Connect with us

Entrepreneur

5 Steps Entrepreneurs Can Take to Adapt During Difficult Times

Avatar

Published

on

June 12, 2020 7 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Proof that pandemics can accelerate innovation can be found as far back as the Black Death in Europe during the 1300s. The Plague eventually forced the people of the Late Middle Ages to reassess their medical practices — which were previously rooted in religion — and adapt them in favor of a more scientific approach, thereby moving the world towards modern medicine. 

Of course, the medical field is ripe for innovative ideas and tools to combat the novel coronavirus. It’s why we’re already seeing tech startups leverage AI as an effective tool during the pandemic. 

One of the earliest examples of this came on Dec. 31, when BluDot, a company tracking the spread of infectious diseases using artificial intelligence, informed their clients of a collection of pneumonia-related cases in Wuhan, China, a week before the World Health Organization announced the discovery of the novel coronavirus.

Perhaps one of the best ways AI can combat COVID-19 might be in its ability to help researchers predict the evolution of the virus. This could come in the form of learning algorithms that simulate the different ways the virus can evolve, allowing researchers to add potential vaccines to the algorithm to test against each mutation. It’s an idea already posited by Ahmer Inam, Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer at Pactera Edge, and it speaks to AI’s potential to help the medical field get ahead of the virus as it continues to evolve. Then there is India’s COVID-19 Contact Tracing App, which uses a phone’s Bluetooth and GPS systems to alert any app user in the country who has come in the vicinity of a COVID-19 infected person. 

In addition to these, there is the PACT project at MIT, which performs contact tracing while preserving individual privacy. More great minds are adding possible solutions to the world. The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Human Vaccines Project announced the Human Immunomics Initiative that will use A.I. models to accelerate vaccine development. And, as always, we can look to Slovenia for innovation. There, Telekom Slovenije upgraded its existing telemedicine solution to help healthcare professionals remotely monitor COVID-19 patients continuously and round the clock.

These examples of AI solutions already being applied to the coronavirus aren’t to suggest tech and AI startups don’t have challenges they must overcome to avoid ending up in the startup cemetery. Some of those challenges are all too familiar, including the usual difficulties companies face in integrating new technology and the challenges start-ups face in predicting time-to-market or time-to-ROI. 

Further, many of these companies will face internal challenges rooted in either cultural barriers that slow adoption within enterprises, or in selling their efforts to their C-suite and getting full leadership buy-in, a necessary step for the proper allocation of resources needed to support innovation and new technological endeavors.

Related: 3 Tips to Find a Good AI Partner for Your Recovery

What can we learn from the entrepreneurs already adjusting to COVID-19?

There are steps AI-centered entrepreneurs can take to pivot now and come out on the other end of this pandemic stronger, more viable, and ahead of their peers. Here are five ways you can position your company to be the one your clients turn to a crisis.

1. Aim for less integration, data access and onboarding.

Overcoming deployment challenges should be a primary focus for entrepreneurs in the immediate future. Entrepreneurs will need to determine how they can rely on less access to data and require less integration but get the same or better results for their clients. The speed-bumps of internal bureaucracy can slow companies. Certainly, larger corporations face these impediments.

However, successful tech start-ups and AI entrepreneurs can streamline the onboarding process for their clients. One way to do that is to explore what data is most similar across clients and focus on streamlining that area. Once you remove the friction inherent in the integration and automation of key business processes with your clients, you’ll be able to push more quickly for the adoption of new technological practices and tools.

2. Listen for the core issues, then define the new normal.

You can outsource ideas for innovation by relying on your customers. After all, the products and services you innovate will inevitably be developed to fill a need for your clients. 

Talk to your customers to find out what problems they’re most concerned about as well as what they feel their new normal looks like. Do they feel like the economy is going to rebound? Your clients have been told they’re living in “unprecedented times” with an “uncertain future.” Those are empty phrases, and your clients are still left worrying about the health and wealth of their families, teams and businesses. By reviewing existing pipelines on a person-to-person level, you truly listen to your customers, receive their worries and better determine where AI solutions can help to address those concerns.

As your customers define the new normal, you can change your value propositions to match the priorities of the market they’re describing, ultimately allowing you to add value where opportunities present themselves.

