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Arrowhead Presents New Clinical Data on Cardiometabolic Pipeline at AHA 2020

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Home > Press > Arrowhead Presents New Clinical Data on Cardiometabolic Pipeline at AHA 2020

Abstract:
– ARO-APOC3 achieved triglyceride reductions of 74-92%

– ARO-ANG3 achieved triglyceride reductions of 29-75% and LCL-C reductions of 29-35%

– Company to host upcoming KOL webinars on ARO-APOC3 and ARO-ANG3

Arrowhead Presents New Clinical Data on Cardiometabolic Pipeline at AHA 2020


Pasadena. CA | Posted on November 13th, 2020

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARWR) today announced positive clinical data from multiple product candidates in its cardiometabolic pipeline at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2020.

Javier San Martin, M.D., chief medical officer at Arrowhead, said: “The data presented at AHA on our cardiometabolic pipeline continue to show strong and consistent response across a range of lipid parameters. There remains significant residual cardiovascular risk despite recent scientific advances, and we believe that our cardiometabolic pipeline has the ability to target new therapeutic targets and address multiple lipid parameters associated with increased cardiovascular risk.”

Copies of the following presentations may be accessed on the Events and Presentations page under the Investors section of the Arrowhead website:

Title: Pharmacodynamic effect of ARO-ANG3, an investigational RNA interference therapeutic targeting hepatic angiopoietin-like protein 3, in patients with hypercholesterolemia
Authors: Gerald F. Watts, et al.
Session: Advances in Understanding and Treatment of Dyslipidemia and New Therapies for CVD

Title: Pharmacodynamic effect of ARO-APOC3, an investigational hepatocyte-targeted RNA interference therapeutic targeting apolipoprotein C3, in patients with hypertriglyceridemia and multifactorial chylomicronemia
Authors: Christie Ballantyne, presenting on behalf of Peter Clifton, et al.
Session: Advances in Understanding and Treatment of Dyslipidemia and New Therapies for CVD

Title: Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Single-Dose AMG 890, a Novel siRNA Targeting Lp(a), in Healthy Subjects and Subjects with Elevated Lp(a)
Authors: Michael J. Koren, et al.
Session: Advances in Understanding and Treatment of Dyslipidemia and New Therapies for CVD

Arrowhead will also host two key opinion leader (KOL) webinars on November 18, and November 19, 2020 to discuss data from, and the company’s future plans for, its two investigational cardiometabolic candidates, ARO-APOC3 and ARO-ANG3. The webinars may be accessed on the Events and Presentations page under the Investors section of the Arrowhead website.

####

About Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals develops medicines that treat intractable diseases by silencing the genes that cause them. Using a broad portfolio of RNA chemistries and efficient modes of delivery, Arrowhead therapies trigger the RNA interference mechanism to induce rapid, deep, and durable knockdown of target genes. RNA interference, or RNAi, is a mechanism present in living cells that inhibits the expression of a specific gene, thereby affecting the production of a specific protein. Arrowhead’s RNAi-based therapeutics leverage this natural pathway of gene silencing.

For more information, please visit www.arrowheadpharma.com, or follow us on Twitter @ArrowheadPharma. To be added to the Company’s email list and receive news directly, please visit http://ir.arrowheadpharma.com/email-alerts .

Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act:

This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon our current expectations and speak only as of the date hereof. Our actual results may differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements as a result of various factors and uncertainties, including the safety and efficacy of our product candidates, the duration and impact of regulatory delays in our clinical programs, our ability to finance our operations, the likelihood and timing of the receipt of future milestone and licensing fees, the future success of our scientific studies, our ability to successfully develop and commercialize drug candidates, the timing for starting and completing clinical trials, rapid technological change in our markets, and the enforcement of our intellectual property rights. Our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q discuss some of the important risk factors that may affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. We assume no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect new events or circumstances.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Vince Anzalone, CFA
626-304-3400

