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British Company Aeralis Developing A Modular Jet Trainer Supported By The Royal Air Force

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A rendering of the different configurations of the design being developed by Aeralis in flight over the White Cliffs of Dover. (Image: Aeralis)

Aeralis project, supported through the Rapid Capabilities Office, revolves around a common fuselage with interchangeable engines and wings.

The British company Aeralis has been awarded last month a three-year contract by the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence to continue the development of its modular jet trainer aircraft with the support of the Royal Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office (RCO). According to Tristan Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of Aeralis, this aircraft will be the first to be fully developed in the UK, without international partnerships, since the BAE Hawk in 1974.

“The RCO will support the requirements and design review process to gain an understanding of how Aeralis defines the ways in which agile, modular, commercially-driven aircraft design can develop and certify a broad range of future aircraft systems that could support the RAF’s ambition to rationalise its future fleet”, said the company.

The value of the contract has not been disclosed, however The Times newspaper reported it to be £ 200,000 (278,000 USD). According to the company, the support from RAF “demonstrates the great confidence placed in British innovation and ingenuity for a project which has the potential to reinvigorate British aircraft manufacturing using the wealth of infrastructure and expertise that already exists in the UK.”

The project aims to reduce the complexity and the costs of acquisition and sustainment via an innovative digitally-driven development and the certification of flexible, open-architecture aircraft systems, applying lessons learnt from the commercial sector and using components coming only from British companies.

The design revolves around a common fuselage and interchangeable engines and wings. Aeralis expects the reconfiguration of the aircraft to happen within a normal 24 to 48-hour maintenance cycle. Currently, three variants have been proposed: a basic two-seats jet trainer capable of Mach 0.65 with a wingspan of 11.2 m, an advanced two-seats jet trainer capable of Mach 0.85 with a wingspan of 10 m, and an aggressive single-seat jet trainer capable of Mach 0.95, with a wingspan of 9 m. All configurations will have an 85% commonality of components.

An exploded view of the modules which compose the design being developed by Aeralis. (Image: Aeralis)

The company did not provide other details about the performances and the engines. From the renderings released to the press, however, it looks like the aircraft could be both in a single engine or a twin-engine configuration, according to the operator’s requirements.

In a rendering published by the Daily Mail newspaper, the aircraft was indicated as being equipped with Large Area Displays (LAD), Helmet Mounted Displays (HMD), tailorable computers, datalinks, synthetic training systems and biometric sensors, in addition to the aforementioned digital backbone and open architecture.

A similar design seems to be unprecedented, as highlighted by Deputy Chief of Defence Staff, Air Marshal Richard Knighton: “This private aircraft company is adopting an innovative approach that I have not seen before in the combat air sector. Its ingenious and innovative use of modularity, together with applying lessons learnt from the commercial sector offers the potential to break the capability cost curve that has dogged military fast jet programmes for many generations.”

In a statement released to British newspapers, a RAF spokesperson said they have no plans to replace the Hawk with this new design by Aeralis. The cooperation will be in fact purely explorative, as noted by Air Commodore Jez Holmes, the Head of the RAF’s Rapid Capabilities Office: “We are pleased to be working with Aeralis to explore the modular air-system approach to future aircraft certification, design and development and, in particular, to understand the exploitation potential of PYRAMID, our new open mission system architecture.”

The modular system, which the company says it will be designed to “streamline the design, development and in-service support processes for military aircraft across multiple training and front-line roles”, could also evolve in a fuel tanker for swarms of drones, an ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) aircraft or an unmanned attack aircraft.

This week Aeralis announced a Teaming Agreement with Thales in the UK to develop innovative philosophies, processes, devices & systems to operate the new aircraft, with a particular focus on the training systems though its well-established Training and Simulation division that designs and operates synthetic flight training simulators, such as those used at the RAF’s Voyager and Atlas training facilities at RAF Brize Norton.

Stefano D’Urso is a contributor for TheAviationist based in Lecce, Italy. He’s a full-time engineering student and aspiring pilot. In his spare time he’s also an amateur aviation photographer and flight simulation enthusiast.

