Connect with us

Biotechnology

ClientEd Surpasses 230 Pet Medication Handouts to Help California…

Avatar

Published

on

News Image

“To increase understanding of pet medication information,” says Dr. Stephenson, “all ClientEd handouts are written in plain language to ensure all pet owners can benefit from the pet information being shared.”

To help California veterinary practices easily comply with Lizzie’s Law (Section 4829.5 of the Business and Professions Code), LifeLearn Animal Health’s client education resource, ClientEd, now has more than 230 pet medication handouts that cover the consultation requirements now required by California law.

“The current crisis has certainly brought the need for time savings and improved efficiency to the forefront for practices to adapt and thrive in these challenging times,” says Dr. Mark Stephenson, LifeLearn’s Chief Veterinary Officer. “From ClientEd’s beginnings in 1995 as a trusted client education resource, the main purpose of ClientEd was to save practices time and improve efficiency while increasing compliance. To that end, ClientEd included some 90 drug information handouts for clients by 1999. Today, we’re happy to say we’ve almost tripled that number, providing a robust, ready-to-go resource for practices to meet California’s new pet medication compliance law.”

The change to the California Business and Professions Code was sparked by the unfortunate death of a Yorkshire terrier named Lizzie, whose death was a result of complications from renal failure.

As part of minimum consultation requirements, California veterinarians must now provide detailed pet medication information to pet owners each time a medication is initially provided or prescribed in an outpatient setting. Veterinarians must also provide a paper copy of the information if clients ask for it.

“To increase understanding of pet medication information,” says Dr. Stephenson, “all ClientEd handouts are written in plain language to ensure all pet owners can benefit from the pet information being shared.”

Designed specifically for effective client education, ClientEd’s library has more than 2,100 pet health handouts written and reviewed by animal health experts. Handouts are easily shared in print to serve practices offering curbside care or emailed directly from the ClientEd platform and some practice management software to serve physical distancing. Of ClientEd’s 230-plus pet medication handouts, 50 new pet medication handouts have been added over the past year, and 152 have been updated to provide the information required by Lizzie’s Law. And LifeLearn continues to add and update medication handouts to the ClientEd library on a regular basis.

About LifeLearn Animal Health

LifeLearn provides flexible and customizable online software solutions for veterinary practices to improve efficiency, save time, increase appointments, adapt, and thrive in a competitive new veterinary landscape. Every solution comes with a no-fuss setup. LifeLearn does the work for you, which makes implementation easy.

LifeLearn’s solutions include Communication (WebDVM, ALLYDVM), Education (Sofie, ClientEd, VetFolio), Telemedicine (Petriage, PetNurse), and Industry Solutions (custom digital education and communications products and services).

LifeLearn’s award-winning competencies in digital media, combined with longstanding veterinary content expertise, are just part of why LifeLearn continues to be a leading and trusted name in the animal health industry.

http://www.lifelearn.com | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | Instagram

For more information, contact:

LifeLearn

Ed Casagrande, Vice President of Marketing

(800) 375-7994, ext. 244

Share article on social media or email:

Source: https://www.prweb.com/releases/cliented_surpasses_230_pet_medication_handouts_to_help_california_veterinarians_easily_comply_with_lizzies_law/prweb17191712.htm

Biotechnology

Tyler Jacks, founding director of MIT’s Koch Institute, to step down

Avatar

Published

on

The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center, has announced that Tyler Jacks will step down from his role as director, pending selection of his successor.

“An exceptionally creative scientist and a leader of great vision, Tyler also has a rare gift for launching and managing large, complex organizations, attracting exceptional talent and inspiring philanthropic support,” says MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “We are profoundly grateful for all the ways he has served MIT, including most recently his leadership on the Research Ramp Up Lightning Committee, which made it possible for MIT’s research enterprise to resume in safe ways after the initial Covid shutdown. I offer warmest admiration and best wishes as Tyler steps down from leading the Koch and returns full time to the excitement of the lab.”