Investors:
LifeSci Advisors, LLC
Brian Ritchie
212-915-2578
www.lifesciadvisors.com

Media:
LifeSci Communications, LLC
Josephine Belluardo, Ph.D.
646-751-4361
www.lifescicommunications.com

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Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation

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Home > Press > Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation

One dimensional quantum lattice liquids. CREDIT
I. Morera et al. Phys. Rev. Lett
One dimensional quantum lattice liquids. CREDIT
I. Morera et al. Phys. Rev. Lett

Abstract:
Liquids are ubiquitous in Nature: from the water that we consume daily to superfluid helium which is a quantum liquid appearing at temperatures as low as only a few degrees above the absolute zero. A common feature of these vastly different liquids is being self-bound in free space in the form of droplets. Understanding from a microscopic perspective how a liquid is formed by adding particles one by one is a significant challenge.

Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation


Barcelona, Spain | Posted on January 15th, 2021

Recently, a new type of quantum droplets has been experimentally observed in ultracold atomic systems. These ones are made of alkaline atoms which are cooled down to extremely low temperatures of the order of nanokelvins. The main peculiarity of these systems is that they are the most dilute liquids ever experimentally observed. An extraordinary experimental control over the system opens the possibility of unraveling the mechanism leading to the formation of quantum droplets.

In a recent article published in Physical Review Letters, researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB) Ivan Morera and the late Prof. Artur Polls led by Prof. Bruno Juliá-Díaz, in collaboration with Prof. Grigori Astrakharchik from UPC, present a microscopic theory of lattice quantum droplets which explains their formation.

The team of researchers has shown that the formation of the quantum droplet can be explained in terms of effective interactions between dimers (bound states of two particles). Moreover, by solving the four-body problem they have shown that tetramers (bound states of four particles) can appear and they can be interpreted as simple bound states of two dimers.

The properties of these tetramers already coincide with the ones of large quantum droplets which indicates that many of the feature properties of the many-body liquid are contained in the tetramer. They also discussed the possibility of observing these strongly correlated droplets in dipolar bosons or bosonic mixtures in optical lattices.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Bibiana Bonmati
0093-403-5544

Copyright © University of Barcelona

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Scientists’ discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers

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Home > Press > Scientists’ discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers

Researchers showed that microcrystals, synthesised on the basis of mixed optical fluoride crystal matrices doped with erbium, praseodymium and some other ions of rare earth elements, can work as qubits that enable ultrafast optical quantum computing. CREDIT
wikipedia.org
Researchers showed that microcrystals, synthesised on the basis of mixed optical fluoride crystal matrices doped with erbium, praseodymium and some other ions of rare earth elements, can work as qubits that enable ultrafast optical quantum computing. CREDIT
wikipedia.org

Abstract:
Scientists at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu have found a way to develop optical quantum computers of a new type. Central to the discovery are rare earth ions that have certain characteristics and can act as quantum bits. These would give quantum computers ultrafast computation speed and better reliability compared to earlier solutions. The University of Tartu researchers Vladimir Hizhnyakov, Vadim Boltrushko, Helle Kaasik and Yurii Orlovskii published the results of their research in the scientific journal Optics Communications.

Scientists’ discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers


Tartu, Estonia | Posted on January 15th, 2021

While in ordinary computers, the units of information are binary digits or bits, in quantum computers the units are quantum bits or qubits. In an ordinary computer, information is mostly carried by electricity in memory storage cells consisting of field-effect transistors, but in a quantum computer, depending on the type of computer, the information carriers are much smaller particles, for example ions, photons and electrons. The qubit information may be carried by a certain characteristic of this particle (for example, spin of electron or polarisation of photon), which may have two states. While the values of an ordinary bit are 0 or 1, also intermediate variants of these values are possible in the quantum bit. The intermediate state is called the superposition. This property gives quantum computers the ability to solve tasks, which ordinary computers are unable to perform within reasonable time.

