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AppOps with Kubernetes and Devtron: The Perfect Fit

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Kubernetes needs no introduction in this cloud-native world. It was born when I was a middle-aged man. Years later, I am still as young as earlier (take with a pinch of salt) while Kubernetes grew out to be a fine tool that outperformed other platforms in enabling operational efficiency and application resilience. 

In the past, I wrote several articles and guides on Kubernetes and supported platforms. But then, in the pursuit of appyness, there is no end to innovation. 

In this article today, I take up another interesting use-case of Devtron as an open-source platform that refactors the Kubernetes ecosystem into an easy-to-use AppOps model. 

First, a few basics. 

What Are We Trying to Achieve?

Exploring the Devtron platform to validate its capabilities to build, deploy and manage apps on a K8s cluster. 

What is Devtron?

Devtron is an open-source, GUI based platform to deploy and manage Kubernetes applications. The platform allows you to manage an entire application ecosystem through a single control pane that spans across multiple cloud service providers with varying environments. While doing so, efficient collaboration and security sits at its core to naturally enable a DevOps model.

Let’s get a hands-on. 

Stage 1: Creating an Amazon EKS Cluster

We will start with configuring an AWS EKS cluster (you may also use a GKE or AKS cluster as per your choice). In case you already have a cluster setup, you may skip over to Stage 2. 

Part One: Installing the AWS CLI

To work with AWS on the command line, you need to install the AWS CLI, that enables the creation and management of AWS services from a Linux, macOS, or Windows console. If you’re logged into the AWS console, you can spin up the AWS CloudShell, which comes preinstalled with the AWS CLI.

To install AWS CLI on Linux, log into your Linux operating system and access the console.

  1. Fetch the latest AWS CLI version for Linux-x86(64-bit) platform.
$ curl "https://awscli.amazonaws.com/awscli-exe-linux-x86_64.zip" -o "awscliv2.zip"

Quick Tip: The URL above is different for the ARM platform-based Linux. More details can be found here

2. Unzip the fetched zip file.

$ unzip awscliv2.zip

3. Run the install script with admin privileges.

$ sudo ./aws/install

4. Finally, validate the version of the AWS CLI installed.

$ aws --version

Output of the command above shows the current version of the AWS CLI installed. Once confirmed, we are ready to proceed with the next steps. 

Part Two: Installing the eksctl command-line tool.

To create the Amazon EKS Cluster from the command line, install the

eksctl

command-line tool on the Linux operating system. Note that this is also possible on macOS and Windows. The following commands will cover how to install the tool on 64-bit Linux.

  1. Fetch the latest version of
    eksctl

    .

$ curl --silent --location "https://github.com/weaveworks/eksctl/releases/latest/download/eksctl_$(uname -s)_amd64.tar.gz" | tar xz -C /tmp

2. Move the extracted files to

/usr/local/bin

.

$ sudo mv /tmp/eksctl /usr/local/bin

3. Then confirm your

eksctl version.

In my case, it was

0.40.0

and might be different for you.

$ eksctl version
0.40.0

Part Three: Deploy an EKS Cluster with Active Nodes.

  1. The next step is to deploy an Amazon EKS cluster. To do so, use the
    create cluster

    command, that sets up all the required resources.

$ eksctl create cluster 
--name devtron-darwin-cluster 
--region us-east-2 
--nodegroup-name devtron-darwin-nodegroup 
--node-type t2.micro 
--nodes 4 
--nodes-min 1 
--nodes-max 5 
--managed

The command above creates an EKS Cluster with  – 

  • a given name
  • region,
  • nodegroup-name,
  • node-type, nodes,
  • minimum nodes and maximum nodes of the node group,
  • and then deploys the cluster on a managed node group type.

You may also change the values of the above to those as desired for your environment.

2. When the command execution completes, you should have your EKS cluster ready with a similar message as shown below. Don’t worry about the message “kubectl not found”, that is what we will install in the next part. 

You can then confirm your created EKS cluster and node configuration on the AWS portal as shown below.

Part Four: Installing kubectl

To work with our new EKS cluster, we need to install

kubectl,

an open-source command-line tool used to interact with Kubernetes clusters.

  1. Fetch the
    kubectl

    tool for Kubernetes version 1.18. Note that there are different links available for lower or higher versions, however, to use Devtron, version 1.18 or above is recommended.