Jacks, the David H. Koch Professor of Biology, has served as director for more than 19 years, first for the MIT Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and then for its successor, the Koch Institute. The CCR was founded by Nobel laureate Salvador Luria in 1974, shortly after the federal government declared “war on cancer,” with the mission of unravelling the molecular core of cancer. Jacks became the center’s fourth director in 2001, following Luria, Nobel laureate and Institute Professor Phillip Sharp, and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research Richard Hynes.

Aided by the championship of then-MIT President Susan Hockfield and a gift of $100 million from MIT alumnus David H. Koch ’62, SM ’63, Jacks oversaw the evolution of the Center for Cancer Research into the Koch Institute in 2007 as well as the construction of a new home in Building 76, completed in 2010. The Koch Institute expands the mission of its predecessor by bringing life scientists and engineers together to advance understanding of the basic biology of cancer, and to develop new tools to better diagnose, monitor, and treat the disease.

Under the direction of Jacks, the institute has become an engine of collaborative cancer research at MIT. “Tyler’s vision and execution of a convergent cancer research program has propelled the Koch Institute to the forefront of discovery,” notes Maria Zuber, MIT’s vice president for research.

Bolstered by the Koch Institute’s associate directors Jacqueline Lees, Matthew Vander Heiden, Darrell Irvine, and Dane Wittrup, Jacks oversaw four successful renewals of the coveted NCI-designated cancer center stature, with the last two renewals garnering perfect scores. In 2015, Jacks was the recipient of the James R. Killian Jr. Faculty Achievement Award, the highest honor the MIT faculty can bestow upon one of its members, for his leadership in cancer research and for his role in establishing the Koch Institute.

“Tyler Jacks turned the compelling idea to accelerate progress against cancer by bringing together fundamental biology, engineering know-how, and clinical expertise, into the intensively collaborative environment that is now the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research,” says Hockfield. “His extraordinary leadership has amplified the original idea into a paradigm-changing approach to cancer, which now serves as a model for research centers around the world.”

To support cross-disciplinary research in high-impact areas and expedite translation from the bench to the clinic, Jacks and his colleagues shepherded the creation of numerous centers and programs, among them the Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology, the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, the MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine, the Swanson Biotechnology Center, the Lustgarten Lab for Pancreatic Cancer Research, and the MIT Stem Cell Initiative. In addition, Jacks has co-led the Bridge Project, a collaboration between the Koch Institute and Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center that brings bioengineers, cancer scientists, and clinical oncologists together to solve some of the most challenging problems in cancer research. Jacks has raised nearly $375 million in support of these efforts, as well as the building of the Koch Institute facility, the Koch Institute Frontier Research Program, and other activities.

Jacks first became interested in cancer as a Harvard University undergraduate while attending a lecture by Robert Weinberg, the Daniel K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and member of the Whitehead Institute, who is himself a pioneer in cancer genetics. After earning his PhD at the University of California at San Francisco under the direction of Nobel laureate Harold Varmus, Jacks joined Weinberg’s lab as a postdoctoral fellow. He joined the MIT faculty in 1992 with appointments in the Center for Cancer Research and the Department of Biology.

Jacks is widely considered a leader in the development of engineered mouse models of human cancers, and has pioneered the use of gene-targeting technology to construct mouse models and to study cancer-associated genes in mice. Strains of mice developed in his lab are used by researchers around the world, as well as by neighboring labs within the Koch Institute. Because these models closely resemble human forms of the disease, they have allowed researchers to track how tumors progress and to test new ways to detect and treat cancer. In more recent research, Jacks has been using mouse models to investigate how immune and tumor cells interact during cancer development and how tumors successfully evade immune recognition. This research is expected to lead to new immune-based therapies for human cancer.

Outside his research and MIT leadership, Jacks co-chaired the Blue Ribbon Panel for the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative, chaired the National Cancer Advisory Board of the National Cancer Institute, and is a past president of the American Association for Cancer Research. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Science, the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Jacks serves on the Board of Directors of Amgen and Thermo Fisher Scientific. He is also a co-founder of T2 Biosystems and Dragonfly Therapeutics, serves as an advisor to several other companies, and is a member of the Harvard Board of Overseers.