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Source: https://theaviationist.com/2021/03/15/british-company-aeralis-developing-a-modular-jet-trainer-supported-by-the-royal-air-force/

Aviation

FAA To Require Checks Of All US Registered Boeing 787 Dreamliners

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Boeing’s 787 program has received another setback with news the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a new airworthiness directive. To take effect in early May, the directive applies to all Boeing 787s registered in the United States. The directive deals with the threat of decompression panels disengaging on the aircraft type.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
The FAA is extending an earlier airworthiness directive to now cover all US-registered 787 Dreamliners.
Photo: Boeing

The threat of decompression panels disengaging on Dreamliners

According to a FlightGlobal report, this airworthiness directive supplements a related directive issued in March. The FAA acted in response to reports of some decompression panels tearing in the 787’s bilge area.

Decompression panels separate the cargo area from the passenger area. They can open to act as pressure relief vents and allow a larger quantity of airflow into the cargo compartment. The concern is a leak in the bilge area could result in insufficient Halon concentrations to adequately control any fire in the aircraft’s cargo area. The airworthiness order will apply to all three models of the 787 Dreamliner operating in the United States.

In addition to several large aircraft leasing companies based there, big United States-based operators of Boeing’s 787 aircraft include American Airlines and United Airlines.

After overhauling quality control procedures, Boeing resumed delivering its 787s in March following a five-month break. In late March, a factory fresh 787-9 went to United Airlines. The pause in deliveries capped a tumultuous few years for the Dreamliner.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
United Airlines is one of the US airlines impacted by this airworthiness directive. Photo: Boeing

Last September, inspections found problems with the 787’s vertical stabilizer or tail fin. At the time, that issue threatened to impact at least 680 of the 981 Dreamliners in service worldwide. Before inspections uncovered this problem, several production issues related to improperly sized shims and aircraft skin flatness specifications had been made public.

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Around the same time the FAA began zeroing in on the decompression panel problems, Boeing also found the cockpit windows on some Dreamliners may not be up to standard. This discovery came after the outsourced manufacturer of the windows changed its production process.

Last month, the FAA issued its first airworthiness directive concerning the 787’s decompression panels. That directive mandated repetitive visual inspection of the bilge barriers located in the forward and aft cargo compartments to look for disengaged or damaged decompression panels. Any disengaged panels were to be reinstalled. Damaged panels were to be replaced.  This first directive targeted around 220 Dreamliners. The FAA estimated that each inspection cycle would cost US$56,610.

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Since then, the FAA has received fresh information that more 787 aircraft may have problems with their decompression panels. With this latest airworthiness directive, the FAA expands to inspections from a certain number of 787 Dreamliners to all 787 Dreamliners registered in the United States.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
Boeing has experienced a litany of production problems with the 787 Dreamliner. Photo: Boeing

Boeing notes no imminent safety threat posed, welcomes FAA directive

Boeing notes the flagged potential problems with the decompression panels do not pose an immediate safety hazard.

“Per our standard process, we proactively notified the FAA and our customers when we discovered this issue,” Boeing told Simple Flying when the FAA issued its earlier airworthiness directive.

“We determined then that this was not an immediate safety of flight issue, and that remains the determination. We recommended increased inspection and replacement of components as necessary, and we have worked on redesigning the part. Boeing fully supports the FAA’s Airworthiness Directive as the requirements are consistent with the guidance that we provided to 787 operators.”

What’s your opinion? Is the FAA right to expand compression panel inspections to cover all 787s registered in the United States? Post a comment and let us know.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/faa-boeing-787-dreamliner-checks/

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Aviation

FAA To Require Checks Of All US Registered Boeing 787 Dreamliners

Avatar

Published

on

Advertisement:

Boeing’s 787 program has received another setback with news the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a new airworthiness directive. To take effect in early May, the directive applies to all Boeing 787s registered in the United States. The directive deals with the threat of decompression panels disengaging on the aircraft type.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
The FAA is extending an earlier airworthiness directive to now cover all US-registered 787 Dreamliners.
Photo: Boeing

The threat of decompression panels disengaging on Dreamliners

According to a FlightGlobal report, this airworthiness directive supplements a related directive issued in March. The FAA acted in response to reports of some decompression panels tearing in the 787’s bilge area.