$ curl -o kubectl https://amazon-eks.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/1.18.9/2020-11-02/bin/linux/a
md64/kubectl

2. Change the permissions to allow execution on the

kubectl

binary fetched.

$ chmod +x ./kubectl

3. Copy the binary in the current path to your home directory.

$ mkdir -p $HOME/bin && cp ./kubectl $HOME/bin/kubectl && export PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin

4. Check the version of

kubectl

installed to confirm the installation has been successful and as intended.

$ kubectl version --short --client Client Version: v1.18.9-eks-d1db3c

5. Next, you should be able to run the command below to see your active Kubernetes cluster.

$ kubectl get service NAME TYPE CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
kubernetes ClusterIP 10.100.0.1 <none> 443/TCP 33d

Stage 2: Installing Devtron

Installing Devtron is supported through three ways, installation using

kubectl

, Helm 2, or Helm 3. 

For the purpose of this article, we shall cover installing Devtron using Helm 3 with default configurations that use Minio to store build cache and logs.

  1. Start by changing the Kubernetes context to the EKS cluster that you want to use, change the region and cluster name values to those specific to your environment.
$ aws eks --region us-east-2 update-kubeconfig --name 
darwin-devtron-cluster02

2. Create a

namespace

to use for Devtron using

devtroncd

as the name.

$ kubectl create namespace devtroncd

3. Fetch Helm 3 from the official helm repo using the curl command.

$ curl -fsSL -o get_helm.sh https://raw.githubusercontent.com/helm/helm/master/scripts/get-helm-3

4. Change the permissions on the helm script to allow execution.

$ chmod 700 get_helm.sh

5. Execute the helm script.

$ ./get_helm.sh

Quick Tip: For Helm to install, you need the OpenSSL library on your Linux operating system. For this article, we are using a RedHat-based Linux operating system so we will use the

yum

package manager to install OpenSSL.

$ sudo yum -y install openssl

6. To confirm the Helm installation, type the command below to receive the output as shown.

$ helm version WARNING: Kubernetes configuration file is group-readable. This is insecure. Location: /home/cloudshell-user/.kube/config
WARNING: Kubernetes configuration file is world-readable. This is insecure. Location: /home/cloudshell-user/.kube/config
version.BuildInfo{Version:"v3.5.3", GitCommit:"041ce5a2c17a58be0fcd5f5e16fb3e7e95fea622", GitTreeState:"dirty",
GoVersion:"go1.15.8"}

7. After installing Helm, add the Devtron Helm chart repo that uses the Helm installation method. (Source: https://docs.devtron.ai/)

$ helm repo add devtron https://helm.devtron.ai

8. Next, use the command below to navigate to the Devtron installation directory, set the namespace for Devtron, the password for PostgreSQL, and start installing Devtron. (Source: https://docs.devtron.ai/)

$ helm install devtron devtron/devtron-operator --namespace devtroncd --set secrets.POSTGRESQL_PASSWORD=new-password-here

9. To monitor the Devtron installation’s progress, access the pods within the

devtroncd

namespace and take note of the pod that begins with inception-849d647c4d.

$ kubectl get pod -n devtroncd

10. Type the command below to monitor the logs that show the installation progress.

$ kubectl logs -f inception-849d647c4d-ldncs -n devtroncd

The installation takes about 15 to 30 minutes to complete. When that is done, use the following command to verify that the installation has been completed successfully. The command should echo a result Applied onto the console. 

$ kubectl -n devtroncd get installers installer-devtron -o jsonpath='{.status.sync.status}' Applied[cloudshell-user@ip-10-0-XX-XX ~]$

11. You can also verify the running pods in the

devtroncd

namespace by typing the command shown below.

$ kubectl get pods -n devtroncd

The command output above shows us the running pods within the

devtroncd

namespace.

12. Before we can access the dashboard, obtain the admin password that was created during the Devtron installation process. Use the command below to get the password. 

$ kubectl -n devtroncd get secret devtron-secret -o jsonpath='{.data.ACD_PASSWORD}' | base64 -d argocd-server-59XXXXX-XXXX[cloudshell-user@ip-10-0-XX-XX ~]$

13. After that, type a command that gets all the services within the

devtroncd

namespace and choose the load balancer service, which has a public address that you can paste into your browser.