Sharp will lead the search for the next director of the Koch Institute, with guidance from noted leaders in MIT’s cancer research community, including Hockfield and Hynes, as well as Angela M. Belcher, head of the Department of Biological Engineering and Jason Mason Crafts Professor; Paula T. Hammond, head of the Department of Chemical Engineering and David H. Koch Professor of Engineering; Amy Keating, professor of biology; Robert S. Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor; and David M. Sabatini, Professor of Biology and member, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research.

“Jacks is a renowned scientist whose personal research has changed the prevention and treatment of cancer,” says Sharp. “His contributions to the creation of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and his leadership as its inaugural director have also transformed cancer research at MIT and nationally. By integrating engineers and cancer biologists into a community that shares knowledge and skills, and collaborates with clinical scientists and the private sector, this convergent institute represents the future of biological research in the MIT style.”

After Jacks steps down, he will continue his research in the areas of cancer genetics and immune-oncology and his teaching, while also stewarding the Bridge Project into its second decade.

“It has been a privilege for me to serve as director of the MIT Center for Cancer Research and the Koch Institute for the past two decades and to work alongside many of the brightest minds in cancer research,” says Jacks. “The Koch Institute is a powerhouse of research and innovation, and I look forward to the next generation of leadership in this very special place.”

Source: https://news.mit.edu/2020/tyler-jacks-founding-director-mit-koch-institute-step-down-1026

Continue Reading

Biotechnology

Silencing gene expression to cure complex diseases

Avatar

Published

on

Many people think of new medicines as bullets, and in the pharmaceutical industry, frequently used terms like “targets” and “hits” reinforce that idea. Immuneering co-founder and CEO Ben Zeskind ’03, PhD ’06 prefers a different analogy.

His company, which specializes in bioinformatics and computational biology, sees many effective drugs more like noise-canceling headphones.

Rather than focusing on the DNA and proteins involved in a disease, Immuneering focuses on disease-associated gene signaling and expression data. The company is trying to cancel out those signals like a pair of headphones blocks out unwanted background noise.

The approach is guided by Immuneering’s decade-plus of experience helping large pharmaceutical companies understand the biological mechanisms behind some of their most successful medicines.

“We started noticing some common patterns in terms of how these very successful drugs were working, and eventually we realized we could use these insights to create a platform that would let us identify new medicine,” Zeskind says. “[The idea is] to not just make existing medicines work better but also to create entirely new medicines that work better than anything that has come before.”

In keeping with that idea, Immuneering is currently developing a bold pipeline of drugs aimed at some of the most deadly forms of cancer, in addition to other complex diseases that have proven difficult to treat, like Alzheimer’s. The company’s lead drug candidate, which targets a protein signaling pathway associated with many human cancers, will begin clinical trials within the year.

It’s the first of what Immuneering hopes will be a number of clinical trials enabled by what the company calls its “disease-canceling technology,” which analyzes the gene expression data of diseases and uses computational models to identify small-molecule compounds likely to bind to disease pathways and silence them.

“Our most advanced candidates go after the RAS-RAF-MEK [protein] pathway,” Zeskind explains. “This is a pathway that’s activated in about half of all human cancers. This pathway is incredibly important in a number of the most serious cancers: pancreatic, colorectal, melanoma, lung cancer — a lot of the cancers that have proven tougher to go after. We believe this is one of the largest unsolved problems in human cancer.”

A good foundation

As an undergraduate, Zeskind participated in the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition (the $50K back then) and helped organize some of the MIT Enterprise Forum’s events around entrepreneurship.

“MIT has a unique culture around entrepreneurship,” Zeskind says. “There aren’t many organizations that encourage it and celebrate it the way MIT does. Also, the philosophy of the biological engineering department, of taking problems in biology and analyzing them quantitatively and systematically using principles of engineering, that philosophy really drives our company today.”

Although his PhD didn’t focus on bioinformatics, Zeskind’s coursework did involve some computational analysis and offered a primer on oncology. One course in particular, taught by Doug Lauffenburger, the Ford Professor of Biological Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Biology, resonated with him. The class tasked students with uncovering some of the mechanisms of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) protein, a molecule found in the immune system that’s known to severely limit tumor growth in a small percentage of people with certain cancers.

