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AI-powered construction project platform OpenSpace nabs $55M

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OpenSpace, a platform that helps construction companies track building projects through AI-powered analytics and 360-degree photo documentation, has raised $55 million in a series C round of funding led by Alkeon Capital Management.

The raise comes amid a cross-industry digital transformation boom, spurred in large part by the pandemic. Construction has often lagged behind other sectors in terms of efficiency, but technology such as robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), and remote collaboration tools have played a sizable role in getting the $11 trillion industry back on track.

Visibility

Founded out of San Francisco in 2017, OpenSpace leans on AI to create 360-degree photos of construction sites, which are captured by builders or site managers who traverse an area with cameras strapped to their hats. All the imagery is sent to the cloud, where computer vision and machine intelligence tools arrange, stitch, and map the capture visuals to the associated project plans. It’s all about documenting activities on each site so stakeholders can check in on progress from afar or resolve conflicts that arise by checking back on a visual history of the project’s evolution.

OpenSpace: Site comparisons

Above: OpenSpace: site comparisons

OpenSpace also offers AI-powered analytics, including “progress tracking,” which uses computer vision to analyze site images and automatically figure out how much of the scheduled work has been completed. Elsewhere, “object search” enables site managers to select an object from a scene and find similar objects elsewhere on the site.

OpenSpace: Object search

Above: OpenSpace: object search

Other notable players in the space include SiteAware and Buildots, both of which have raised sizable VC investments over the past nine months, highlighting the growing demand for digital technologies in the construction space.

Prior to now, OpenSpace had raised around $34 million, including a $15.9 million series B last July. With its latest cash injection, the company is well-financed to capitalize on its rapid growth over the past year, which it said has seen its revenue triple and customer count grow by 150%. With another $55 million in the bank, OpenSpace said it will double down on its suite of analytics products and expand them into areas such as safety management and quality control.

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Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/04/28/ai-powered-construction-project-platform-openspace-nabs-55m/

Artificial Intelligence

Fintech and retail banking firms urged to get involved in Water Breakthrough Challenge

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Fintech and retail banking firms urged to get involved in Water Breakthrough Challenge

·        The £40 million Water Breakthrough Challenge aims to spark ambitious innovation and enable new approaches and ways of working to address the big challenges facing the water sector. 

·        Entries are now open until Thursday 3 June 2021 with successful partnerships winning up to £10 million to develop and implement their initiatives.   

·        The Breakthrough Challenge is run by Ofwat and Nesta Challenges, supported by Arup, and is the second in a series of competitions funded through Ofwat’s Innovation Fund.  

·        The winners of Ofwat’s first competition – the Innovation in Water Challenge – include projects that turn ammonia in wastewater into green energy and use artificial intelligence (AI) and unexploited telecoms cables to detect leaks in the water network. 

A £40 million innovation competition – the Water Breakthrough Challenge – launches today (Thursday 6 May) to spark ambitious innovation and new ways of working in the water sector – and companies in the fintech and retail banking space are being urged to get involved.   

The Water Breakthrough Challenge aims to equip the water sector to address the big challenges facing the sector, driving far-reaching and long-lasting benefits to customers, society and the environment across England and Wales now and into the future.  It encourages collaborative entries from other sectors and worldwide partners, and aims to fund initiatives which water companies would otherwise have been unable to invest in or explore. 

Entries must demonstrate how solutions help the water sector deliver for customers, society and the environment, such as by achieving net zero, protecting natural ecosystems and reducing the impact of extreme weather, or using open data to improve customer service. 

The winners of Ofwat’s first innovation competition – the £2m Innovation in Water Challenge – were revealed last month and include green initiatives such as planting and restoring seagrass meadows on the Essex and Suffolk coastlines, a scheme to turn ammonia in wastewater into green hydrogen gas, and software that can monitor the degradation of wildlife habitats.