Related: 4 Ways AI Is Making the World a Safer Place

3. Don’t be a savior — focus on one problem at a time.

Of course, your clients will not run short on potential problems worth worrying about. Still, don’t adopt a savior mentality and attempt to address all of your clients’ concerns with one or multiple AI solutions concurrently. Adding more to the equation works against streamlining integration, ultimately keeping you from employing new solutions quicker.

Instead, start by identifying a single, meaningful problem you can solve for your client. And be sure to have COVID-19 in mind to be sensitive when pitching these solutions. Then, take this same approach with each client – employing this strategy across your clientele. That’s not to say you offer a boilerplate approach to each customer, nor should you fall into the trap of promoting AI-based solutions as a way to intrigue your client or raise the price of doing business. Don’t lose sight of the goal, which is to provide solutions swiftly and present the value of your AI solutions to your customers.

4. Use your entrepreneurial skills to help the most vulnerable.

You can help save the world during a time like this. According to the World Economic Forum, social entrepreneurs have helped nearly 622 million people over the past 20-plus years, improving lives by providing innovative solutions to ever-present issues such as providing improved access to health, sanitation, education and energy. What are the issues you see facing our most vulnerable? Of these issues, which ones will not be solved through governmental response? Focus on those, and you will make a true difference in lives. 

5. Lastly, but mostly, be proactive and resilient.

The AI solutions you’ve already seen implemented in response to COVID-19 illustrate why entrepreneurs are well-positioned to be the most resilient players during the pandemic. Still, those who thrive post-pandemic will embrace a proactive and resilient — as opposed to reactive — approach. Entrepreneurs, large enterprises and the world at large can’t afford to use current insecurities about an unknown future as an excuse to be reactive.

So, dwell less on the immediate inhibitors to production like disrupted supply chains and cash flow, and instead, find opportunities for your next competitive advantage without losing sight of potential long-term wins. And remember that a proactive, entrepreneurial mindset means looking for new ways to operate and innovate in these “challenging times.” 

Those who can innovate are more likely to find success.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/entrepreneur/latest/~3/mdwzTQCfxoQ/350599

Big Data

FanGraphs’ advanced baseball analytics has a new cloud home: MariaDB

Avatar

Published

on

Join Transform 2021 for the most important themes in enterprise AI & Data. Learn more.


With the 2021 Major League Baseball season opening today, fans will be filling out their scorecards as they return to stadiums for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic took hold last spring.

Of course, the data that is now regularly made available by the MLB goes well beyond the hits, runs, and errors fans typically record in a scorecard they purchase at a game. MLB has made the Statcast tool available since 2015. It analyzes player movements and athletic abilities. The Hawk-Eye service uses cameras installed at ballparks to provide access to instant video replays.

Fans now regularly consult a raft of online sites that uses this data to analyze almost every aspect of baseball: top pitching prospects, players who hit the most consistently in a particular ballpark during a specific time of day, and so on.

One of those sites is FanGraphs, which has transitioned the SQL relational database platform it relies on to process and analyze structured data to a curated instance of the open source MariaDB database that has been deployed on the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) as part of a MariaDB Sky cloud service.

MariaDB provides IT organizations with an alternative to the open source MySQL database Oracle gained control over when it acquired Sun Microsystems in 2009. MariaDB is a fork of the MySQL database that is now managed under the auspices of a MariaDB Foundation that counts Microsoft, Alibaba, Tencent, ServiceNow, and IBM among its sponsors, alongside MariaDB itself.

FanGraphs uses the data it collects to enable its editorial teams to deliver articles and podcasts that project, for example, playoff odds for a team based on the results of the SQL queries the company crafts. These insights might be of particular interest to a baseball fan participating in a fantasy league, someone who wants to place a more informed wager on a game at a venue where gambling is, hopefully, legalized, or those making baseball video games.

The decision to move from MySQL to MariaDB running on GCP was made after a few false starts involving attempts to lift and shift the company’s MySQL database instance into the cloud, FanGraphs CEO David Appelman said.

One of the things that attracted FanGraphs to MariaDB is the level of performance that it could attain using a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) platform based on MariaDB and that it provides access to a columnstore storage engine that might one day be employed to drive additional analytics, Appelman said.

In addition, MariaDB now manages the underlying database FanGraphs uses. Appleman said he previously handled most of the IT functions for FanGraphs, including the crafting of SQL queries. Now he will have more time to create SQL queries and monitor the impact they have on the performance of the overall database, Appelman said. “I like to see where the bottlenecks created by a SQL query are,” he added.