After Zeskind earned his MBA at Harvard Business School in 2008, he returned to MIT’s campus to talk to Lauffenburger about his idea for a company that would decipher the reasons for IL-2’s success in certain patients. Lauffenburger would go on to join Immuneering’s advisory board.

Of course, due to the financial crisis of 2007-08, that proved to be difficult timing for launching a startup. Without easy access to capital, Zeskind approached pharmaceutical companies to show them some of the insights his team had gained on IL-2. The companies weren’t interested in IL-2, but they were intrigued by Immuneering’s process for uncovering the way it worked.

“At first we thought, ‘We just spent a year figuring out IL-2 and now we have to start from scratch,’” Zeskind recalls. “But then we realized it would be easier the second time around, and that was a real turning point because we realized the company wasn’t about that specific medicine, it was about using data to figure out mechanism.”

In one of the company’s first projects, Immuneering uncovered some of the mechanisms behind an early cancer immunotherapy developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb. In another, they studied the workings of Teva Pharmaceuticals’ drug for multiple sclerosis.

As Immuneering continued working on successful drugs, they began to notice some counterintuitive patterns.

“A lot of the conventional wisdom is to focus on DNA,” Zeskind says. “But what we saw over and over across many different projects was that transcriptomics, or which genes are turned on when — something you measure through RNA levels — was the thing that was most frequently informative about how a drug was working. That ran counter to conventional wisdom.”

In 2018, as Immuneering continued helping companies appreciate that idea in drugs that were already working, it decided to start developing medicines designed from the start to go after disease signals.

Today the company has drug pipelines focused around oncology, immune-oncology, and neuroscience. Zeskind says its disease-canceling technology allows Immuneering to launch new drug programs about twice as fast and with about half the capital as other drug development programs.

“As long as we have a good gene-expression signature from human patient data for a particular disease, we’ll find targets and biological insights that let us go after them in new ways,” he says. “It’s a systematic, quantitative, efficient way to get those biological insights compared to a more traditional process, which involves a lot of trial and error.”

An inspired path

Even as Immuneering advances its drug pipelines, its bioinformatics services business continues to grow. Zeskind attributes that success to the company’s employees, about half of which are MIT alumni — the continuation of trend that began in the early days of the company, when Immuneering was mostly made up of recent MIT PhD graduates and postdocs.

“We were sort of the Navy Seals of bioinformatics, if you will,” Zeskind says. “We’d come in with a small but incredibly well-trained team that knew how to make the most of the data they had available.”

In fact, it’s not lost on Zeskind that his analogy of drugs as noise-canceling headphones has a distinctively MIT spin: He was inspired by longtime MIT professor and Bose Corporation founder Amar Bose.

And Zeskind’s attraction to MIT came long before he ever stepped foot on campus. Growing up, his father, Dale Zeskind ’76, SM ’76, encouraged Ben and his sister Julie ’01, SM ’02 to attend MIT.

Unfortunately, Dale passed away recently after a battle with cancer. But his influence, which included helping to spark a passion for entrepreneurship in his son, is still being felt. Other members of Immuneering’s small team have also lost parents to cancer, adding a personal touch to the work they do every day.

“Especially in the early days, people were taking more risk [joining us over] a large pharma company, but they were having a bigger impact,” Zeskind says. “It’s all about the work: looking at these successful drugs and figuring out why they’re better and seeing if we can improve them.”

Indeed, even as Immuneering’s business model has evolved over the last 12 years, the company has never wavered in its larger mission.

“There’s been a ton of great progress in medicine, but when someone gets a cancer diagnosis, it’s still, more likely than not, very bad news,” Zeskind says. “It’s a real unsolved problem. So by taking a counterintuitive approach and using data, we’re really focused on bringing forward medicines that can have the kind of durable responses that inspired us all those years ago with IL-2. We’re really excited about the impact the medicines we’re developing are going to have.”