Decompression panels separate the cargo area from the passenger area. They can open to act as pressure relief vents and allow a larger quantity of airflow into the cargo compartment. The concern is a leak in the bilge area could result in insufficient Halon concentrations to adequately control any fire in the aircraft’s cargo area. The airworthiness order will apply to all three models of the 787 Dreamliner operating in the United States.

In addition to several large aircraft leasing companies based there, big United States-based operators of Boeing’s 787 aircraft include American Airlines and United Airlines.

After overhauling quality control procedures, Boeing resumed delivering its 787s in March following a five-month break. In late March, a factory fresh 787-9 went to United Airlines. The pause in deliveries capped a tumultuous few years for the Dreamliner.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
United Airlines is one of the US airlines impacted by this airworthiness directive. Photo: Boeing

Last September, inspections found problems with the 787’s vertical stabilizer or tail fin. At the time, that issue threatened to impact at least 680 of the 981 Dreamliners in service worldwide. Before inspections uncovered this problem, several production issues related to improperly sized shims and aircraft skin flatness specifications had been made public.

Advertisement:

Around the same time the FAA began zeroing in on the decompression panel problems, Boeing also found the cockpit windows on some Dreamliners may not be up to standard. This discovery came after the outsourced manufacturer of the windows changed its production process.

Last month, the FAA issued its first airworthiness directive concerning the 787’s decompression panels. That directive mandated repetitive visual inspection of the bilge barriers located in the forward and aft cargo compartments to look for disengaged or damaged decompression panels. Any disengaged panels were to be reinstalled. Damaged panels were to be replaced.  This first directive targeted around 220 Dreamliners. The FAA estimated that each inspection cycle would cost US$56,610.

Advertisement:

Since then, the FAA has received fresh information that more 787 aircraft may have problems with their decompression panels. With this latest airworthiness directive, the FAA expands to inspections from a certain number of 787 Dreamliners to all 787 Dreamliners registered in the United States.

FAA-Boeing-787-Dreamliner-Checks
Boeing has experienced a litany of production problems with the 787 Dreamliner. Photo: Boeing

Boeing notes no imminent safety threat posed, welcomes FAA directive

Boeing notes the flagged potential problems with the decompression panels do not pose an immediate safety hazard.

“Per our standard process, we proactively notified the FAA and our customers when we discovered this issue,” Boeing told Simple Flying when the FAA issued its earlier airworthiness directive.

“We determined then that this was not an immediate safety of flight issue, and that remains the determination. We recommended increased inspection and replacement of components as necessary, and we have worked on redesigning the part. Boeing fully supports the FAA’s Airworthiness Directive as the requirements are consistent with the guidance that we provided to 787 operators.”

What’s your opinion? Is the FAA right to expand compression panel inspections to cover all 787s registered in the United States? Post a comment and let us know.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/faa-boeing-787-dreamliner-checks/

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Former Lufthansa Cargo DC-8 To Be Auctioned In Brazil

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For approximately USD$22,500 (125,000 Brazilian reais), you could acquire a former Lufthansa Cargo DC-8, currently parked at Guarulhos International Airport (GRU) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The auction for this aircraft will take place on April 23, being held by Superbid Marketplace and GRUAirport, the company that administrates the most important hub in South America. What else do we know?

A BETA Cargo DC-8 is up for grabs in Brazil’s Guarulhos International Airport. Photo: Aeroprints.com via Wikimedia Commons.

A brief history about this DC-8

The aircraft is a DC-8-73F that was built in 1969. Throughout its history, it had nine different operators, according to Planespotters.net.

Since its inception, this aircraft undertook cargo operations. For example, its first owner was Flying Tiger Line, the first scheduled cargo airline in the United States. Flying Tiger operated between 1945 and 1989 when it merged into FedEx Express.

Over the next 15 years, this aircraft held an American registration, N973FT, and flew with US carriers such as Flying Tiger, Overseas National Airways, and Trans International Airlines.

In 1984, it went to Europe.

It first flew with German Cargo Services, a company from West Germany that operated freighter flights on behalf of Lufthansa. In 1993, when German Cargo disappeared under the Lufthansa Cargo brand, this DC-8 stayed in the company.

