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Apple’s AI focus: Privacy by design, iPhone by default

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Over the years, Apple has indirectly responded to many of Google’s AI advances beating it to market by noting that it was committed to advancing the benefits of machine learning without compromising privacy. Indeed, at this year’s WWDC, privacy was as big a theme as it’s ever been. The company made itself a larger thorn in the side of martech with moves like beefing up IP obfuscation, blocking mail tracking pixels, and providing VPN-like relay services to paid iCloud subscribers at no additional fee.

Nevertheless, Apple flexed its AI muscles. It expanded its cross-platform language translation functionality, introduced Apple Music-based soundtracks to accompany photo playbacks, and created a slick implementation of in-photo character recognition with Live Text.

On the heels of Google showing off the ability to identify certain medical conditions based on photos of the skin, Apple introduced the ability to track the risk of falling by analyzing one’s gait. And in revisiting one of the company’s highest-profile early forays into AI in a more privacy-conscious era, Apple announced that it would be enabling far more of Siri’s commands to work offline, a benefit driven by the company’s ever-faster processors (albeit one where Apple is still following Google’s path).

Particularly with the Mac now in the Apple processor family, Apple has been aggressive about making functionality available across its portfolio of devices. A prime WWDC example of this was SharePlay, the OS-level implementation of Netflix’ Watch Party that will work across the iPhone, iPad and Mac. Indeed, some of Apple’s AI-driven goodies like Live Text will make it onto the iPad and Mac (if the latter isn’t one of the newly minted second-class citizenry running an Intel processor).

However, the iPhone remains the center of its efforts thanks to the smartphone’s unique mix of powerful processor, ample (compared to a smartwatch) battery, constant connectivity, and personal connection. Many of these come into play in Apple’s tracking of falling risk. But even in cases such as Live Text, where its other devices are up to the task, the iPhone will be the de facto device taking advantage of this feature. One example: the Apple demo where the feature captures the contents of a whiteboard.

In contrast, Apple’s focus for its larger-screen devices focused on productivity features that, while useful, are more associated with the traditional computing model. For example, iPadOS 15 highlights included more versatile and larger widgets, more visually intuitive and keyboard-controllable multitasking, a new “shelf” interface for managing open documents within apps, and a Quick Notes feature for jotting down bits of information. The last can be created on an iPad or Mac, but only viewed or edited on the iPhone. One other meaningful user interface tweak: iPads will now display stubborn iPhone apps in portrait mode even when the iPad is in landscape orientation.

As for the improvements in the next macOS, dubbed Monterey, much of the focus was on tighter integration. The most impressive of these, Universal Control, provides the slickest and most literal example among popular consumer platforms of devices working better together, with seamless shifting of keyboard, mouse control, and content across Macs displays and iPads. The Mac will now also be able to be used as an AirPlay target for video and music and Shortcuts, another iOS import, will eventually replace Automator.

Finally, Safari has gotten a tab usage makeover, although these improvements will also make their way back to the iPad and iPhone. As Apple pointed out at its WWDC presentation, the iPhone implementation of Safari’s new tab approach is both the most creative and beneficial of those on Apple devices as it helps compensate for the iPhone’s limited screen area. But while Apple can always do more to improve the iPhone experience by improving how the user controls the device it’s clear that the more meaningful improvements will increasingly come from things that the iPhone can do on its own.

Previous and related coverage

WWDC 2021: Everything new in iOS 15

The latest mobile OS release from Apple includes on-device intelligence for more engaging FaceTime calls, the capability to store your state ID in Apple Wallet and more.

Apple’s competitors weren’t mentioned in WWDC 2021 keynote, but they were all there
Apple’s software roadmap is more evolution than revolution with a privacy twist, but the company went a long way to closing gaps with the competition.

Everything Apple unveiled this week: iOS 15, FaceTime upgrades and more
At WWDC 2021, Apple’s annual developers conference, we got our first glimpse of iOS 15 and much more.

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/apples-ai-focus-privacy-by-design-iphone-by-default/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

ZDNET

Microsoft: Zero Trust security just hit the mainstream

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Zero Trust, the borderless security strategy being pushed by vendors, has fully caught on in the enterprise, according to Microsoft’s latest survey of cybersecurity defenders. 

Microsoft, IBM, Google, AWS, Cisco and others in the cybersecurity industry have been banging the ‘zero trust’ drum for the past few years. 

