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4 Creative Ways to Use Clubhouse For Marketing

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Peter Hacker Noon profile picture

@spekulatiusPeter

Building side-projects and learning new stuff every day.

Clubhouse was trending big time, now comes a time of consolidation and figuring out what to do with it 🤔️ That much is clear. This brings one question up: how can you use it for your benefit? What are the common ways to promote your side-project, business, or ideas? Also, how does it integrate with other social media?

Keep reading to learn four methods to drive attention to your business or project with the help of Clubhouse. If you aren’t fully on board, read up on how to use Clubhouse (if you are new and need some more).

Let’s jump straight into the first way to promote your business with expert interviews.

1. Interview Experts Who Turned Their Passion Into a Business

It’s easy to find people who want to talk to you, especially if you’re willing to give them publicity. In the past, finding experts to talk to you meant cold-calling or emailing businesses and people you didn’t know. Fortunately, social media changed all that. Today, it is far easier to find experts willing to talk to you.

The most obvious place to find experts is LinkedIn, which has more than 700 million users worldwide. There, you can reach virtually any profession — even very specialized professions.

Let’s say, for example, that you want to learn more about how to improve the performance of your company’s sales department. Start by putting “sales” in the “Industry” box at the top of the LinkedIn homepage. Then click into the “Companies” box and type in the name of your company. Now hit the Search button to bring up a list of all the companies that have salespeople.

2. Host an AMA or Q&A session

AMA stands for “ask me anything” and it is a type of “self-interview”. Traditional interviews are led by a moderator and have pre-selected questions by the interviewer. AMAs have the host actively engaging the audience and having the guests participate. Usually, the questions are sent in by listeners before the session.

In recent years, AMAs have become popular on Reddit and YouTube especially. To learn more about AMAs in general, here. Most of the lessons can be used on Clubhouse.

3. Pre-Event and Post-Event Sessions

A great way to engage with your listeners is with pre and post-events on Clubhouse. Clubhouse Events allow you to create pre-event and post-event discussions for elections, sports events, fundraising challenges, media launches, etc. As you can plan and organize an event for various cases, the limit is your imagination here.

4. Hold a panel discussion on Clubhouse

A panel is a group of experts discussing a topic. Each person in the group needs to be an expert to some degree. Ideally, you want the group to not entirely agree as there wouldn’t be much to talk about. Naturally, diverse panels lead to much more interesting discussions.

It is essential to have a moderator to start with – a moderator who can keep the discussion going and solve conflicts if they occur. The moderator’s job is to maintain a friendly environment and allow everyone to have a pleasant experience.

Bonus Tip: Get the most out of your social shares

You surely want to take your friends and fans along to your Clubhouse sessions. Yet, whenever you post a Clubhouse link, they look a bit sad:

This leaves room for improvement. ClubLink is a free tool I’ve built to help with this. It converts your sharing posts to awesome looking images:

This is especially important with dropping

organic traffic from social media

. I hope this helps you driving more attention to your Clubhouse sessions!

Over to you!

With these four ideas, you should be armed to get your sessions going. So head over to Clubhouse and get started today. A spontaneous session often helps to get your direction sorted.

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NEWATLAS

World’s first wooden satellite to launch later this year

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A first-of-a-kind spacecraft is set to make history later this year, but will do so using materials you could find at your local hardware store. The world’s first wooden satellite will enter orbit as a box made largely of birch plywood, which will be packed with sensors from the European Space Agency (ESA) to study the potential of the material in space.

The Woodsat is a CubeSat measuring around 10 cm (4 in) along each side, but what’s unique about this box-shaped miniature satellite is that the surface panels will be made from plywood. In fact, the only non-wooden parts featured on the outside are the corner aluminum railings that will help with its deployment once in space, along with a metal selfie stick.

The Woodsat is the brainchild of Finnish science journalist Jari Makinen, who also heads up a company called Arctic Astronauts that sells replica CubeSats for educational use and space hobbyists.

“I’ve always enjoyed making model planes, involving a lot of wooden parts,” says Makinen. “Having worked in the space education field, this got me wondering; why don’t we fly any wooden materials in space? So I had the idea first of all to fly a wooden satellite up to the stratosphere, aboard a weather balloon. That happened in 2017, with a wooden version of KitSat. That having gone well, we decided to upgrade it and actually go into orbit.”

Makinen has since secured commercial backing for a mission to space, and lined up a launch partner in Rocket Lab, which will supply its Electron booster for lift-off. ESA, meanwhile is working on a sensor suite that, along with the onboard cameras, will track the satellite’s performance in space.