$ kubectl get svc -n devtroncd devtron-grafana ClusterIP 10.100.159.169 devtron-kubernetes-external-secrets ClusterIP 10.100.171.60 devtron-minio ClusterIP 10.100.230.236 devtron-minio-svc ClusterIP None devtron-nats ClusterIP 10.100.195.145 devtron-nats-mgmt ClusterIP None devtron-service LoadBalancer 10.100.204.202 a4777dd57858a4dc59afb0a4517b1748-XXXXXXXXXX.us-east-2.elb.amazonaws.com

PS: Dashboard URL above is edited for security purposes.

14. Paste the URL of the load balancer in a browser, which then loads up the Devtron dashboard. The next step is to insert the username “admin” and the password that was provided.

Quick Tip: To access the password that was automatically generated for the default admin user account, type the below command into your console. 

$ kubectl -n devtroncd get secret devtron-secret -o jsonpath='{.data.ACD_PASSWORD}' | base64 -d

That’s it, you have successfully installed Devtron on your Amazon EKS cluster and accessed the dashboard. You are now ready to start creating applications using Devtron.

Quick Tip: Once you are through with the Devtron dashboard setup, you can also enable Single Sign-On for the Devtron dashboard using third-party Identity providers. To do so, you need to access the Devtron Global Configurations page and then apply settings under the SSO Login Services tab.

Stage 3: Deploying an Application using Devtron

The following steps will cover how to deploy an application using Devtron. To get started, we need to set up a few prerequisites for successful deployment.

Part One: Setting the Host URL

  1. In the Devtron dashboard, click on the Global Configurations button at the bottom left and select the option Host URL.

2. Update the URL with that of the Devtron Service Load Balancer.

Quick Tip: You can use a custom domain within AWS Route 53 that points to the Devtron service load balancer to avoid using the long URL.

Part Two: Adding a GitOps account

For successful Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) using Devtron, the tool needs to access a GitOps account that holds different parameters and configurations (Helm charts) for your Devtron applications. A repository will be automatically created once CI is initiated, as we shall see in the following steps.

  1. To add a GitOps account, click on the GitOps tab on the left of your global configurations screen and add the Github organization and access credentials. 
  2. Add the Git Host, the Github organization name, Git access credentials, and then click Save.

Part Three: Adding a Git Account

After adding a GitOps account, the next step is adding a Git account.

  1. Click on add git account, Name to your Git provider, set the URL, Authentication type, the Git Username, Password, and then click Save.

Part Three: Adding a Docker Registry

The next step is adding a docker registry that we shall use to build, push, and pull our images to the designated Docker Repo using the Devtron CI/CD pipeline.

  1. Click Add docker registry, set the Registry name, the Registry type (in our case its ECR), add the Registry URL, the AWS region, the Amazon IAM role access Id, Secret access key, and then click Save.

Part Four: Adding a New App

  1. On the Devtron dashboard, click on the Applications tab; this will bring up a display with a button Add New App at the top right of the screen, click on the button.

2. The next step is to give the Application a Name, select the Project for the Application, and set the Applications Template. In this demo, we are using a Blank App template.

Quick Tip: You can create multiple projects and groups for your applications across different projects. This enables ease of management of deployments. To create new projects, access the projects tab under the global configuration menu.

3. After clicking Create App, a new screen will add the Git Provider, Git Repo URL, and Checkout Path. In this demo, we are using the Github public provider, add the Git repo URL for our application, set the checkout path to its defaults, and click Save.

4. Next, the Git Materials configuration will appear, where you are ready to move on to the next step. Click Next at the bottom right of the screen, which takes you to the Docker Build Configuration page.

5. Set the Dockerfile’s Relative Path for the application, select the Container Registry, set the Docker Repository, click Save Configuration, and then click Next.

6. The next page allows us to set the Deployment Template parameters. For this demo, we shall leave all the settings with their defaults and click Save.

7. Once you click Save, you should see the Devtron Application’s Helm chart repo automatically created in the Github organization specified. Then, click Next to proceed to the workflow editor page.

Stage 4: Triggering Continuous Integration & Delivery (CI/CD)

In this section, we will build and deploy our containerized application to a Kubernetes cluster using Devtron.

Part One: Triggering Continuous Integration

  1. To enable Continuous Integration, we need to add a new workflow to our application. Click add a New Workflow, give the workflow a Name and click Save.