FanGraphs plans to eventually take advantage of the data warehouse service provided by MariaDB, Appelman noted.

It’s not likely any of the analytics capabilities provided by FanGraphs and similar sites will one day be able to predict which baseball team will win on any given day. However, the insights they surface do serve to make the current generation of baseball fans a lot more informed about the nuances of the game than Abner Doubleday probably could have imagined.

GamesBeat

GamesBeat’s creed when covering the game industry is “where passion meets business.” What does this mean? We want to tell you how the news matters to you — not just as a decision-maker at a game studio, but also as a fan of games. Whether you read our articles, listen to our podcasts, or watch our videos, GamesBeat will help you learn about the industry and enjoy engaging with it. How will you do that? Membership includes access to:

  • Newsletters, such as DeanBeat
  • The wonderful, educational, and fun speakers at our events
  • Networking opportunities
  • Special members-only interviews, chats, and “open office” events with GamesBeat staff
  • Chatting with community members, GamesBeat staff, and other guests in our Discord
  • And maybe even a fun prize or two
  • Introductions to like-minded parties

Become a member

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/04/01/fangraphs-advanced-baseball-analytics-has-a-new-cloud-home-mariadb/

Continue Reading

AI

Curri nabs $6M for AI-powered last-mile construction logistics

Avatar

Published

on

Join Transform 2021 for the most important themes in enterprise AI & Data. Learn more.


Curri, a Y Combinator-backed logistics startup delivering construction supplies and materials, today announced the closing of a $6 million funding round. The company says the proceeds will be used to expand its services as well as its market reach.

Last-mile delivery logistics tends to be the most expensive and time-consuming part of the shipping process. According to one estimate, last-mile accounts for 53% of total shipping costs and 41% of total supply chain costs. With the rise of ecommerce in the U.S., retail providers are increasingly focusing on fulfilment and distribution at the lowest cost. Particularly in the construction industry, the pandemic continues to disrupt wholesalers, highlighting the need for flexible and reliable delivery.

Curri claims to solve this problem in construction with an “Uber-like” last-mile delivery model. The company makes available to customers a fleet of drivers with trucks, flatbeds, cars, and other vehicles who can deliver items like pipe bundles, water heaters, and lumber. Curri users arrange an order, open the Curri app, and enter pickup and dropoff locations to book the service. Curri’s drivers then pick up the supplies and ensure the order is correct before fulfilling the delivery.

Curri offers live updates via the app to let customers follow and share the status of their deliveries. It also provides proof-of-delivery signature and photos for tracking, regulatory, and compliance purposes.

Curri competes with a number of startups in a last-mile delivery market that’s anticipated to reach $66 billion by 2026, including Bond, Bringg, Onfleet, DispatchTrack, and Deliverr. But Curri claims its secret sauce is something that cofounder and CEO Matthew Lafferty calls “elastic scale.” Basically, it’s a concept where customers only pay for what they need. While traditional fleets can underutilize trucks or idle drivers as they wait for orders to come in, Curri says it delivers loads faster thanks to a deep layer of predictive machine learning.

According to Lafferty, thousands of customers use Curri to deliver shipments throughout the U.S. “Suppliers who don’t have the ability to make urgent, on-demand, or long distance deliveries are leaving sales on the table and risk losing customers and business to suppliers who do,” he said in a press release. “Fleet augmentation is the secret weapon of suppliers who care about getting material in their customer’s hands, fast.”

Los Angeles, California-based Curri’s series A funding announced today included participation from existing backer Initialized Capital in addition to new investor Rainfall Ventures. It brings four-year-old Curri’s total raised to date to nearly $7 million following a $150,000 seed round in August 2019.

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact. Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/04/01/curri-nabs-6m-for-ai-powered-last-mile-logistics-for-construction/

Continue Reading

AI

Device monitoring and management startup Memfault nabs $8.5M

Avatar

Published

on

Join Transform 2021 for the most important themes in enterprise AI & Data. Learn more.


Memfault, a startup developing software for consumer device firmware delivery, monitoring, and diagnostics, today closed an $8.5 million series A funding round. CEO François Baldassari says the capital will enable Memfault to scale its engineering team and make investments across product development and marketing.