Qubits of mixed-ion crystals

Researchers of the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu showed that microcrystals, synthesised on the basis of mixed optical fluoride crystal matrices doped with erbium, praseodymium and some other ions of rare earth elements, can work as qubits that enable ultrafast optical quantum computing.

Professor Vladimir Hizhnyakov, member of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, says that when selecting the ions, their electronic states of very different properties are of utmost importance. “They must have at least two states in which the ion interaction is very weak. These states are suitable for basic quantum-logic operations on single quantum bits. In addition, a state or states are needed in which the ion interaction is strong – these states enable quantum-logic operations with two or more qubits. All these states must have a long (milli- or microsecond) lifetime and optical transitions must be allowed between these states,” Hizhnyakov explained.

He says that so far, finding such electronic states of rare earth ions was not considered possible, and that is why scientists have not looked for such states suitable for qubits among them. “So far, mostly the spin states of atomic nuclei have been studied for the role of qubits. However, their frequency is a million times lower than the frequency of our quantum bits. This is why also quantum computers created on the basis of these qubits would be significantly slower than computers with our electronic states-based quantum bits,” he explained.

Higher speed and fewer errors

An ultrafast working cycle would allow, according to Hizhnyakov, to overcome one the major obstacles in the creation of quantum computers. Qubits are namely very sensitive to their environment, which is why any environmental interference may lead to errors in quantum computation. “The coherence time of qubits, i.e. the duration of the pure quantum state, is very short. The faster the computation cycle, the less interference is caused by the surrounding environment in the work of qubits,” Hizhnyakov explained.

It has been ascertained that the spectral hole-burning method, previously developed at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu can be used for selecting a set of qubits in a microcrystal acting as a computer instance. According to Hizhnyakov, this at present one of most powerful methods of optical spectroscopy, which allows to find those ions in a microcrystal that are the most suitable for use as computer qubits.

Although it is still a long way full of obstacles to an actually working quantum computer, researchers of the laser spectroscopy laboratory of the University of Tartu have started building a pilot prototype of quantum computer based on the new method. According to the researchers, they are on the threshold of presenting the work of the basic elements of the new type of quantum computer.

The completed research study is a part of the joint project “Spectroscopy of entangled states of clusters of rare-earth impurity ions for quantum computing”, conducted by the Laboratory of Laser Spectroscopy and the Laboratory of Solid State Theory at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu.

####

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372-737-4759

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Source: http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=56525

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Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times