2. Once that is done, click Add CI Pipeline to start setting up Continuous Integration. 

Then, select the Continuous Integration option to build a docker image from the Git repo that contains the Dockerfile.

3. Next, assign the CI pipeline a name, set the Git branch name to build the image, click create pipeline and leave the other settings with their defaults for demo purposes.

Quick Tip: You may select the Manual pipeline execution method in a situation where you want to maintain complete control over the builds and deployments of your workload.

4. After creating the pipeline, click the + button and then select the Deploy to Environment option.

5. Next, assign the Name to the deployment pipeline, click Create pipeline, and leave other settings with their defaults unless required specifically.

Quick Tip: You can select Rolling, Canary, or Blue-green deployment strategies for your applications within the deployment pipeline and can change any time with just a single click.

After setting the configurations, the new Workflow should appear as shown below.

6. Next,  click on the Trigger tab, and select the build material step button to initiate the Continuous Integration pipeline.

7. Once you Select Material, a popup shows a list of previous commits to build the application from.

8. Select the commit and click Start Build. You can also monitor progress by selecting the Build History tab and select the Logs section.

The screenshot displays the build logs, the build and push process of the container image, and the container registry.

Part Two: Triggering Continuous Deployment

The final step is to deploy the application to the EKS cluster using the deployment pipeline step.

  1. Select the Trigger tab to view your available workflows. Click Select Image on the deploy step to trigger the deployment using the deployment strategy that we defined, and the pipeline will display as Progressing.

2. To confirm that the deployment is done, click on the Deployment Metrics tab, and select your environment.

And we are done! The Devtron platform is now all setup with your workload. Below I have also captured a few troubleshooting steps in case you face any of the issues. 

Stage 5: Troubleshooting Typical Setup and Deployment Issues

Issue 1: Re-installation of Devtron freezes or returns errors.

  1. If an earlier Installation of Devtron failed on the cluster, you might receive errors in case you try to re-install Devtron. Make sure to look at the errors that are being thrown from the
    inception

    pod. You can quickly check the logs using the command below.

 $ kubectl logs -f inception-d95bc9478-7blw6 -n devtroncd

2. Change the name of the

inception

pod to that of your environment. The command below also produces similar output on any cluster.

$ pod=$(kubectl -n devtroncd get po -l app=inception -o jsonpath='{.items[0].metadata.name}')&& kubectl -n devtroncd logs -f $pod

3. Then run the following commands to clean up the previous installations.

$ cd devtron-installation-script/
$ kubectl delete -n devtroncd -f yamls/
$ kubectl delete -n devtroncd -f charts/devtron/templates/devtron-installer.yaml
$ kubectl delete -n devtroncd -f charts/devtron/templates/install.yaml
$ kubectl delete -n devtroncd -f charts/devtron/crds
$ kubectl delete ns devtroncd

4. Additionally, you can also run the command below to make sure that all components of the past installation are removed.

$ cd devtron-installation-script/
$ kubectl delete -n devtroncd -f yamls/
$ kubectl -n devtroncd patch installer installer-devtron --type json -p '[{"op": "remove", "path": "/status"}]'

Issue 2: Initial Devtron Application build error using CI pipeline.

You may get a build error as shown in the screenshot below just after logging in to the Devtron dashboard while creating your first application, and then triggering Continuous Integration. This may also occur when the previous installation was set to Store Build and cache logs initially set to AWS S3 storage and then later changed to the default storage configuration.

  1. To resolve the issue, run the commands below to upgrade your Devtron installation.
$ helm repo update
$ helm upgrade devtron devtron/devtron-operator -n devtroncd

2. Then, monitor the status of the upgrade and confirm completion by running the command below.

$ kubectl -n devtroncd get installers installer-devtron -o jsonpath='{.status.sync.status}'

Issue 3: Devtron fails to connect to Github for GitOps

Often, this might not be a Devtron issue, but the Github API’s connection might be broken. The solution to this is to make sure that you can call Github to get your organization’s repository.

The screenshot below shows a failed call.

The screenshot below shows a successful API call to the organization’s (Brollyca) repo.

Additionally, you can monitor the logs for all your Git operations by checking the activity within the

git-sensor

pod that runs all the Git operations.

$ kubectl logs -f git-sensor-0 -n devtroncd

Verdict?

Straightforward and simple! 