The Woodsat features surface panels of birch plywood
The Woodsat features surface panels of birch plywood

ESA

One camera will be mounted to the selfie stick to capture images of the wooden surfaces, while also onboard will be an LED light, a sensor to monitor the pressure levels in the Woodsat’s cavities and a contamination sensor called a quartz crystal microbalance. This will track tiny deposits that take shape on the satellite coming from either the onboard electronics or the surface of the wood, which itself had to be treated in preparation for the mission.

“The main difference is that ordinary plywood is too humid for space uses, so we place our wood in a thermal vacuum chamber to dry it out,” explains Woodsat’s chief engineer Samuli Nyman. “Then we also perform atomic layer deposition, adding a very thin aluminum oxide layer – typically used to encapsulate electronics. This should minimize any unwanted vapors from the wood, known as ‘outgassing’ in the space field, while also protecting against the erosive effects of atomic oxygen. We’ll also be testing other varnishes and lacquers on some sections of the wood.”

The mission planners expect the Woodsat to survive this atomic oxygen, which forms near the fringes of the atmosphere when oxygen molecules are broken down by the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation. They do, however, expect the wood to be darkened by this ultraviolet radiation as it orbits the planet at an altitude of around 500 to 600 km (310 to 372 miles). All going to plan, Woodsat will launch before the end of the year.

“In the end, Woodsat is simply a beautiful object in terms of traditional Nordic design and simplicity, it should be very interesting to see it in orbit,” says Makinen. “Our hope is it helps inspire people to take increased interest in satellites and the space sector as something that already touches all our lives, and is only going to get bigger in future.”

Source: ESA

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Source: https://newatlas.com/space/world-first-wooden-satellite-woodsat/

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NEWATLAS

World’s first wooden satellite to launch later this year

Published

on

A first-of-a-kind spacecraft is set to make history later this year, but will do so using materials you could find at your local hardware store. The world’s first wooden satellite will enter orbit as a box made largely of birch plywood, which will be packed with sensors from the European Space Agency (ESA) to study the potential of the material in space.

The Woodsat is a CubeSat measuring around 10 cm (4 in) along each side, but what’s unique about this box-shaped miniature satellite is that the surface panels will be made from plywood. In fact, the only non-wooden parts featured on the outside are the corner aluminum railings that will help with its deployment once in space, along with a metal selfie stick.

The Woodsat is the brainchild of Finnish science journalist Jari Makinen, who also heads up a company called Arctic Astronauts that sells replica CubeSats for educational use and space hobbyists.

“I’ve always enjoyed making model planes, involving a lot of wooden parts,” says Makinen. “Having worked in the space education field, this got me wondering; why don’t we fly any wooden materials in space? So I had the idea first of all to fly a wooden satellite up to the stratosphere, aboard a weather balloon. That happened in 2017, with a wooden version of KitSat. That having gone well, we decided to upgrade it and actually go into orbit.”

Makinen has since secured commercial backing for a mission to space, and lined up a launch partner in Rocket Lab, which will supply its Electron booster for lift-off. ESA, meanwhile is working on a sensor suite that, along with the onboard cameras, will track the satellite’s performance in space.

The Woodsat features surface panels of birch plywood
The Woodsat features surface panels of birch plywood

ESA

One camera will be mounted to the selfie stick to capture images of the wooden surfaces, while also onboard will be an LED light, a sensor to monitor the pressure levels in the Woodsat’s cavities and a contamination sensor called a quartz crystal microbalance. This will track tiny deposits that take shape on the satellite coming from either the onboard electronics or the surface of the wood, which itself had to be treated in preparation for the mission.

“The main difference is that ordinary plywood is too humid for space uses, so we place our wood in a thermal vacuum chamber to dry it out,” explains Woodsat’s chief engineer Samuli Nyman. “Then we also perform atomic layer deposition, adding a very thin aluminum oxide layer – typically used to encapsulate electronics. This should minimize any unwanted vapors from the wood, known as ‘outgassing’ in the space field, while also protecting against the erosive effects of atomic oxygen. We’ll also be testing other varnishes and lacquers on some sections of the wood.”

The mission planners expect the Woodsat to survive this atomic oxygen, which forms near the fringes of the atmosphere when oxygen molecules are broken down by the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation. They do, however, expect the wood to be darkened by this ultraviolet radiation as it orbits the planet at an altitude of around 500 to 600 km (310 to 372 miles). All going to plan, Woodsat will launch before the end of the year.

“In the end, Woodsat is simply a beautiful object in terms of traditional Nordic design and simplicity, it should be very interesting to see it in orbit,” says Makinen. “Our hope is it helps inspire people to take increased interest in satellites and the space sector as something that already touches all our lives, and is only going to get bigger in future.”

