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Aviation

American Airlines Generates Cash As Rebound Gathers Pace

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Business is continuing to improve at American Airlines. The Dallas-based airline released its latest operational update on Thursday, June 3. In its SEC filing, American Airlines says bookings and load factors continue to strengthen and close in on 2019 levels. For the first time in 14 months, American Airlines generated more cash than it spent.

american-airlines-may-2021-operational-update
American Airlines is seeing strong forward booking and passenger loads. Photo: Denver International Airport

“As of June 2, the seven-day moving average of its net bookings was approximately 90% of the level experienced in the same period of 2019,” American Airlines says in its filing.

“In addition, American Airlines’ domestic load factor for the month of May was approximately 84% and greater than 88% over the Memorial Day holiday.”

A remarkable rebound for American Airlines

The filing confirms a remarkable rebound for American Airlines. Over the northern winter, American and its United States-based competitors were relatively pessimistic about business for the first half of 2021. The rebound took American and its competitor airlines by surprise.

According to flight data website RadarBox.com, an average of 22,152 daily departures are scheduled by all commercial airlines across the United States for the week of June 4 – June 10. The compares with an average of 26,614 daily departures in the same week in 2019 and an average of 10,425 daily departures in the same week last year.

“I want to say how incredibly proud we are of the American Airlines team and everything they’ve been able to not only withstand but accomplish over the past 14 months,” Chief Financial Officer Derek Kerr said at the Wolfe Research Global Transportation and Industrials Conference in late May.

“What we see are pretty consistent, it’s been pretty consistent with our last quarterly call that as we go into the summer and beyond, we’re still seeing yields at or above 90%.”

american-airlines-may-2021-operational-update
Strong demand from leisure travelers is powering American Airlines’reboind. Photo: Charlotte Douglas International Airport

Leisure yields at American Airlines this summer should exceed 2019 levels

In its SEC filing, American Airlines confirmed they expect this strength in bookings to continue well into the northern summer and beyond if there are no further disruptions.

“Assuming a continuation of current trends, (American Airlines) expects leisure yields to approach or exceed the corresponding 2019 levels during the peak summer travel period.”

The two underperforming parts of the American Airlines business are domestic business travel and its international network.

Business travel in the first quarter of 2021 ran at 30% of 2019 levels at American Airlines. Derek Kerr says the signs are encouraging but any business travel rebound varies across industry type and organizational size. Client-facing businesses are getting back on the road. On the flip side, government agencies and bureaucracies are being slow to their unwind business travel restrictions.

American Airlines says international travel is slowly picking up from a very low baseline. Bright spots include leisure demand to Mexico, the Caribbean, and Latin America.

“Long-haul international travel is starting to show encouraging signs,’ said Mr Kerr. “Travel restrictions are being revised and lifted in certain parts of Europe as well, which we expect will continue to be the case as vaccinations are rolled out.”

american-airlines-may-2021-operational-update
Business travel and long-haul international travel show signs of recovery but continue to underperform at American Airlines. Photo: Denver International Airport

American Airlines starts to generate cash

In Thursday’s filing, American Airlines says it expects its network-wide capacity between April and June inclusive to be down 20%-25% compared to the second quarter of 2019. American Airlines expects total revenue to be down 40% this quarter compared to the same 2019 quarter.

However, on the back of a strong rebound in domestic operations, American Airlines generated cash in May – the first time that’s happened since March 2020. By the end of June, the airline expects to be sitting on liquidity exceeding $20 billion. It marks a remarkable rebound for American Airlines.

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Source: https://simpleflying.com/american-airlines-may-2021-operational-update/

Aerospace

Airbus to deliver three more H145 helicopters to SAF Group

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Aviation and aerospace firm SAF Group has ordered three additional H145 helicopters for emergency medical services (EMS) in France.

SAF will base the three more five-bladed aircraft in Grenoble, Valence, and Montpellier.

Airbus unveiled the multimission H145 light twin-engine helicopter at Heli-Expo 2019 and upgraded the aircraft by adding an advanced five-bladed rotor.

The upgrade increases the useful load of the helicopter by 150kg.

The new bearingless main rotor design will also ease maintenance operations, thereby improving the serviceability and reliability of the H145.

SAF ordered three H145s in 2018 and 2020.

Airbus delivered the first of this aircraft recently and is set to be deployed for EMS missions in Belgium.

SAF CEO Tristan Serretta said: “Introducing six new H145s in France and Belgium in just 12 months is in line with our strategy to increase the capacity of the growing number of EMS services that place their trust in us.

“This increase of our positioning is made possible by the level of performance and the versatility of this successful helicopter. SAF is determined to help demonstrate, together with the heads of emergency services, that having the right performance and at the right cost is key to saving lives.”

SAF operates 55 Airbus helicopters, including a Super Puma, H135s and H125s.

The new H145s are expected to strengthen the company’s capability to deliver EMS missions.

There are currently more than 1,470 H145 family helicopters in service worldwide, including 470 helicopters of the H145 family for the EMS mission.

Airbus Helicopters CEO Bruno Even said: “The H145 is an ideal platform for EMS with the largest cabin in its class and unbeatable payload, it is capable of undertaking the most demanding missions. We are happy that the five-bladed H145 is gaining momentum in France and playing a key role in the modernisation of the EMS fleet in the country.”

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Source: https://www.aerospace-technology.com/news/airbus-saf-group-h145-order/

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Aerospace

Airbus to deliver three more H145 helicopters to SAF Group

Published

on

Aviation and aerospace firm SAF Group has ordered three additional H145 helicopters for emergency medical services (EMS) in France.