The concept of an AppOps model has been in theory since a long time. Several other platforms including GitLab, Azure DevOps, Harness, etc. tried this in the past but had their own set of limitations to be considered for a wider adoption. It is interesting to note that Devtron has held the bull by its horn by making itself platform agnostic, where collaboration is the key.

In a set of forthcoming articles, I wish to dig deeper on Devtron’s claimed features which aren’t covered in this article, such as – scanning Docker images for vulnerabilities, writing config maps, storing application secrets, and defining an application deployment strategy. 

I am sure the platform has much in store to explore, make use of and review. 

Till then, happy coding with masks on. 😷

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Optimal Dynamics nabs $22M for AI-powered freight logistics

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Optimal Dynamics, a New York-based startup applying AI to shipping logistics, today announced that it closed a $18.4 million round led by Bessemer Venture Partners. Optimal Dynamics says that the funds will be used to more than triple its 25-person team and support engineering efforts, as well as bolster sales and marketing departments.

Last-mile delivery logistics tends to be the most expensive and time-consuming part of the shipping process. According to one estimate, last-mile accounts for 53% of total shipping costs and 41% of total supply chain costs. With the rise of ecommerce in the U.S., retail providers are increasingly focusing on fulfilment and distribution at the lowest cost. Particularly in the construction industry, the pandemic continues to disrupt wholesalers — a 2020 Statista survey found that 73% of buyers and users of freight transportation and logistics services experienced an impact on their operations.

Founded in 2016, Optimal Dynamics offers a platform that taps AI to generate shipment plans likely to be profitable — and on time. The fruit of nearly 40 years of R&D at Princeton, the company’s product generates simulations for freight transportation, enabling logistics companies to answer questions about what equipment they should buy, how many drivers they need, daily dispatching, load acceptance, and more.

Simulating logistics

Roughly 80% of all cargo in the U.S. is transported by the 7.1 million people who drive flatbed trailers, dry vans, and other heavy lifters for the country’s 1.3 million trucking companies. The trucking industry generates $726 billion in revenue annually and is forecast to grow 75% by 2026. Even before the pandemic, last-mile delivery was fast becoming the most profitable part of the supply chain, with research firm Capgemini pegging its share of the pie at 41%.

Optimal Dynamics’ platform can perform strategic, tactical, and real-time freight planning, forecasting shipment events as far as two weeks in advance. CEO Daniel Powell — who cofounded the company with his father, Warren Princeton, a professor of operations research and financial engineering — says that the underlying technology was deployed, tested, and iterated with trucking companies, railroads, and energy companies, along with projects in health, ecommerce, finance, and materials science.

“Use of something called ‘high-dimensional AI’ allows us to take in exponentially greater detail while planning under uncertainty. We also leverage clever methods that allow us to deploy robust AI systems even when we have very little training data, a common issue in the logistics industry,” Powell told VentureBeat via email. “The results are … a dramatic increase in companies’ abilities to plan into the future.”

The global logistics market was worth $10.32 billion in 2017 and is estimated to grow to $12.68 billion USD by 2023, according to Research and Markets. Optimal Dynamics competes with Uber, which offers a logistics service called Uber Freight. San Francisco-based startup KeepTruckin recently secured $149 million to further develop its shipment marketplace. Next Trucking closed a $97 million investment. And Convoy raised $400 million at a $2.75 billion valuation to make freight trucking more efficient.

But 25-employee Optimal Dynamics investor Mike Droesch, a partner at BVP, says that demand remains strong for the company’s products. “Logistics operators need to consider a staggering number of variables, making this an ideal application for a software-as-a-service product that can help operators make more informed decisions by leveraging Optimal Dynamics industry leading technology. We were really impressed with the combination of their deep technology and the commercial impact that Optimal Dynamics is already delivering to their customers,” he said in a statement.

With the latest funding round, a series A, Optimal Dynamics has raised over $22 million to date. Beyond Bessemer, Fusion Fund, The Westly Group, TenOneTen Ventures, Embark Ventures, FitzGate Ventures, and John Larkin and John Hess also contributed .

VentureBeat

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Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/05/13/optimal-dynamics-nabs-22m-for-ai-powered-freight-logistics/

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Code-scanning platform BluBracket nabs $12M for enterprise security

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Code security startup BluBracket today announced it has raised $12 million in a series A round led by Evolution Equity Partners. The capital will be used to further develop BluBracket’s products and grow its sales team.