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Jan 15, 2021 (Nanowerk News) In groundbreaking materials research, a team led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows—transparency and conductivity. The researchers are the first to observe metallic lines in a perovskite crystal. Perovskites abound in the Earth’s center, and barium stannate (BaSnO3) is one such crystal. However, it has not been studied extensively for metallic properties because of the prevalence of more conductive materials on the planet like metals or semiconductors. The finding was made using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a technique that can form images with magnifications of up to 10 million. The research is published in Science Advances (“Metallic line defect in wide-bandgap transparent perovskite BaSnO3). This image shows the atomic arrangement of both the BaSnO3 crystal (on the left) and the metallic line defect Using advanced analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at a magnification of 10 million times, University of Minnesota researchers were able to isolate and image the structure and composition of the metallic line defect in a perovskite crystal BaSnO3. This image shows the atomic arrangement of both the BaSnO3 crystal (on the left) and the metallic line defect. (Image: Mkhoyan Group, University of Minnesota) “The conductive nature and preferential direction of these metallic line defects mean we can make a material that is transparent like glass and at the same time very nicely directionally conductive like a metal,” said Mkhoyan, a TEM expert and the Ray D. and Mary T. Johnson/Mayon Plastics Chair in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota’s College of Science and Engineering. “This gives us the best of two worlds. We can make windows or new types of touch screens transparent and at the same time conductive. This is very exciting.” Defects, or imperfections, are common in crystals—and line defects (the most common among them is the dislocation) are a row of atoms that deviate from the normal order. Because dislocations have the same composition of elements as the host crystal, the changes in electronic band structure at the dislocation core, due to symmetry-reduction and strain, are often only slightly different than that of the host. The researchers needed to look outside the dislocations to find the metallic line defect, where defect composition and resulting atomic structure are vastly different. “We easily spotted these line defects in the high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images of these BaSnO3 thin films because of their unique atomic configuration and we only saw them in the plan view,” said Hwanhui Yun, a graduate student in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and a lead author of the study. For this study, BaSnO3 films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)—a technique to fabricate high-quality crystals—in a lab at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. Metallic line defects observed in these BaSnO3 films propagate along film growth direction, which means researchers can potentially control how or where line defects appear—and potentially engineer them as needed in touchscreens, smart windows, and other future technologies that demand a combination of transparency and conductivity. “We had to be creative to grow high-quality BaSnO3 thin films using MBE. It was exciting when these new line defects came into light in the microscope,” said Bharat Jalan, associate professor and Shell Chair in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, who heads up the lab that grows a variety of perovskite oxide films by MBE. Perovskite crystals (ABX3) contain three elements in the unit cell. This gives it freedom for structural alterations such as composition and crystal symmetry, and the ability to host a variety of defects. Because of different coordination and bonding angles of the atoms in the line defect core, new electronic states are introduced and the electronic band structure is modified locally in such a dramatic way that it turns the line defect into metal. “It was fascinating how theory and experiment agreed with each other here,” said Turan Birol, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and an expert in density functional theory (DFT). “We could verify the experimental observations of the atomic structure and electronic properties of this line defect with first principles DFT calculations.”

Source: https://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news2/newsid=57034.php

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Diamonds are a cell’s best friend

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Jan 15, 2021 (Nanowerk News) Scientists have used tiny diamonds, or nanodiamonds, to measure heat transfer inside living cells, potentially leading to new diagnostic tools and therapies for cancer (Science Advances, “In situ measurements of intracellular thermal conductivity using heater-thermometer hybrid diamond nanosensors”). Associate Professor Taras Plakhotnik, from The University of Queensland’s School of Mathematics and Physics, in collaboration with Osaka University and National University of Singapore, facilitated the measurements with an unconventional approach. “We have coated the nanodiamonds with a heat-releasing polymer,” Dr Plakhotnik said. “When irradiated with light from a laser, such particles can act both as heaters and thermometers, allowing the thermal conductivity of the interior of the cell to be calculated. “This is a significant breakthrough since, even though the cell is the fundamental unit of all living organisms, some of its physical properties have remained difficult to study. “A cell’s thermal conductivity – the rate that heat can flow through an object if one side is hot and another is cold – has remained mysterious. “But now we’re able to determine the thermal conductivity inside living cells with a spatial resolution of about 200 nanometres, which is incredibly accurate. “This level of resolution allowed for measurements in different locations inside cells. “Closing this gap in our knowledge is important for applications such as developing thermal therapies targeting cancer cells and bacteria, and for answering fundamental questions about cell operation.” Dr Plakhotnik said the team’s invention had already revealed some fascinating results: “We found that the rate of heat diffusion in cells, as measured in our experiments, was several times slower than in pure water, for example.” Osaka University’s Associate Professor Madoka Suzuki said the applications of the new technology were exhilarating, and could provide hope for a number of medical conditions. “This research shows that our particles are not toxic and can be used in living cells,” Dr Suzuki said. “In addition to improving heat-based treatments for cancer, we think potential applications for this work will result in a better understanding of metabolic disorders, such as obesity. “This tool may also be used for basic cell research, for example, to monitor biochemical reactions in real time. “A variety of effective treatments are potentially ahead, so we’re looking forward to seeing this technology in action.”

Source: https://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news2/newsid=57033.php

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