The case for zero trust was made clearer after this year’s software supply chain attacks on US tech firms, which came amid a mass shift to remote work that demonstrated the need to protect information inside and beyond a trusted environment in a world that spans BYOD, home networks, VPNs, cloud services and more.

As Microsoft has argued, part of zero trust is assuming the corporate network has already been breached, either by hackers targeting that network through phishing or malware, or via an employee’s compromised home device connecting to the network.

The message has gotten through to organizations. Microsoft’s survey of 1,200 security decision makers over the past year found that 96% of consider Zero Trust to be critical to their organization. 

Zero trust will also soon be compulsory for federal agencies, helping standardize the concept in the broader market. US president Joe Biden’s cybersecurity executive order in May mandated agencies move to zero-trust as-a-service architectures and enable two-factor authentication (2FA) within 180 days. 

The Commerce Department’s NIST followed up last week by calling on 18 of the US’s biggest cybersecurity vendors to demonstrate how they would implement a zero trust architecture.    

Microsoft found that 76 percent or organizations are in the process of implementing a Zero Trust architecture — up six percent from last year.

“The shift to hybrid work, accelerated by COVID-19, is also driving the move towards broader adoption of Zero Trust with 81 percent of organizations having already begun the move toward a hybrid workplace,” writes Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft corporate vice president of security, compliance and identity.

“Zero Trust will be critical to help maintain security amid the IT complexity that comes with hybrid work.”

The top reasons for adopting Zero Trust included increased security and compliance agility, speed of threat detection and remediation, and simplicity and availability of security analytics, according to Jakkal. 

It’s all about confirming everything is secure, across identity, endpoints, the network, and other resources using signals and data.

Biden this week highlighted the real-world stakes at play with recent ransomware and supply chain attacks on critical infrastructure, telling the US intelligence community that a major hack would likely be the reason the US enters “a real shooting war with a major power”. The US president yesterday signed a memorandum addressing cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, ordering CISA and NIST to create benchmarks for organizations managing critical infrastructure.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-zero-trust-security-just-hit-the-mainstream/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Microsoft: Zero Trust security just hit the mainstream

Published

on

Zero Trust, the borderless security strategy being pushed by vendors, has fully caught on in the enterprise, according to Microsoft’s latest survey of cybersecurity defenders. 

Microsoft, IBM, Google, AWS, Cisco and others in the cybersecurity industry have been banging the ‘zero trust’ drum for the past few years. 

The case for zero trust was made clearer after this year’s software supply chain attacks on US tech firms, which came amid a mass shift to remote work that demonstrated the need to protect information inside and beyond a trusted environment in a world that spans BYOD, home networks, VPNs, cloud services and more.

As Microsoft has argued, part of zero trust is assuming the corporate network has already been breached, either by hackers targeting that network through phishing or malware, or via an employee’s compromised home device connecting to the network.

The message has gotten through to organizations. Microsoft’s survey of 1,200 security decision makers over the past year found that 96% of consider Zero Trust to be critical to their organization. 

Zero trust will also soon be compulsory for federal agencies, helping standardize the concept in the broader market. US president Joe Biden’s cybersecurity executive order in May mandated agencies move to zero-trust as-a-service architectures and enable two-factor authentication (2FA) within 180 days. 

The Commerce Department’s NIST followed up last week by calling on 18 of the US’s biggest cybersecurity vendors to demonstrate how they would implement a zero trust architecture.    

Microsoft found that 76 percent or organizations are in the process of implementing a Zero Trust architecture — up six percent from last year.

“The shift to hybrid work, accelerated by COVID-19, is also driving the move towards broader adoption of Zero Trust with 81 percent of organizations having already begun the move toward a hybrid workplace,” writes Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft corporate vice president of security, compliance and identity.

“Zero Trust will be critical to help maintain security amid the IT complexity that comes with hybrid work.”

The top reasons for adopting Zero Trust included increased security and compliance agility, speed of threat detection and remediation, and simplicity and availability of security analytics, according to Jakkal. 

It’s all about confirming everything is secure, across identity, endpoints, the network, and other resources using signals and data.