Detecting exploits in source code can be a pain point for enterprises, especially with the onset of containerization, infrastructure as code, and microservices. According to a recent Flexera report, the number of vulnerabilities remotely exploitable in apps reached more than 13,300 from 249 vendors in 2020. In 2019, Barracuda Networks found that 13% of security pros hadn’t patched their web apps over the past 12 months. And in a 2020 survey from Edgescan, organizations said it took them an average of just over 50 days to address critical vulnerabilities in internet-facing apps.

BluBracket, which was founded in 2019 and is headquartered in Palo Alto, California, scans codebases for secrets and blocks future commits from introducing new risks. The platform can monitor real-time risk scores across codebases, git configurations, infrastructure as code, code copies, and code access and resolve issues, detecting passwords and over 50 different types of tokens, keys, and IDs.

Code-scanning automation

Coralogix estimates that developers create 70 bugs per 1,000 lines of code and that fixing a bug takes 30 times longer than writing a line of code. In the U.S., companies spend $113 billion annually on identifying and fixing product defects.

BluBracket attempts to prevent this by proactively monitoring public repositories with the highest risk factors, generating reports for dev teams. It prioritizes commits based on their risk scores, minimizing duplicates using a tracking hash for every secret. A rules engine reduces false positives and scans for regular expressions, as well as sensitive words. And BluBracket sanitizes commit history both locally and remotely, supporting the exporting of reports via download or email.

BluBracket offers a free product in its Community Edition. Both it and the company’s paid products, Teams and Enterprise, work with GitHub, BitBucket, and Gitlab and offer CI/CD integration with Jenkins, GitHub Actions, and Azure Pipelines.

BluBracket

Above: The Community Edition of BluBracket’s software.

Image Credit: BluBracket

“Since our introduction early last year, the industry has seen through Solar Winds how big of an attack surface code is. Hackers are exploiting credentials and secrets in code, and valuable code is available in the public domain for virtually every company we engage with,” CEO Prakash Linga, who cofounded BluBracket with Ajay Arora, told VentureBeat via email.

BluBracket competes on some fronts with Sourcegraph, a “universal code search” platform that enables developer teams to manage and glean insights from their codebase. It has another rival in Amazon’s CodeGuru, an AI-powered developer tool that provides recommendations for improving code quality. There’s also cloud monitoring platform Datadog, codebase coverage tester Codecov, and feature-piloting solution LaunchDarkly, to name a few.

But BluBracket, which has about 30 employees, says demand for its code security solutions has increased “dramatically” since 2020. Its security products are being used in “dozens” of companies with “thousands” of users, according to Linga.

“DevSecOps and AppSec teams are scrambling, as we all know, to address this growing threat. By enabling their developers to keep these secrets out of code in the first place, our solutions make everyone’s life easier,” Linga continued. “We are excited to work with Evolution on this next stage of our company’s growth.”

Unusual Ventures, Point72 Ventures, SignalFire, and Firebolt Ventures also participated in BluBracket’s latest funding round. The startup had previously raised $6.5 million in a seed round led by Unusual Ventures.

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  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
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Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/05/13/code-scanning-platform-blubracket-nabs-12m-for-enterprise-security/

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Data governance and security startup Cyral raises $26M

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Data security and governance startup Cyral today announced it has raised $26 million, bringing its total to date to $41.1 million. The company plans to put the funds toward expanding its platform and global workforce.

Managing and securing data remains a challenge for enterprises. Just 29% of IT executives give their employees an “A” grade for following procedures to keep files and documents secure, according to Egnyte’s most recent survey. A separate report from KPMG found only 35% of C-suite leaders highly trust their organization’s use of data and analytics, with 92% saying they were concerned about the reputational risk of machine-assisted decisions.

Redwood City, California-based Cyral, which was founded in 2018 by Manav Mital and Srini Vadlamani, uses stateless interception technology to deliver enterprise data governance across platforms, including Amazon S3, Snowflake, Kafka, MongoDB, and Oracle. Cyral monitors activity across popular databases, pipelines, and data warehouses — whether on-premises, hosted, or software-as-service-based. And it traces data flows and requests, sending output logs, traces, and metrics to third-party infrastructure and management dashboards.

Cyral can prevent unauthorized access from users, apps, and tools and provide dynamic attribute-based access control, as well as ephemeral access with “just-enough” privileges. The platform supports both alerting and blocking of disallowed accesses and continuously monitors privileges across clouds, tracking and enforcing just-in-time and just-enough privileges for all users and apps.