 Other ideas focus on the prevention of leaks in the water network through the use of AI, CCTV, and unexploited optical fiber strands in telecoms networks, as well as using behavioral science to better support vulnerable customers.  

John Russell, Senior Director at Ofwat, said: “Our innovation competitions are now in full swing and we are beginning to see a wave of innovation across the sector. Within the Breakthrough Challenge we are looking forward to seeing continued collaboration outside of the sector from a wide range of industries, and even more cutting-edge projects that tackle the greatest challenges facing our sector, and society as a whole.” 

The Water Breakthrough Challenge is funded through Ofwat’s £200 million Innovation Fund, as part of the regulator’s goal to drive innovation and collaboration in the water sector, supporting it to meet the needs of customers, society and the environment in the years to come. It is being delivered by Ofwat and Nesta Challenges, supported by Arup. 

Arlene Goode, Associate from Arup added: “This is a great opportunity for water companies and project partners. We’re excited to see the transformative projects which can move the water sector towards meeting its long-term ambitions”.  

Entries must be submitted by water companies in England and Wales, but they can enter in partnership with organizations outside the water sector – including in the fintech and retail banking space.

Chris Gorst, Director of Challenges at Nesta Challenges, commented: “The winning innovations from the first Innovation in Water Challenge show that the sector is ready to address the major challenges facing the industry, and society. A new approach is needed, including new ways of working and greater collaboration, but we have already seen the sector can rise to the challenge and deliver ground-breaking initiatives that change the status quo. We are very excited to see the trailblazing projects that the water companies, and their partners, put forward for the latest competition.” 

After a first assessment period following entries received by 3 June, selected entrants will be invited to submit more details from 28 June, with the winners announced in September. Winning entries will receive between £1 million and £10 million to support their initiatives.  

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.fintechnews.org/fintech-and-retail-banking-firms-urged-to-get-involved-in-water-breakthrough-challenge/

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Fintech and retail banking firms urged to get involved in Water Breakthrough Challenge

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Fintech and retail banking firms urged to get involved in Water Breakthrough Challenge

·        The £40 million Water Breakthrough Challenge aims to spark ambitious innovation and enable new approaches and ways of working to address the big challenges facing the water sector. 

·        Entries are now open until Thursday 3 June 2021 with successful partnerships winning up to £10 million to develop and implement their initiatives.   

·        The Breakthrough Challenge is run by Ofwat and Nesta Challenges, supported by Arup, and is the second in a series of competitions funded through Ofwat’s Innovation Fund.  

·        The winners of Ofwat’s first competition – the Innovation in Water Challenge – include projects that turn ammonia in wastewater into green energy and use artificial intelligence (AI) and unexploited telecoms cables to detect leaks in the water network. 

A £40 million innovation competition – the Water Breakthrough Challenge – launches today (Thursday 6 May) to spark ambitious innovation and new ways of working in the water sector – and companies in the fintech and retail banking space are being urged to get involved.   

The Water Breakthrough Challenge aims to equip the water sector to address the big challenges facing the sector, driving far-reaching and long-lasting benefits to customers, society and the environment across England and Wales now and into the future.  It encourages collaborative entries from other sectors and worldwide partners, and aims to fund initiatives which water companies would otherwise have been unable to invest in or explore. 

Entries must demonstrate how solutions help the water sector deliver for customers, society and the environment, such as by achieving net zero, protecting natural ecosystems and reducing the impact of extreme weather, or using open data to improve customer service. 

The winners of Ofwat’s first innovation competition – the £2m Innovation in Water Challenge – were revealed last month and include green initiatives such as planting and restoring seagrass meadows on the Essex and Suffolk coastlines, a scheme to turn ammonia in wastewater into green hydrogen gas, and software that can monitor the degradation of wildlife habitats.

 Other ideas focus on the prevention of leaks in the water network through the use of AI, CCTV, and unexploited optical fiber strands in telecoms networks, as well as using behavioral science to better support vulnerable customers.  