SAF will base the three more five-bladed aircraft in Grenoble, Valence, and Montpellier.

Airbus unveiled the multimission H145 light twin-engine helicopter at Heli-Expo 2019 and upgraded the aircraft by adding an advanced five-bladed rotor.

The upgrade increases the useful load of the helicopter by 150kg.

The new bearingless main rotor design will also ease maintenance operations, thereby improving the serviceability and reliability of the H145.

SAF ordered three H145s in 2018 and 2020.

Airbus delivered the first of this aircraft recently and is set to be deployed for EMS missions in Belgium.

SAF CEO Tristan Serretta said: “Introducing six new H145s in France and Belgium in just 12 months is in line with our strategy to increase the capacity of the growing number of EMS services that place their trust in us.

“This increase of our positioning is made possible by the level of performance and the versatility of this successful helicopter. SAF is determined to help demonstrate, together with the heads of emergency services, that having the right performance and at the right cost is key to saving lives.”

SAF operates 55 Airbus helicopters, including a Super Puma, H135s and H125s.

The new H145s are expected to strengthen the company’s capability to deliver EMS missions.

There are currently more than 1,470 H145 family helicopters in service worldwide, including 470 helicopters of the H145 family for the EMS mission.

Airbus Helicopters CEO Bruno Even said: “The H145 is an ideal platform for EMS with the largest cabin in its class and unbeatable payload, it is capable of undertaking the most demanding missions. We are happy that the five-bladed H145 is gaining momentum in France and playing a key role in the modernisation of the EMS fleet in the country.”

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.aerospace-technology.com/news/airbus-saf-group-h145-order/

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Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

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The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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Aviation

What Caused The 2008 British Airways 777 Crash At Heathrow?

Published

on

The Boeing 777 is a popular widebody family, with more than 1,600 examples having been delivered to customers since the mid-1990s. In terms of its safety record, it has been involved in seven hull losses since its commercial introduction with United Airlines in June 1995. The first of these was the crash of British Airways flight BA38 in January 2008. But what caused the aircraft to come down short of the runway at London Heathrow?

British Airways Boeing 777 BA38 Getty
The aircraft came to a stop just short of runway 27L. Photo: Getty Images

The flight in question

British Airways designated the number BA38 to a scheduled flight between Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK) and its hub at London Heathrow (LHR). Data from RadarBox.com shows that this route last used this number on January 29th, 2020. However, in that instance, the service departed from the new Beijing Daxing International Airport (PKX).

On January 18th, 2008, flight BA38 crashed just short of Heathrow’s runway 27L while attempting to land in the British capital. Although the aircraft involved was damaged beyond repair and subsequently written off, there were, thankfully, no fatalities.

Stay informed: Sign up for our daily and weekly aviation news digests.

British Airways Boeing 777
G-YMMM at LHR on January 18th, 2003, exactly five years before its crash. Photo: Aero Icarus via Flickr

The flight was just over 60% full, with 136 passengers onboard out of a total capacity of 220 seats across three classes. 16 crew members brought the total number of occupants up to 152. Of these, 47 sustained injuries in the crash, of which one was serious. So what exactly were the key factors in this incident, which was the Boeing 777 family’s first hull loss?

What caused BA38 to crash?

Investigators found the root cause of the crash of flight BA38 to be the formation of ice crystals in the aircraft’s fuel. Its route from Beijing to London had taken it over Siberia, Mongolia, and Scandinavia. Here wintery conditions had seen the temperature at the flight’s cruising altitude of 34,800 to 40,000 feet range between −65 °C (−85 °F) and −74 °C (−101 °F).

BA38 Map
A map showing the path of BA38 (in red) from where it first touched down to its final resting place just short of runway 27L. Image: Markie via Wikimedia Commons

While the fuel itself remained no colder than −34 °C (−29 °F), comfortably above its freezing point, small amounts of water in the fuel did freeze due to the cold conditions. When the aircraft began descending towards Heathrow, the air temperature rose, causing the ice to soften enough for it to flow forward to the fuel-oil heat exchangers (FOHEs).

The presence of the ice in the FOHEs restricted the amount of fuel that was able to flow to the plane’s engines. This starved the powerplants of fuel, and they were unable to respond to inputs demanding increased thrust. The plane’s speed dropped as low as 108 knots (200 km/h) at an altitude of just 200 feet.

The aircraft’s first officer took manual control of the aircraft shortly after this, while the captain reduced its flaps to reduce drag. This also prevented them from striking landing lights when the aircraft came down shortly afterward. The fuel starvation and its knock-on effects ultimately saw flight BA38 crash on the grass at Heathrow, some 270 meters shy of the runway.

BA38
BA38’s crash, which was caused by ice-induced fuel starvation, temporarily closed Heathrow, prompting several diversions and cancellations. Photo: John Taggart via Flickr

The aircraft involved

The plane that was involved in the crash of flight BA38 was a Boeing 777-200ER with the registration G-YMMM. According to Planespotters.net, it was 6.7 years old at the time of the accident, having initially joined BA on May 31st, 2001.

Over the years, the airline has flown a total of 49 777-200s, of which 44 have been the ER (Extended Range) version. G-YMMM was written off due to the crash, while its remaining 43 777-200ER counterparts are still a part of BA’s fleet even today. Meanwhile, the airline retired the last of its standard 777-200s in August 2020.

What do you remember about the accident involving British Airways flight 38? Do you know of any other similar incidents where ice has caused fuel starvation? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://simpleflying.com/2008-british-airways-777-crash/

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