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Applications For Tesla “Pathway To START” Program Technician Now Open

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Tesla is now accepting applications for a Pathway to START program technician position. In June, Tesla and Austin Community College announced the launch of Tesla’s START manufacturing program there, which gives students hands-on learning experiences for a manufacturing career at Tesla.

On its application page, Tesla shared: “The Pathway to START Program Technician will go through an intensive 8-week EV service training program designed to provide the candidates with the fundamental mechanical and electrical skills necessary to successfully enter the START Program. During the program, students will develop hands on experience through a blended approach of virtually-held class lessons, and hands-on repair work at Tesla Service Centers.”

The responsibilities that the student will have to take on include:

  • Learning and understanding of all Tesla vehicle products
  • Participating in team-based activities and virtual lecture
  • Following safety protocols at all times
  • Learning the fundamentals of using basic hand tools
  • Completing daily & weekly curriculum objectives
  • Maintaining consistent and professional rapport with instructor and onsite service management
  • Demonstrating ability to effectively handle multiple priorities, organize workload, and meet deadlines
  • Minimum 40 hours a week dedicated to virtual & onsite training
  • Maintaining a 100% attendance percentage throughout the 8-week program.

Tesla’s requirements for the position are:

  • High School Diploma or GED
  • Must be at least 18 years of age
  • Attend and pass each of the 8-week training sessions with a score of 85% or higher
  • Valid driver’s license in the state you live or primarily work, clean driving record and insurable
  • Must be capable of reporting to training location and local service center for training throughout program
  • Must be willing to attend the START program after 8-week program is completed; relocation may be necessary in order to attend additional START Program training
  • Ability to lift up to 60 lb
  • Must follow verbal and written instructions with attention to detail
  • Be able to work in a team-based environment and achieve set goals
  • Must have a “safety first” attitude
  • Basic computer skills, including navigating web browsers and using standard applications such as Microsoft Office Suite.

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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/07/17/applications-for-tesla-pathway-to-start-program-technician-now-open/

Cleantech

Zero Emissions Zones: A Tool to Target Benefits of Vehicle Electrification to Communities that Need it Most

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Originally published by Union of Concerned Scientists, The Equation.
By David Reichmuth and Leslie Aguayo, a Climate Equity Program Manager from The Greenlining Institute

Zero-emission vehicle technologies, like battery electric and fuel cell vehicles, are critical to reducing air pollution and climate-changing emissions from transportation. State and federal policies that require and incentivize zero emission vehicles sales are important tools to ensure that this transition away from fossil fuel combustion happens as rapidly as possible. The reduction in tailpipe pollution will help address harmful and inequitable air pollution exposure from on-road vehicles. And, there are tools that could be used to target these benefits to specific communities — communities that are disproportionately burdened by air pollution. One promising tool is the use of low- or zero-emission zones to prioritize the use of cleaner vehicles.

Low- and zero-emissions zones are a policy tool available to cities to improve air quality and can reduce congestion, raise revenue, and achieve climate goals. There are more than 250 of these zones across Europe, but can they work in the United States? To help answer this question, the Union of Concerned Scientists and the Greenlining Institute have created a primer to explore potential benefits to communities, as well as factors to consider in using zones as a tool to increase racial and economic equity. The goal of this primer is not to be prescriptive, but instead as an aid to help policymakers and stakeholders understand and evaluate the utility of low- and zero-emissions zones for their communities, as well as provide important considerations towards equitable policymaking.

Congestion, low-emission, and zero-emission zones compared

A congestion zone is designed primarily to reduce vehicle travel and is often used to combat traffic and other issues caused by having many vehicles on the road. Low-emissions zones (LEZ) and zero-emissions zones (ZEZ) are designed primarily to reduce emissions, and are often used to combat air pollution and meet global warming pollution reduction goals.

Congestion zones and LEZs or ZEZs are similar to each other, but there are key differences. In California, a city has the ability to implement a congestion zone on its own, but legislation may be needed before a city can begin creating LEZs or ZEZs.