Source: ESA

Coinsmart. Beste Bitcoin-Börse in Europa
Source: https://newatlas.com/space/world-first-wooden-satellite-woodsat/

Continue Reading

NEWATLAS

World’s first wooden satellite to launch later this year

Published

on

A first-of-a-kind spacecraft is set to make history later this year, but will do so using materials you could find at your local hardware store. The world’s first wooden satellite will enter orbit as a box made largely of birch plywood, which will be packed with sensors from the European Space Agency (ESA) to study the potential of the material in space.

The Woodsat is a CubeSat measuring around 10 cm (4 in) along each side, but what’s unique about this box-shaped miniature satellite is that the surface panels will be made from plywood. In fact, the only non-wooden parts featured on the outside are the corner aluminum railings that will help with its deployment once in space, along with a metal selfie stick.

The Woodsat is the brainchild of Finnish science journalist Jari Makinen, who also heads up a company called Arctic Astronauts that sells replica CubeSats for educational use and space hobbyists.

“I’ve always enjoyed making model planes, involving a lot of wooden parts,” says Makinen. “Having worked in the space education field, this got me wondering; why don’t we fly any wooden materials in space? So I had the idea first of all to fly a wooden satellite up to the stratosphere, aboard a weather balloon. That happened in 2017, with a wooden version of KitSat. That having gone well, we decided to upgrade it and actually go into orbit.”

Makinen has since secured commercial backing for a mission to space, and lined up a launch partner in Rocket Lab, which will supply its Electron booster for lift-off. ESA, meanwhile is working on a sensor suite that, along with the onboard cameras, will track the satellite’s performance in space.

The Woodsat features surface panels of birch plywood
The Woodsat features surface panels of birch plywood

ESA

One camera will be mounted to the selfie stick to capture images of the wooden surfaces, while also onboard will be an LED light, a sensor to monitor the pressure levels in the Woodsat’s cavities and a contamination sensor called a quartz crystal microbalance. This will track tiny deposits that take shape on the satellite coming from either the onboard electronics or the surface of the wood, which itself had to be treated in preparation for the mission.

“The main difference is that ordinary plywood is too humid for space uses, so we place our wood in a thermal vacuum chamber to dry it out,” explains Woodsat’s chief engineer Samuli Nyman. “Then we also perform atomic layer deposition, adding a very thin aluminum oxide layer – typically used to encapsulate electronics. This should minimize any unwanted vapors from the wood, known as ‘outgassing’ in the space field, while also protecting against the erosive effects of atomic oxygen. We’ll also be testing other varnishes and lacquers on some sections of the wood.”

The mission planners expect the Woodsat to survive this atomic oxygen, which forms near the fringes of the atmosphere when oxygen molecules are broken down by the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation. They do, however, expect the wood to be darkened by this ultraviolet radiation as it orbits the planet at an altitude of around 500 to 600 km (310 to 372 miles). All going to plan, Woodsat will launch before the end of the year.

“In the end, Woodsat is simply a beautiful object in terms of traditional Nordic design and simplicity, it should be very interesting to see it in orbit,” says Makinen. “Our hope is it helps inspire people to take increased interest in satellites and the space sector as something that already touches all our lives, and is only going to get bigger in future.”

Source: ESA

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Source: https://newatlas.com/space/world-first-wooden-satellite-woodsat/

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ZDNET

Using the Galaxy Book Pro 360 for a month: A great Swiss knife that could be sharper

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20210614-060515.jpg
Image: Cho Mu-Hyun/ZDNet

There is a certain art to making great notebooks. They have generally been outshone by smartphones in recent years, but they still have a longer history of craftsmanship, often have longer life cycles, and have separate, dedicated fan bases all their own. And after years of slow demand, notebooks are starting to see a revival thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Amid this climate, Samsung, known more for its smartphones than laptops, has launched a refresh of its notebook series, the Galaxy Book Pro and the 2-in-1 Galaxy Book Pro 360.

Having used the 15.6-inch Galaxy Book Pro 360 for a month, I feel it is by far Samsung’s best notebook. With the Pro 360, the South Korean tech giant has succeeded in imprinting its own look for laptops when it comes to design, taking cues from its latest smartphones and tablets. 

The laptop is also incredibly light and compact. The integration of its own apps, along with the AMOLED screen and S Pen support, are done well to give the notebook Samsung’s own flavour. All of this is offered at a starting price of $1,300.

That being said, the Galaxy Book Pro 360 is far from perfect. It has shortcomings, with some feeling minor while others definitely needing improvement for any future editions of the notebook series.