John Russell, Senior Director at Ofwat, said: “Our innovation competitions are now in full swing and we are beginning to see a wave of innovation across the sector. Within the Breakthrough Challenge we are looking forward to seeing continued collaboration outside of the sector from a wide range of industries, and even more cutting-edge projects that tackle the greatest challenges facing our sector, and society as a whole.” 

The Water Breakthrough Challenge is funded through Ofwat’s £200 million Innovation Fund, as part of the regulator’s goal to drive innovation and collaboration in the water sector, supporting it to meet the needs of customers, society and the environment in the years to come. It is being delivered by Ofwat and Nesta Challenges, supported by Arup. 

Arlene Goode, Associate from Arup added: “This is a great opportunity for water companies and project partners. We’re excited to see the transformative projects which can move the water sector towards meeting its long-term ambitions”.  

Entries must be submitted by water companies in England and Wales, but they can enter in partnership with organizations outside the water sector – including in the fintech and retail banking space.

Chris Gorst, Director of Challenges at Nesta Challenges, commented: “The winning innovations from the first Innovation in Water Challenge show that the sector is ready to address the major challenges facing the industry, and society. A new approach is needed, including new ways of working and greater collaboration, but we have already seen the sector can rise to the challenge and deliver ground-breaking initiatives that change the status quo. We are very excited to see the trailblazing projects that the water companies, and their partners, put forward for the latest competition.” 

After a first assessment period following entries received by 3 June, selected entrants will be invited to submit more details from 28 June, with the winners announced in September. Winning entries will receive between £1 million and £10 million to support their initiatives.  

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.fintechnews.org/fintech-and-retail-banking-firms-urged-to-get-involved-in-water-breakthrough-challenge/

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The four biggest challenges facing the payments industry right now

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We all know that 2020 was an unusual and challenging year for everyone and as much as we would have all wished that things could have gone back to normal the second the clock struck midnight on the 31 December, that has unfortunately not been the case. Most industries and businesses continue to face a number of challenges, some carried over from last year and others new to 2021. The payments industry is no exception to this. In difficult times it is even more important to understand our key challenges, so we are able to manage and overcome them.

To support that end, from my own experiences through 2020 and in 2021 so far, I have outlined the four biggest challenges I see for the payments industry and my thoughts on how to approach them.

Uncertainty

The biggest challenge facing payment providers this year is the continuing and over-riding state of uncertainty in the short term, but also for the medium to longer term. This isn’t limited to fintech and payments either, the past 12 months have been difficult for businesses in most sectors. This especially causes a problem for businesses as to how they manage the immediate and short-term challenges they are facing, while at the same time retaining focus on their medium- and longer-term planning and strategy.

Making decisions that protect the business in the short term and to adapt to the current situation can often be at odds with longer term goals. Increased uncertainty around for example, changes in customer behaviour and preferences, rules and regulations, and the economic outlook, adds a further layer of complexity for payments businesses in making strategic decisions.

Moreover, it would seem the current state of uncertainty may persist for some time. This combined with us being to a greater extent in ‘unchartered waters’ makes it even harder to forecast the future. With the struggles that COVID-19 has brought upon us, customer shopping behaviour has been forced to change and organisations have had to work hard to keep up with changing demands and requirements.

This has led to many businesses having to completely rethink their plans for the year and change much of their existing business model, which in turn has a knock-on effect to their business partners such as payment providers. Uncertainty as to whether the shift in customer preferences reflects a permanent change, or whether they will revert back to ‘normal’, once the pandemic is over, adds further difficulty in maintaining a balance between pursuing short-term initiatives and long-term initiatives – and deciding which of those to pursue. The past is not a reliable indicator of the future is probably now an even truer statement than ever. 

Uncertainty does however bring opportunity, and it is often challenges and uncertainty which drive forward leaps in innovation too. Businesses need to remain proactive in these times by staying up to date with industry developments, emerging customer trends and having a close eye on any new opportunities that may arise.