A congestion zone may limit vehicle entry by type or time of day. Often, a fee will be used to incentivize drivers to choose an alternative form of transportation within the zone or to avoid it altogether. LEZs and ZEZs usually require vehicles to meet a certain pollution standard, but they can also be designed to apply only to certain classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty trucks.

Congestion, low-emissions, and zero-emissions zones can be designed to meet an area’s particular challenges with the best practices for that community. Some of the factors to consider are included in the table above.

Consideration of local needs vital to implementation

Communities in other countries have established ZEZs to discourage the use of polluting gasoline and diesel vehicles in dense urban areas. Given the high levels of vehicular air pollution in California and the racial inequities in exposure to tailpipe pollution, communities may want to explore ZEZs as a potential remedy ZEZs are promising because, in addition to promoting long-term change, such as the transition to electric vehicles, if designed equitably, they can direct the benefits of existing clean vehicle policies to people who are overburdened by harmful air pollution.

In implementing ZEZs in hardest hit communities, there are important equity considerations that must be addressed, such as access to cleaner vehicles and chargers, ensuring market-based approaches result in real-world emissions reductions, and, most importantly, assurance that the community has the power to determine the structure and implementation of the zone.

Similarly, decisionmakers must consider many factors in pursuing an LEZ/ZEZ, and each city will need to explore the options that work locally. For too long, in implementing solutions to help the environment, decisionmakers have missed the opportunity to center economic and racial justice. ZEZs hold potential to further all three, but the policy should be considered carefully within each local context.

In fact, equitable implementation of an LEZ or ZEZ is not possible if it is done in an acontextual or ahistorical manner, particularly in California where car dependency, highways, and transit systems were born out of racialized policies. New policies must not ignore the impact of past decisions such as the construction of highways intentionally designed to segregate communities of color or punitive, racially-targeted transit enforcement. On a smaller scale, each locality’s unique context must also be factored to design an appropriate ZEZ that targets community needs, seizes opportunities for economic development and prioritizes racial equity.

For these reasons, this primer highlights the critical importance of context, and prioritized interviews and qualitative data from stakeholders in California’s communities with the highest levels of air pollution and poverty levels (AB 617 Communities). The feedback received was critical for understanding community perspectives on ZEZs, developing equity considerations, policy recommendations for decision makers, and mitigating future transportation induced environmental inequality.

While LEZs and ZEZs are not the silver bullet to equitable transportation or pollution reduction, if done with an equity-centered approach, and in combination with other community-driven strategies, the potential benefits could serve as a step in the right direction.

Featured image from LACI, from related story: USA’s 1st Zero-Emissions Delivery Zone Is In Santa Monica, California


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/07/28/zero-emissions-zones-a-tool-to-target-benefits-of-vehicle-electrification-to-communities-that-need-it-most/

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Tesla Model 3 Review After 3 Years: “I really, really, capital letters L-O-V-E, LOVE this car!”

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Arash Malek, the founder of Scentwedge, has shared a 3 year review of his Tesla Model 3. He has accumulated 80,000 miles in those 3 years, which inspired him to share a review on how he truly feels about the car.

Arash starts the video by emphasizing that he loves his car. Imagine loving your car after owning it for three years. Many I know would be ready for a new car due to issues they have with parts or just aging.

“To summarize it with one word, I guess it would be that I love, love, love, love it — love it! I freaking love the car. I really, really, capital letters L-O-V-E, LOVE this car. Let me tell you why.

“Aesthetically speaking, the Tesla Model 3 is the most minimal interior of any car, in my opinion. Everything that’s there is absolutely necessary to be there and I find it beautiful when something is clearly a subtractive design process. When you focus on removing rather than adding, that really resonates with me, and I prefer the Tesla Model 3 interior over the Tesla Model S or Model X interior — well, not the refresh, but the one before the refresh. And I just find it so naturally beautiful.”

As he spoke, he shared footage of his Model 3 driving in the lush mountain scenery that was accented by the warm glow of the sun. There’s a small lake to the left, vibrant green grass on either side of the road that curves into a horizon guarded by small mountains. This scene reflects Arash’s aesthetic, which he described as a minimalist purist.