Slow, inefficient, costly, and reactive processes continue to plague firmware engineering teams. Often, companies recruit customers as product testers — the first indication of a device issue comes through users contacting customer service or voicing dissatisfaction on social media. With 30 billion internet of things (IoT) devices predicted to be in use by 2025, hardware monitoring and debugging methods could struggle to keep pace. As a case in point, Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 estimates that 98% of all IoT device traffic is unencrypted, exposing personal and confidential data on the network.

Memfault, which was founded in 2019 by veterans of Oculus, Fitbit, and Pebble, offers a solution in a cloud-based firmware observability platform. Using the platform, customers can capture and remotely debug issues as well as continuously monitor fleets of connected devices. Memfault’s software development kit is designed to be deployed on devices to capture data and send it to the cloud for analysis. The backend identifies, classifies, and deduplicates error reports, spotlighting the issues likely to be most prevalent.

Baldassari says that he, Tyler Hoffman, and Christopher Coleman first conceived of Memfault while working on the embedded software team at smartwatch startup Pebble. Every week, thousands of customers reached out to complain about Bluetooth connectivity issues, battery life regressions, and unexpected resets. Investigating these bugs was time-consuming — teams had to either reproduce issues on their own units or ask customers to mail their watches back so that they could crack them open and wire in debug probes. To improve the process, Baldassari and his cofounders drew inspiration from web development and infrastructure to build a framework that supported the management of fleets of millions of devices, which became Memfault.

By aggregating bugs across software releases and hardware revisions, Memfault says its platform can determine which devices are impacted and what stack they’re running. Developers can inspect backtraces, variables, and registers when encountering an error, and for updates, they can split devices into cohorts to limit fleet-wide issues. Memfault also delivers real-time reports on device check-ins and notifications of unexpected connectivity inactivity. Teams can view device and fleet health data like battery life, connectivity state, and memory usage or track how many devices have installed a release — and how many have encountered problems.

“We’re building feedback mechanisms into our software which allows our users to label an error we have not caught, to merge duplicate errors together, and to split up distinct errors which have been merged by mistake,” Baldassari told VentureBeat via email. “This data is a shoo-in for machine learning, and will allow us to automatically detect errors which cannot be identified with simple heuristics.”

Memfault

IDC forecasts that global IoT revenue will reach $742 billion in 2020. But despite the industry’s long and continued growth, not all organizations think they’re ready for it — in a recent Kaspersky Lab survey, 54% said the risks associated with connectivity and integration of IoT ecosystems remained a major challenge.

That’s perhaps why Memfault has competition in Amazon’s AWS IoT Device Management and Microsoft’s Azure IoT Edge, which support a full range of containerization and isolation features. Another heavyweight rival is Google’s Cloud IoT, a set of tools that connect, process, store, and analyze edge device data. Not to be outdone, startups like Balena, Zededa, Particle, and Axonius offer full-stack IoT device management and development tools.

But Baldassari believes that Memfault’s automation features in particular give the platform a leg up from the rest of the pack. “Despite the ubiquity of connected devices, hardware teams are too often bound by a lack of visibility into device health and a reactive cycle of waiting to be notified of potential issues,” he said in a press release. “Memfault has reimagined hardware diagnostics to instead operate with the similar flexibility, speed, and innovation that has proven so successful with software development. Memfault has saved our customers millions of dollars and engineering hours, and empowered teams to approach product development with the confidence that they can ship better products, faster, with the knowledge they can fix bugs, patch, and update without ever disrupting the user experience.”

Partech led Memfault’s series A raise with participation from Uncork Capital, bringing the San Francisco, California-based company’s total raised to $11 million. In addition to bolstering its existing initiatives, Memfault says it’ll use the funding to launch a self-service of its product for “bottom-up” adoption rather than the sales-driven, top-down approach it has today.

VentureBeat

VentureBeat’s mission is to be a digital town square for technical decision-makers to gain knowledge about transformative technology and transact. Our site delivers essential information on data technologies and strategies to guide you as you lead your organizations. We invite you to become a member of our community, to access:

  • up-to-date information on the subjects of interest to you
  • our newsletters
  • gated thought-leader content and discounted access to our prized events, such as Transform 2021: Learn More
  • networking features, and more

Become a member

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://venturebeat.com/2021/04/01/device-monitoring-and-management-startup-memfault-nabs-8-5m/

Continue Reading

Entrepreneur

Sarah Kunst will outline how to get ready to fundraise at Early Stage

Avatar

Published

on

Sarah Kunst, founding partner at Cleo Capital, has worn many hats. She’s been an entrepreneur, served on plenty of boards, is a contributing author at Marie Clare, has been a senior advisor to Bumble and worked as a consultant in marketing, business development and more.