A business that manages to remain focused on its medium- and longer-term goals as well as its short-term challenges and which can remain nimble and flexible in its responses to the current uncertainty, has the best chances to be able to spot and take advantage of opportunities quickly. To do this, businesses need to keep their operations constantly under review and make changes decisively to adapt to the current climate as they push forward with their plans and development.

Regulation

Regulations are also likely to see a further overhaul in 2021. Following on from the ongoing legacy of the Wirecard scandal, regulators worldwide will certainly want to avoid any similar high profile and catastrophic collapses happening within the payments industry again. As a result, regulators are likely to introduce tougher and stricter regulations to keep customer funds safe and to protect the wider financial system.

Most of us would recognise that regulations are a good and necessary thing for the industry but changes in regulation can often present a challenge from a business perspective. This challenge can present itself through assessing the new requirements, through to deploying them and the potential additional time and resources required to ensuring ongoing compliance is achieved and maintained.

Key to successfully ensuring compliance with current regulatory requirements and making changes to meet changes in regulation, is to ensure the requirements are fully understood by the business. Where there is any doubt, it is always worthwhile seeking external advice which can help the business make the required changes and ensure compliance more quickly and can often be more cost effective in the long run.

It is also worthwhile receiving the regular update bulletins from regulators, which can help the business anticipate when new regulations will be announced and can help in understanding the updated requirements and what is required for the business to remain compliant.

Overall, there is a need for business to maintain investment in its compliance function to ensure this is fit-for-purpose and is effective in ensuring ongoing compliance with all current and emerging regulatory requirements. 

Fraud

Fraud remains a key challenge facing the payment industry, as well as an issue which can have a significant impact on both businesses more broadly and end consumers. Financial crime has seen an increasing trend in recent years and is one that is constantly evolving as criminals continue to get more sophisticated and more inventive with their approaches. In parallel new fraud prevention and detection methods and techniques have been developed and deployed. But this is a constantly changing game, with criminals adopting new strategies and the payment industry and other financial institutions deploying increasingly sophisticated techniques to stop them.

COVID-19 has created some degree of additional risk of fraud, thanks to an increase in online shopping including shoppers who have never previously shopped online in the past and are perhaps less familiar will some of the more obvious signs to be wary of. Criminals are all too aware of this and are happy to use this situation to their advantage.

Unfortunately, there is currently no way to full eradicate the risk of fraud. Payment providers continue to develop more sophisticated fraud prevention and detection tools to reduce the incidence. AI and other automated tools offer increasing levels of fraud detection – but at the same time criminals are also using new and more sophisticated techniques to try to avoid detection.

The best way to win in the battle against cybercrime and fraud is to ensure that all businesses have robust and effective controls in place, whether these are around access to data, protection of physical assets such as laptops, or measures to prevent unauthorised access to the business’s IT network and system. This is particularly important for any business that holds customer personal data or payment card information, where the business must ensure this data is fully protected to remain compliant with regulations and to avoid the risk of a costly and reputationally damaging breach.

Brexit

The fourth challenge for the payments industry, and for services industries more broadly, has been Brexit. This has been a cause of uncertainty since the outcome of the vote in 2016, not just for businesses operating in, or trading with, the UK but for the country in general. A big fear for many working in the financial services industry was a no deal Brexit along with a loss of access to the European Economic Area (EEA) “passport” for financial institutions based and regulated in the UK.

While the agreement of a trade deal is in my view a better outcome than a ‘no deal’ Brexit, it is disappointing that this did not extend to providing any real certainty for the financial services industry, other than a loss of ‘passporting rights’ and only a verbal agreement at the time the deal was announced that the EU and UK government would continue discussions in 2021 around some form of ‘Equivalence’.