Biden this week highlighted the real-world stakes at play with recent ransomware and supply chain attacks on critical infrastructure, telling the US intelligence community that a major hack would likely be the reason the US enters “a real shooting war with a major power”. The US president yesterday signed a memorandum addressing cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, ordering CISA and NIST to create benchmarks for organizations managing critical infrastructure.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-zero-trust-security-just-hit-the-mainstream/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

Continue Reading

ZDNET

Microsoft: Zero Trust security just hit the mainstream

Published

on

Zero Trust, the borderless security strategy being pushed by vendors, has fully caught on in the enterprise, according to Microsoft’s latest survey of cybersecurity defenders. 

Microsoft, IBM, Google, AWS, Cisco and others in the cybersecurity industry have been banging the ‘zero trust’ drum for the past few years. 

The case for zero trust was made clearer after this year’s software supply chain attacks on US tech firms, which came amid a mass shift to remote work that demonstrated the need to protect information inside and beyond a trusted environment in a world that spans BYOD, home networks, VPNs, cloud services and more.

As Microsoft has argued, part of zero trust is assuming the corporate network has already been breached, either by hackers targeting that network through phishing or malware, or via an employee’s compromised home device connecting to the network.

The message has gotten through to organizations. Microsoft’s survey of 1,200 security decision makers over the past year found that 96% of consider Zero Trust to be critical to their organization. 

Zero trust will also soon be compulsory for federal agencies, helping standardize the concept in the broader market. US president Joe Biden’s cybersecurity executive order in May mandated agencies move to zero-trust as-a-service architectures and enable two-factor authentication (2FA) within 180 days. 

The Commerce Department’s NIST followed up last week by calling on 18 of the US’s biggest cybersecurity vendors to demonstrate how they would implement a zero trust architecture.    

Microsoft found that 76 percent or organizations are in the process of implementing a Zero Trust architecture — up six percent from last year.

“The shift to hybrid work, accelerated by COVID-19, is also driving the move towards broader adoption of Zero Trust with 81 percent of organizations having already begun the move toward a hybrid workplace,” writes Vasu Jakkal, Microsoft corporate vice president of security, compliance and identity.

“Zero Trust will be critical to help maintain security amid the IT complexity that comes with hybrid work.”

The top reasons for adopting Zero Trust included increased security and compliance agility, speed of threat detection and remediation, and simplicity and availability of security analytics, according to Jakkal. 

It’s all about confirming everything is secure, across identity, endpoints, the network, and other resources using signals and data.

Biden this week highlighted the real-world stakes at play with recent ransomware and supply chain attacks on critical infrastructure, telling the US intelligence community that a major hack would likely be the reason the US enters “a real shooting war with a major power”. The US president yesterday signed a memorandum addressing cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, ordering CISA and NIST to create benchmarks for organizations managing critical infrastructure.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-zero-trust-security-just-hit-the-mainstream/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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ZDNET

Apple broke bad news to iPhone fans

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We’ve known this was a problem.

I expected that if there was any time when Apple top brass would mention it, it would be during the earnings call.

And that’s when it happened.

Apple, like most other tech firms, is feeling the pinch due to component shortages.

A word that came up a lot during the call was “constraints.” It was up to Apple CFO Luca Maestri to break the bad news.

“… we expect supply constraints during the September quarter to be greater than what we experienced during the June quarter. The constraints will primarily impact iPhone and iPad.”

Must read: Don’t buy these Apple products: July 2021 edition

Normally, I’d put this down to scarcity marketing — “get in there quick with your iPhone orders, because otherwise you’ll miss out and the cool kids will laugh at you” sort of thing — but these supply constraints are real and is affecting almost every company that is involved in making things.

CEO Tim Cook went on to fill in some more details about the constraints.

“The majority of constraints we’re seeing are of the variety that I think others are saying that are I would classify as industry shortage. We do have some shortages, in addition to that, that are where the demand has been so great and so beyond our own expectation that it’s difficult to get the entire set of parts within the lead times that we try to get those. So it’s a little bit of that as well.”

A little bit of this, a little bit of that.

On the whole, Apple does like to underpromise and overdeliver, especially where Wall Street is concerned, so it doesn’t surprise me that there’s this air of caution.

It makes sense.

The landscape is changing rapidly.

But I think that it’s interesting and somewhat telling that Apple was willing to make such a statement, a statement that caused stocks to fall as a result.

This statement was not made lightly.

If you’re someone who likes getting a new iPhone as soon as they’re out, you might have to work a little harder this year.

PlatoAi. Web3 Reimagined. Data Intelligence Amplified.
Click here to access.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/apple-broke-bad-news-to-iphone-fans/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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