With all that experience, she knows all too well that the process of fundraising starts well before your first pitch meeting. That’s why we’re so excited to have Kunst join us at Early Stage in July to discuss how to get ready to fundraise.

This isn’t the first time Kunst has discussed the topic with us. On a recent episode of Extra Crunch Live, Kunst and one of her portfolio company founders Julia Collins described how to conduct the process of fundraising.

For example, there is a story to tell, metrics to share and an art to building momentum before you ever start filling your calendar. That all requires preparation, and Kunst will outline how to go about that at our event in July.

Early Stage is going down twice this year, with our first event taking place tomorrow! Here’s a look at some of the topics we’ll be covering:

Fundraising

  • Bootstrapping Best Practices (Tope Awotona and Blake Bartlett, Calendly)
  • Four Things to Think About Before Raising a Series A (Bucky Moore, Kleiner Perkins)
  • How to Get An Investor’s Attention (Marlon Nichols, MaC Venture Capital)
  • How to Nail Your Virtual Pitch Meeting (Melissa Bradley, Ureeka)
  • How Founders Can Think Like a VC (Lisa Wu, Norwest Venture Partners)
  • The All-22 View, or Never Losing Perspective (Eghosa Omoigui, EchoVC Partners)

Operations:

  • Finance for Founders (Alexa von Tobel, Inspired Capital)
  • Building and Leading a Sales Team (Ryan Azus, Zoom CRO)
  • 10 Things NOT to Do When Starting a Company (Leah Solivan, Fuel Capital)
  • Leadership Culture and Good Governance (David Easton, Generation Investment Management)

The cool thing about Early Stage is that it’s heavy on audience Q&A, ensuring that everyone gets the chance to ask their own specific questions. Oh, and ticket holders get free access to Extra Crunch.

Interested? You can buy a ticket here.

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://techcrunch.com/2021/03/31/sarah-kunst-will-outline-how-to-get-ready-to-fundraise-at-early-stage/

Continue Reading
Esports3 days ago

Free Fire World Series APK Download for Android

Esports1 day ago

C9 White Keiti Blackmail Scandal Explains Sudden Dismissal

Esports3 days ago

Dota 2: Top Mid Heroes of Patch 7.29

Esports5 days ago

Ludwig Closes Out Month-Long Streaming Marathon in First Place – Weekly Twitch Top 10s, April 5-11

Esports1 day ago

Overwatch League 2021 Day 1 Recap

Esports1 day ago

Fortnite: Epic Vaults Rocket Launchers, Cuddlefish & Explosive Bows From Competitive

Esports4 days ago

Position 5 Faceless Void is making waves in North American Dota 2 pubs after patch 7.29

Esports2 days ago

Don’t Miss Out on the Rogue Energy x Esports Talk Giveaway!

Esports5 days ago

Fortnite Leak Teases Aloy Skin From Horizon Zero Dawn

Esports5 days ago

Fortnite: Patch Notes v16.20 – Off-Road Vehicle Mods, 50-Player Creative Lobbies, Bug Fixes & More

Esports3 days ago

Capcom Reveals Ransomware Hack Came from Old VPN

Esports2 days ago

Fortnite: DreamHack Cash Cup Extra Europe & NA East Results

Esports2 days ago

Gamers Club and Riot Games Organize Women’s Valorant Circuit in Latin America

Esports5 days ago

League of Legends’ Patch 11.8 introduces Gwen, champion updates and new Skins

Blockchain5 days ago

Guide to Gambling with Ethereum Now and in the Future

Blockchain5 days ago

ETC Group notiert ersten Litecoin ETP an Deutscher Börse

Esports3 days ago

PSA: CSGO Fans Beware, Unfixed Steam Invite Hack Could Take Over Your PC.

Blockchain5 days ago

COPA verklagt Craig Wright wegen Bitcoin-Copyright

Esports5 days ago

shroud explains why bottom fragging in Valorant is no big deal

Fintech4 days ago

Software-based facial recognition in payments industry to dominate by 2025

Trending