“For that reason, I haven’t done many modifications to the car. In fact, the only other thing that I’ve done is add a little bit more wood to the interior of the car with the Scentwedge center console. But aside from that, I’ve done zero modifications to the car and I absolutely love it the way it rolled off the lot.”

He explained that he’s not a car person. Before he drove his Model 3, he had a Honda Accord and only used it to get from point A to point B. He really wasn’t a fan of the car and isn’t much into babying a car. He would wash it in an automated car wash and didn’t really focus on protecting the paint — it was just a car.

“It’s not so much that I want to baby the car and protect it. It’s more so I still see it as a tool, but I see it as the best freaking tool — the most fun tool. And the smartest tool available that happens to also be the fastest and most fun thing to drive and get around with.

“How often do you change the oil? And the answer to that is, ‘Never. I’ve never changed the oil on my car.’”

He explained how convenient charging is, especially on road trips. When Arash was in Norway, he took his Model 3 on a five-day-long road trip. He noted that range anxiety was nonexistent.

“Going from point A to point B, the idea of charging doesn’t even cross my mind because the car navigates you to the chargers that you need along your route based on charge status — and road conditions, inclines, declines, weather — and it just does all the thinking for you. So, figuring out how you’re going to charge, where you’re going to charge, is a non-issue because the car does it for you.”

Arash also explained that although many may fret over changing the brake pads in their cars, this is not an issue for a Tesla due to Tesla’s regen braking.

“The wear and tear on the brakes are significantly less than a traditional gas-powered car. So, actually replacing the brakes if you don’t race with the car, which I don’t, is not that frequent at all. I mean I think over the course of 80,000 miles I’ve only changed my brakes maybe once and I’m not even sure of that.

“After 80,000 miles of use, I still feel the same way about it as the first day that I purchased the car. And I think something about that is intrinsically magical. It’s constantly pushing the status quo of what it used to be. It’s kind of impossible to get tired of it and that’s my genuine review of the Tesla Model 3 after 80,000 miles. It just keeps getting better and it’s never been to the point where I’ve even considered upgrading the car to anything else.

Arash said that he considered getting a Model Y due to space and car camping, but he’s already on the waiting list for the Cybertruck and he thinks that will be his end vehicle.

“I tell everyone that I know: It’s the best product that I’ve ever purchased, hands down.”

You can watch Arash’s full review here.


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/07/28/tesla-model-3-review-after-3-years-i-really-really-capital-letters-l-o-v-e-love-this-car/

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Cleantech

Tesla Model 3 Review After 3 Years: “I really, really, capital letters L-O-V-E, LOVE this car!”

Published

on

Arash Malek, the founder of Scentwedge, has shared a 3 year review of his Tesla Model 3. He has accumulated 80,000 miles in those 3 years, which inspired him to share a review on how he truly feels about the car.

Arash starts the video by emphasizing that he loves his car. Imagine loving your car after owning it for three years. Many I know would be ready for a new car due to issues they have with parts or just aging.

“To summarize it with one word, I guess it would be that I love, love, love, love it — love it! I freaking love the car. I really, really, capital letters L-O-V-E, LOVE this car. Let me tell you why.

“Aesthetically speaking, the Tesla Model 3 is the most minimal interior of any car, in my opinion. Everything that’s there is absolutely necessary to be there and I find it beautiful when something is clearly a subtractive design process. When you focus on removing rather than adding, that really resonates with me, and I prefer the Tesla Model 3 interior over the Tesla Model S or Model X interior — well, not the refresh, but the one before the refresh. And I just find it so naturally beautiful.”

As he spoke, he shared footage of his Model 3 driving in the lush mountain scenery that was accented by the warm glow of the sun. There’s a small lake to the left, vibrant green grass on either side of the road that curves into a horizon guarded by small mountains. This scene reflects Arash’s aesthetic, which he described as a minimalist purist.

“For that reason, I haven’t done many modifications to the car. In fact, the only other thing that I’ve done is add a little bit more wood to the interior of the car with the Scentwedge center console. But aside from that, I’ve done zero modifications to the car and I absolutely love it the way it rolled off the lot.”