The current situation therefore creates ongoing additional complexity, cost and operational effort for many financial services firms – in addition to the huge industry cost and effort of preparing for the risk of a loss of passporting rights over the past 4 years. While the UK has extended ongoing rights to EU-based firms to operate in the UK, these rights have not so far been extended by the EU to UK-based firms.

Financial services companies along with industry bodies continue to lobby for UK firms who are FCA regulated to be able to operate EEA markets, as they did previously. Currently though, it is unclear if, or when, the EU might extend these additional rights to UK-based firms. In the meantime, UK-regulated businesses have had to adopt alternative ways to work with their European partners and customers.

Clearly there is a hope that there would be movement going forward to allow UK-based and regulated firms to operate in the EU, and we are beginning to see steps towards this with the technology visa that was mentioned in the UK spring budget, but this will most definitely be a situation where we will need to wait and see.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.fintechnews.org/the-four-biggest-challenges-facing-the-payments-industry-right-now/

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Artificial Intelligence

The four biggest challenges facing the payments industry right now

Avatar

Published

on

We all know that 2020 was an unusual and challenging year for everyone and as much as we would have all wished that things could have gone back to normal the second the clock struck midnight on the 31 December, that has unfortunately not been the case. Most industries and businesses continue to face a number of challenges, some carried over from last year and others new to 2021. The payments industry is no exception to this. In difficult times it is even more important to understand our key challenges, so we are able to manage and overcome them.

To support that end, from my own experiences through 2020 and in 2021 so far, I have outlined the four biggest challenges I see for the payments industry and my thoughts on how to approach them.

Uncertainty

The biggest challenge facing payment providers this year is the continuing and over-riding state of uncertainty in the short term, but also for the medium to longer term. This isn’t limited to fintech and payments either, the past 12 months have been difficult for businesses in most sectors. This especially causes a problem for businesses as to how they manage the immediate and short-term challenges they are facing, while at the same time retaining focus on their medium- and longer-term planning and strategy.

Making decisions that protect the business in the short term and to adapt to the current situation can often be at odds with longer term goals. Increased uncertainty around for example, changes in customer behaviour and preferences, rules and regulations, and the economic outlook, adds a further layer of complexity for payments businesses in making strategic decisions.

Moreover, it would seem the current state of uncertainty may persist for some time. This combined with us being to a greater extent in ‘unchartered waters’ makes it even harder to forecast the future. With the struggles that COVID-19 has brought upon us, customer shopping behaviour has been forced to change and organisations have had to work hard to keep up with changing demands and requirements.

This has led to many businesses having to completely rethink their plans for the year and change much of their existing business model, which in turn has a knock-on effect to their business partners such as payment providers. Uncertainty as to whether the shift in customer preferences reflects a permanent change, or whether they will revert back to ‘normal’, once the pandemic is over, adds further difficulty in maintaining a balance between pursuing short-term initiatives and long-term initiatives – and deciding which of those to pursue. The past is not a reliable indicator of the future is probably now an even truer statement than ever. 

Uncertainty does however bring opportunity, and it is often challenges and uncertainty which drive forward leaps in innovation too. Businesses need to remain proactive in these times by staying up to date with industry developments, emerging customer trends and having a close eye on any new opportunities that may arise.

A business that manages to remain focused on its medium- and longer-term goals as well as its short-term challenges and which can remain nimble and flexible in its responses to the current uncertainty, has the best chances to be able to spot and take advantage of opportunities quickly. To do this, businesses need to keep their operations constantly under review and make changes decisively to adapt to the current climate as they push forward with their plans and development.

Regulation

Regulations are also likely to see a further overhaul in 2021. Following on from the ongoing legacy of the Wirecard scandal, regulators worldwide will certainly want to avoid any similar high profile and catastrophic collapses happening within the payments industry again. As a result, regulators are likely to introduce tougher and stricter regulations to keep customer funds safe and to protect the wider financial system.

