswitch.sys) and might be used to gain remote code execution or create a denial of service scenario.

Microsoft employs Hyper-V as the core virtualization technology for Azure. Hyper-V is a native hypervisor that provides virtualization features for both desktop and cloud systems.

Because it first surfaced in a vmswitch build in August 2019, the security flaw found by Guardicore Labs (in partnership with SafeBreach Labs) was likely in production for more than a year. Windows 7, 8.1, and 10 are all affected, as well as Windows Server 2008, 2012, 2016, and 2019.

By delivering a forged packet to the Hyper-V host, an attacker with an Azure virtual machine might exploit the security flaw. As a result, the attacker might have run code on the Hyper-V host, potentially bringing down entire cloud regions.

“Because Hyper-V is Azure’s hypervisor, a vulnerability in Hyper-V also affects Azure, and can compromise entire regions of the public cloud. According to a Guardicore Labs research, “triggering denial of service from an Azure VM would crash significant elements of Azure’s infrastructure and knock down all virtual machines that share the same host.”

According to the security researchers, an attacker who is able to exploit the vulnerability to gain remote code execution – a more complex exploitation chain – could gain control of the host and the VMs running on it, gaining access to sensitive information and the ability to run malicious payloads or perform other nefarious operations.

The problem exists because vmswitch does not validate the value of OID requests before processing them, and so may dereference an invalid pointer.

According to Guardicore Labs, there are two exploitation scenarios: one in which an incorrect pointer causes the Hyper-V host to crash, and another in which the host’s kernel reads from a memory-mapped device register and executes code.

“What made this vulnerability so fatal was the combination of a hypervisor bug – an arbitrary pointer dereference – and a design defect allowing an overly permissive communication channel between the guest and the host,” the researchers explained.

The post Guardicore Labs are Sharing Details of a Critical Vulnerability in Hyper-V appeared first on Cybers Guards.
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Source: https://cybersguards.com/guardicore-labs-are-sharing-details-of-a-critical-vulnerability-in-hyper-v/

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