He explained that he’s not a car person. Before he drove his Model 3, he had a Honda Accord and only used it to get from point A to point B. He really wasn’t a fan of the car and isn’t much into babying a car. He would wash it in an automated car wash and didn’t really focus on protecting the paint — it was just a car.

“It’s not so much that I want to baby the car and protect it. It’s more so I still see it as a tool, but I see it as the best freaking tool — the most fun tool. And the smartest tool available that happens to also be the fastest and most fun thing to drive and get around with.

“How often do you change the oil? And the answer to that is, ‘Never. I’ve never changed the oil on my car.’”

He explained how convenient charging is, especially on road trips. When Arash was in Norway, he took his Model 3 on a five-day-long road trip. He noted that range anxiety was nonexistent.

“Going from point A to point B, the idea of charging doesn’t even cross my mind because the car navigates you to the chargers that you need along your route based on charge status — and road conditions, inclines, declines, weather — and it just does all the thinking for you. So, figuring out how you’re going to charge, where you’re going to charge, is a non-issue because the car does it for you.”

Arash also explained that although many may fret over changing the brake pads in their cars, this is not an issue for a Tesla due to Tesla’s regen braking.

“The wear and tear on the brakes are significantly less than a traditional gas-powered car. So, actually replacing the brakes if you don’t race with the car, which I don’t, is not that frequent at all. I mean I think over the course of 80,000 miles I’ve only changed my brakes maybe once and I’m not even sure of that.

“After 80,000 miles of use, I still feel the same way about it as the first day that I purchased the car. And I think something about that is intrinsically magical. It’s constantly pushing the status quo of what it used to be. It’s kind of impossible to get tired of it and that’s my genuine review of the Tesla Model 3 after 80,000 miles. It just keeps getting better and it’s never been to the point where I’ve even considered upgrading the car to anything else.

Arash said that he considered getting a Model Y due to space and car camping, but he’s already on the waiting list for the Cybertruck and he thinks that will be his end vehicle.

“I tell everyone that I know: It’s the best product that I’ve ever purchased, hands down.”

You can watch Arash’s full review here.


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.


 



 


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PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/07/28/tesla-model-3-review-after-3-years-i-really-really-capital-letters-l-o-v-e-love-this-car/

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Cleantech

Who on Earth is Twiggy Forest? 

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Andrew “Twiggy” Forest is Australia’s second richest person. His wealth has been accumulated from mining and other ventures. He is the major shareholder and former CEO of Fortesque Metals, which holds massive iron ore leases in the Pilbara of Western Australia. Inspired by other billionaires (like Bill and Melinda Gates), he has pledged to give away his wealth during his lifetime. To do so, so far, he has funded philanthropic foundations to wipe out modern slavery (The Global Freedom Network), encourage the employment of indigenous Australians, and grant scholarships for higher learning. 

But, you are asking, how does this relate to the readers of CleanTechnica? Let me tell you about what Twiggy is up to now. Twiggy Forest has established Fortesque Future Industries. Current projects include:

  • Successful combustion of ammonia to power locomotives and large marine vessels, including ore carriers.
  • Design and construction of hydrogen powered mining trucks and drilling rigs.
  • Successful production of green iron and green cement. 

The Outback’s answer to Steve Jobs plans to make Fortesque one of the world’s biggest energy companies by using green hydrogen. Australia’s vast renewable energy resources will be tapped to create green hydrogen that will power not only Forest’s huge mining ventures but also be available for export. 

Fortesque plans to build a 40 GW renewable energy hub in the Pilbara. This energy will be used to create hydrogen which will in turn be used to produce green steel. The EU and associated countries will be looking for products that are produced in a low-carbon environment. The export potential is mind boggling. 

The transition to green steel will not be easy. Twiggy anticipates that as green hydrogen becomes cost effective, the fossil fuel industry will fight back by slashing prices. In a recent Australian Broadcasting Commission lecture, he described it thus: “At the end, it will be grim – think of a knife fight in a telephone box.”

Judging by his track record so far, I think I know who will win. We have a ringside seat, pass the popcorn!


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Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/07/28/who-on-earth-is-twiggy-forest/

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