Most of us would recognise that regulations are a good and necessary thing for the industry but changes in regulation can often present a challenge from a business perspective. This challenge can present itself through assessing the new requirements, through to deploying them and the potential additional time and resources required to ensuring ongoing compliance is achieved and maintained.

Key to successfully ensuring compliance with current regulatory requirements and making changes to meet changes in regulation, is to ensure the requirements are fully understood by the business. Where there is any doubt, it is always worthwhile seeking external advice which can help the business make the required changes and ensure compliance more quickly and can often be more cost effective in the long run.

It is also worthwhile receiving the regular update bulletins from regulators, which can help the business anticipate when new regulations will be announced and can help in understanding the updated requirements and what is required for the business to remain compliant.

Overall, there is a need for business to maintain investment in its compliance function to ensure this is fit-for-purpose and is effective in ensuring ongoing compliance with all current and emerging regulatory requirements. 

Fraud

Fraud remains a key challenge facing the payment industry, as well as an issue which can have a significant impact on both businesses more broadly and end consumers. Financial crime has seen an increasing trend in recent years and is one that is constantly evolving as criminals continue to get more sophisticated and more inventive with their approaches. In parallel new fraud prevention and detection methods and techniques have been developed and deployed. But this is a constantly changing game, with criminals adopting new strategies and the payment industry and other financial institutions deploying increasingly sophisticated techniques to stop them.

COVID-19 has created some degree of additional risk of fraud, thanks to an increase in online shopping including shoppers who have never previously shopped online in the past and are perhaps less familiar will some of the more obvious signs to be wary of. Criminals are all too aware of this and are happy to use this situation to their advantage.

Unfortunately, there is currently no way to full eradicate the risk of fraud. Payment providers continue to develop more sophisticated fraud prevention and detection tools to reduce the incidence. AI and other automated tools offer increasing levels of fraud detection – but at the same time criminals are also using new and more sophisticated techniques to try to avoid detection.

The best way to win in the battle against cybercrime and fraud is to ensure that all businesses have robust and effective controls in place, whether these are around access to data, protection of physical assets such as laptops, or measures to prevent unauthorised access to the business’s IT network and system. This is particularly important for any business that holds customer personal data or payment card information, where the business must ensure this data is fully protected to remain compliant with regulations and to avoid the risk of a costly and reputationally damaging breach.

Brexit

The fourth challenge for the payments industry, and for services industries more broadly, has been Brexit. This has been a cause of uncertainty since the outcome of the vote in 2016, not just for businesses operating in, or trading with, the UK but for the country in general. A big fear for many working in the financial services industry was a no deal Brexit along with a loss of access to the European Economic Area (EEA) “passport” for financial institutions based and regulated in the UK.

While the agreement of a trade deal is in my view a better outcome than a ‘no deal’ Brexit, it is disappointing that this did not extend to providing any real certainty for the financial services industry, other than a loss of ‘passporting rights’ and only a verbal agreement at the time the deal was announced that the EU and UK government would continue discussions in 2021 around some form of ‘Equivalence’.

The current situation therefore creates ongoing additional complexity, cost and operational effort for many financial services firms – in addition to the huge industry cost and effort of preparing for the risk of a loss of passporting rights over the past 4 years. While the UK has extended ongoing rights to EU-based firms to operate in the UK, these rights have not so far been extended by the EU to UK-based firms.

Financial services companies along with industry bodies continue to lobby for UK firms who are FCA regulated to be able to operate EEA markets, as they did previously. Currently though, it is unclear if, or when, the EU might extend these additional rights to UK-based firms. In the meantime, UK-regulated businesses have had to adopt alternative ways to work with their European partners and customers.

Clearly there is a hope that there would be movement going forward to allow UK-based and regulated firms to operate in the EU, and we are beginning to see steps towards this with the technology visa that was mentioned in the UK spring budget, but this will most definitely be a situation where we will need to wait and see.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://www.fintechnews.org/the-four-biggest-challenges-facing-the-payments-industry-right-now/

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