Source: https://news.mit.edu/2020/immuneering-gene-expression-1026

Continue Reading

Biotechnology

Universities should lead the way on climate action, MIT panelists say

Avatar

Published

on

Under its Plan for Action on Climate Change, MIT has a goal of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by at least 32 percent below its 2014 emission levels, by 2030. Those reductions are now at 24 percent, and the Institute is track to meet or exceed the goal, said Joe Higgins, vice president for campus services and stewardship, thanks to Institute-wide efforts that benefit from connecting research and operations.

In the fifth of six symposia in the Climate Action series, held Oct. 20, an online panel of MIT experts including Higgins discussed the role of research universities in tackling climate change. Research universities like MIT provide critical technology and policy innovations, the speakers said, but can also act as role models for other institutions.

“Higher education has a responsibility, an opportunity to set their sights on being an exemplar organization and community in how to face, respond to, and address the climate change issue,” said Professor Paula Hammond, head of the Department of Chemical Engineering and a co-chair of the symposium.

The 170 acres of the MIT campus and its affiliate programs are a kind of living laboratory and testbed for climate solutions, “to demonstrate the technology and the choices that we as people make to move the campus forward,” said Krystyn Van Vliet, associate provost and professor of materials science and engineering and of biological engineering.

In one effort to connect research and operations, Higgins and his colleagues asked participants at the 2018 MIT Energy Hack to find ways of using machine learning to reduce emissions in large buildings. The MIT Sustainability DataPool, a portal of campus sustainability data open to the MIT community, is another way the Institute encourages its researchers “to use the campus as a testbed to generate game-changing solutions” to climate challenges, said Julie Newman, director of sustainability and lecturer in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning.

Having this model in place was a tremendous help when the Covid-19 pandemic created a new influx of personal protective equipment (PPE) and single-use plastic items to manage within the campus’ consumption and waste sustainability plan, said Newman, also a symposium co-chair. “When all of a sudden the challenge of Covid comes and we notice that we’re going to have to grapple with supply chain and use and disposal of PPE, it didn’t take but a couple of weeks to reach out and pull together a research team, an operations team, a finance team, and say let’s study this in MIT style.”

Research universities must be a source of innovations to address global climate change, said Associate Provost Richard Lester, “because our existing government-led innovation system is falling short, even relative to the inadequate benchmarks set by governments themselves.”

Among the efforts to encourage these innovations is MIT Climate Grand Challenges, a program launched in July 2020 that encourages all MIT researchers to develop and implement climate mitigation and adaptation solutions. The program already has received more than 100 letters of interest from more 300 faculty and senior researchers, Lester said.

Technological breakthroughs are still needed urgently to stop the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, despite the talk among some experts that the technological solutions are already available, said Maria Zuber, MIT vice president for research and the E.A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics.

“I wish these individuals who think we have the technology were right. But they’re not. We do not currently have the technology we need to rapidly and adequately make the needed energy transition,” Zuber said. “This is why our work at MIT matters so much.”

Climate solutions must include more than just advanced science and technology capabilities, said Melissa Nobles, the Kenan Sahin Dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, and professor of political science. At MIT, she notes, classes on the ethics of climate change, the J-PAL King Climate Action Initiative, and Charlotte Brathwaite’s “Bee Boy” theater project are some examples of how the social sciences and arts can be brought to bear on climate issues.

“As I see it, the more that research institutions can invent practical ways for these various forms of knowledge to intersect, blend, and become mutually informing, the more quickly we can generate effective climate solutions,” Nobles said.

At the same time, universities should remember that climate change policy is only one of several issues, including global health, poverty, and racism, “which deserve and command our attention,” said Institute Professor Emeritus John Deutch. He also sounded a note of caution about how universities should engage in policy discussions. “They cannot speak out with one voice, or should do so very rarely,” he said, because members of the university community often hold diverse opinions and points of view.

The final symposium in the series, “What is the World Waiting For? Policies to Fight Climate Change” will take place online Nov. 16.