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But it was not very long before the DC-8 went back to the US to operate under the Emery Worldwide Airlines brand in 1997. In 2003, it served for DHL and ASTAR Air Cargo before going to Brazil.

BETA Cargo received the DC-8 and gave it its last registration, PP-BEL. This Brazilian cargo airline ceased operations in 2012, becoming the last company in Brazil to use DC-8 and Boeing 707 aircraft.

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The auction

Since BETA Cargo’s folding, the aircraft has been grounded, gathering dust and rust at Guarulhos International Airport.

In a Youtube video published by an avgeek Brazilian channel, we can see the state of decay this aircraft is currently in.

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Now, GRUAirport, in an attempt to reduce unused assets within the hub, is auctioning several items, including the DC-8. The bid for the aircraft is starting at 125,000 Brazilian reais. The auction ends on April 23 at 16:40, local time.

It is uncertain what the future will be for this DC-8. Maybe it can follow the steps of a former Varig’s Boeing 727-100F that was auctioned for about US$16,500 last year. This aircraft, which was abandoned in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, will become a museum honoring Varig’s former glory.

McDonnell Douglas built the DC-8 between 1959 and 1972. Photo: Pedro Aragão via Wikimedia Commons.

Other uses for old abandoned aircraft

There are many old aircraft rusting all over the world. These planes are no longer airworthy but still are reminders of aviation’s history and could have good use.

For instance, there’s an A320 restaurant in Nanjing, China; a DC9-14 and B737-200 libraries in Mexico City; and several theme hotels across the world that use aircraft such as the B747.

Airplanes can also be dismantled to create keyrings, bags, or whatever piece of merch the avgeek community loves.

When an aircraft stops flying, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it will stop existing. There are so many possibilities with them.

What would you do if you owned an old aircraft? Let us know in the comments.

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/lufthansa-cargo-dc-8-auction-brazil/

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American Airlines reintroduces beverage service as customers return

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American Airlines has made this announcement:

Starting May 1, American Airlines will reintroduce full beverage service in all domestic premium cabins. Starting June 1, beverage service, including canned drinks, juice and water, will begin in the main cabin.

The safety and well-being of customers and flight crew on board is a top priority for American. This has been the guiding strategy for bringing back more inflight services in a careful and thoughtful way to ensure flight attendants and customers feel safe and comfortable. American worked hand-in-hand with the Association of Professional Flight Attendants (APFA) and experts from Vanderbilt University Medical Center as part of American’s Travel Health Advisory Panel to determine to the safest way to carefully return the food and beverage program.

“American’s reintroduction of beverage service is a careful and informed process to ensure everyone on board feels safe and comfortable,” said Brady Byrnes, Vice President of Flight Service. “When customers fly with American, they are trusting us with their safety. We worked closely with the union that represents our flight attendants, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants, and medical experts on this process. Through our partnership, we collectively determined that the timing is right to bring back this service, and we can do so while continuing to give customers peace of mind.”

Feedback from flight attendants and customers will be closely considered as more food and beverage service is introduced incrementally.

Customers will also be reminded of face covering guidelines throughout their time traveling with American. In accordance with federal guidelines, American requires face coverings to be worn at all times at the airport and onboard the aircraft and can only be briefly removed while the customer is eating or drinking.

To make flying easier for customers as they return to the skies, American will continue to update the travel experience page on aa.com for customers to reference as they plan future travel, especially as American incrementally builds back its food and beverage program.

Domestic beverage service details:

Domestic Premium Cabin

  • Beginning May 1: Full complimentary beverage service, including alcohol, canned drinks, juice and water.

Domestic Main Cabin

  • Beverage service is currently provided on flights longer than 2,200 miles (approximately four hours or more).
  • Beginning June 1: Complimentary beverage service, including canned drinks, juice and water.
  • Later this summer: Full main cabin beverage service, including alcoholic beverage options, along with American’s popular buy-on-board food program.

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Source: https://worldairlinenews.com/2021/04/19/american-airlines-reintroduces-beverage-service-as-customers-return/

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