Identifying roles and anomalies

Beyond this, Cyral can identify users behind shared roles and service accounts to tag all activity with the actual user identity, enabling policies to be specified against them. And it can perform baselining and anomaly detection, analyzing aggregated activity across data endpoints and generating policies for normal activity, which can be set to alert or block anomalous access.

“Cyral is built on a high-performance stateless interception technology that monitors all data endpoint activity in real time and enables unified visibility, identity federation, and granular access controls. [The platform] automates workflows and enables collaboration between DevOps and Security teams to automate assurance and prevent data leakage,” the spokesperson said.

Cyral

Existing investors, including Redpoint, Costanoa Ventures, A.Capital, and strategic investor Silicon Valley CISO Investments, participated in Cyral’s latest funding round. Since launching in Q2 2020, Cyral — which has 40 employees and occupies a market estimated to be worth $5.7 billion by 2025, according to Markets and Markets — says it has nearly doubled the size of its team and close to quadrupled its valuation.

“This is an emerging market with no entrenched solutions … We’re now working with customers across a variety of industries — finance, health care, insurance, supply chain, technology, and more. They include some of the world’s largest organizations with complex environments and some of the fastest-growing tech companies,” the spokesperson said. “With Cyral, our company was built during the pandemic. We have grown the majority of our company during this time, and it has allowed us to start our company with a remote-first business model.”

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Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/05/13/data-governance-and-security-startup-cyral-raises-26m/

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Data governance and security startup Cyral raises $26M

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Data security and governance startup Cyral today announced it has raised $26 million, bringing its total to date to $41.1 million. The company plans to put the funds toward expanding its platform and global workforce.

Managing and securing data remains a challenge for enterprises. Just 29% of IT executives give their employees an “A” grade for following procedures to keep files and documents secure, according to Egnyte’s most recent survey. A separate report from KPMG found only 35% of C-suite leaders highly trust their organization’s use of data and analytics, with 92% saying they were concerned about the reputational risk of machine-assisted decisions.

Redwood City, California-based Cyral, which was founded in 2018 by Manav Mital and Srini Vadlamani, uses stateless interception technology to deliver enterprise data governance across platforms, including Amazon S3, Snowflake, Kafka, MongoDB, and Oracle. Cyral monitors activity across popular databases, pipelines, and data warehouses — whether on-premises, hosted, or software-as-service-based. And it traces data flows and requests, sending output logs, traces, and metrics to third-party infrastructure and management dashboards.

Cyral can prevent unauthorized access from users, apps, and tools and provide dynamic attribute-based access control, as well as ephemeral access with “just-enough” privileges. The platform supports both alerting and blocking of disallowed accesses and continuously monitors privileges across clouds, tracking and enforcing just-in-time and just-enough privileges for all users and apps.

Identifying roles and anomalies

Beyond this, Cyral can identify users behind shared roles and service accounts to tag all activity with the actual user identity, enabling policies to be specified against them. And it can perform baselining and anomaly detection, analyzing aggregated activity across data endpoints and generating policies for normal activity, which can be set to alert or block anomalous access.

“Cyral is built on a high-performance stateless interception technology that monitors all data endpoint activity in real time and enables unified visibility, identity federation, and granular access controls. [The platform] automates workflows and enables collaboration between DevOps and Security teams to automate assurance and prevent data leakage,” the spokesperson said.

Cyral

Existing investors, including Redpoint, Costanoa Ventures, A.Capital, and strategic investor Silicon Valley CISO Investments, participated in Cyral’s latest funding round. Since launching in Q2 2020, Cyral — which has 40 employees and occupies a market estimated to be worth $5.7 billion by 2025, according to Markets and Markets — says it has nearly doubled the size of its team and close to quadrupled its valuation.

“This is an emerging market with no entrenched solutions … We’re now working with customers across a variety of industries — finance, health care, insurance, supply chain, technology, and more. They include some of the world’s largest organizations with complex environments and some of the fastest-growing tech companies,” the spokesperson said. “With Cyral, our company was built during the pandemic. We have grown the majority of our company during this time, and it has allowed us to start our company with a remote-first business model.”

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact. Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/05/13/data-governance-and-security-startup-cyral-raises-26m/

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