Source: https://news.mit.edu/2020/universities-climate-action-1023

Continue Reading
Bulgaria
Esports6 hours ago

blocker steps down from FATE

Energy7 hours ago

Energy Inspectors Corporation Receives U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National WaterSense Provider of the Year Award For 2020

Blockchain News7 hours ago

Chinese President Xi Jinping: Participate in Making Digital Currency and Digital Tax’s International Rule Actively

Germany
Esports8 hours ago

BIG qualify for BLAST Premier Fall Finals over Complexity

Energy8 hours ago

1 p.m. Update: Georgia Power working to restore remaining 68,000 customers after Hurricane Zeta

Blockchain News8 hours ago

South Korean Hospitals to Usher in New Healthcare Era Using Blockchain Technology, AI and Big Data

Code8 hours ago

[AWS Certified Developer] – Associate Practice Test Exam

Esports10 hours ago

Edward: “After three consecutive tournament victories in 2018, we could have become the best team in the world, but we chose to hang out”

AR/VR10 hours ago

VR Animation Baba Yaga Exclusive to Oculus Quest in 2021

Blockchain11 hours ago

Bitcoin-Themed NFT Card Set Launches On Anniversary Of Satoshi’s White Paper

Blockchain News11 hours ago

Verizon’s New Blockchain Verification Tool ‘Full Transparency’ Combats Fake News

Energy12 hours ago

9 a.m. Update: Georgia Power working to restore remaining 78,000 customers after Hurricane Zeta

Energy12 hours ago

E-Bikes Catch on Outside China, Boosting Global Market Growth Through 2024

Blockchain News12 hours ago

Chinese City Eyes Blockchain Applications for Urban Governance and Smart Education

Cyber Security12 hours ago

USCYBERCOM Released New Malware Samples

Blockchain News13 hours ago

The Bank of Russia Says CBDC Will Eliminate Challenges Caused by Cryptocurrencies

Esports14 hours ago

ESEA Season 35 Global Challenge canceled

Cyber Security17 hours ago

The WordPress Core Team has Released an Emergency Release of WordPress 5.5.3

Energy22 hours ago

Exchange between ChantsWood (Beijing) Information Technology Co., Ltd. and ZHOU Qian, Renowned Chinese Expert on Electric Power Communication

Energy1 day ago

Energy Fuels Announces Q3-2020 Results; Debt-Free with Strong Working Capital; Advancement of Uranium & Rare Earths; Webcast on November 3, 2020

Energy1 day ago

7 p.m. Update: Power restored to nearly 741,000 Georgia Power customers after Hurricane Zeta’s path through Georgia

Energy1 day ago

ACC: Plastic Waste Study In “Science Advances” Provides Incomplete Picture

Europe
Esports1 day ago

Complexity eliminate FaZe from BLAST Premier Fall Series

Blockchain1 day ago

TRAMS DEX Propels Global Adoption of DeFi with Automated Market Maker (AMM) protocol

AI1 day ago

AI Contact Tracer Awarded at UNLV

Press Releases1 day ago

Bixin Ventures Announces $100M Proprietary Capital Fund to Support Global Blockchain Ecosystem

Press Releases1 day ago

SHANGHAI, Oct 26, 2020 – (ACN Newswire)

Start Ups1 day ago

CB Insights: Trends, Insights & Startups from The Fintech 250

Press Releases1 day ago

Valarhash Launches New Service Series for its Mining Hosting Operations

zephyrnet1 day ago

Trends, Insights & Startups from The Fintech 250

AR/VR1 day ago

The VR Game Launch Roundup: Time to Grapple With Zombies & Interior Design

Cyber Security1 day ago

Hackers Continue to Target Zerologon Vulnerability

AR/VR1 day ago

Oculus Quest 2 Sales Surpass Facebook Expectations, Pre-orders 5x More Than Original Quest

Crowdfunding1 day ago

Warning: This Is Cyber Criminals’ New Method of Attack

Cannabis1 day ago

Current Research on Effect Specific Uses of Cannabis

Crowdfunding1 day ago

Friday Charts: I Double Dare You To Ignore This Trend

AR/VR1 day ago

Five Nights at Freddy’s AR: Special Delivery Update Expands Phone Compatibility, Adds New Modes

AR/VR2 days ago

Hybrid Tower Defence/FPS Cyberspace VR Launches Kickstarter

Covid192 days ago

How Telemedicine Can Help Keep Your Health on Track

Start Ups2 days ago

Website Packages – Good or Evil?

Trending