PORTABILITY AND DESIGN

Portability is hands down the best thing about the Pro 360. The 15.6-inch model weighs 1.4 kilograms, but it always felt lighter when it came to actual day-to-day use. The overall design of the notebook really accentuated this feeling and made the device feel more compact than it actually is. The Pro 360 always felt light, sturdy, slid in my bags smoothly, and was never once a burden to carry around. The laptop sat comfortably on almost any surface I placed it on, whether it was on a restaurant stand or a table at home crowded with other devices.

The overall aesthetic of Pro 360 is great too. A lot of its looks are carried over from the latest Galaxy S smartphones, especially for its edges. The haze finish of the Pro 360 also matches that of its latest phones and makes the notebook look premium without being gaudy. The hinge is also relatively sturdy when taking into account the device’s thinness and weight.

As a long time user of the LG Gram 16 series and having dabbled in using Lenovo and HP laptops in the past with similar or even smaller screens, in terms of portability alone, I feel Samsung has matched them or done even better.

On the flip side, I do think Samsung put portability as its utmost priority when designing the Pro 360 and, in doing so, some of the notebook’s features elsewhere have been affected.

KEYBOARD AND TOUCHPAD

The keyboard and touchpad are great and some of the best from Samsung. The touchpad under the keyboard is larger than usual and so are the adjacent spaces where your palm sits. I didn’t like this at first but, over a month, I felt less joint pains in my wrist and fingers. By comparison, I do think it is a better option than other notebooks that offer little space under the keyboard, which forces you to type with your hands held in the air for a long time.

The keyboard also comes with a fingerprint button on the far top right which also acts as an on and off button. The enter and shift keys are narrow, but the overall experience is great and the keys are large and register well. However, the keyboard does lack the typing satisfaction of an analog or a gaming keyboard due to how thin the keys are. This is likely a compromise to make the device thinner and lighter but it wouldn’t hurt to improve on this for later iterations.

HARDWARE AND BATTERY

In terms of CPU and RAM, my review unit for the Pro 360 was the most decked out version, packing an Intel Core i7-1165G7 and 16GB. Practically, there wasn’t a time when I felt the notebook was slow. The Pro 360 also turned on and off extremely fast and the booting time was one of the best I’ve seen.

Battery on the Pro 360 is also solid. A session per charge on average lasted between eight to 10 hours, even when some of the settings were put on maximum. 

For ports, Pro 360 offers one Thunderbolt 4 port, two USB-C connectors, a headphone socket, and microSD slot.

Due to the portability of the laptop, this did result in the laptop overheating at times. When this occurred, it was very noticeable as the Pro 360 would heave loudly. Fan and cooling systems on PCs usually work best when they have space to breathe, so I think the noticeable overheating wasn’t caused by the fan design but by how thin the device is.

Surprisingly, audio is the best I’ve experienced out of a Samsung device. The sound is clear, well-tuned, and has great bass, which seems like a jump from those in the company’s past smartphones.

AMOLED SCREEN

The AMOLED touch screen is gorgeous to look at and generally great to use. The colours are crisp, and the contrast ratio combined with a 16:9 screen ratio really shined when I watched movies.

That being said, the screen is generally dim, even when the brightness setting is set to maximum. This became a problem in outdoor and bright environments where there was sunlight. Even within indoor environments, I wish the screen was generally brighter, which would have been a huge plus to show off the screen’s other strengths.

The FHD resolution (1920 x 1080) resolution of the screen isn’t bad, but coupled with the 16:9 ratio and the very thick black empty space at the bottom of the screen, it did give an uneven screen experience depending on what I was doing. Occasionally, for data and graphic-intensive tasks, the screen looked almost pixelated, while normal web browsing sometimes felt a little cramped while using the Pro 360 in notebook mode due to the 16:9 ratio, though I did get used to it quickly. Even a slight change to 16:10 ratio, I feel, would have provided a greater sense of openness.

The screen can handle casual games, but the latest Triple A games, such as Resident Evil Village or Doom Eternal, are really a no-go, though I do think Samsung never intended for the Pro 360 to handle them. For future iterations of the Pro series, Samsung should definitely offer spec options for a 2K or QHD resolution screen, or even offer a Pro Ultra model for those who are willing to pay extra for the best hardware. After all, while the Pro 360 isn’t a gaming notebook per se, it is a “Pro” model, which invites expectations of providing the best of the best.

Using the AMOLED screen as a vertically held tablet offered the best experience. The problems I mentioned before, such as visibility, were not there anymore as the device was held closer to my eyes. There was also just a general satisfaction offered by the large, gorgeous screen when using it like a traditional canvas or paper.

Overall, while the AMOLED screen is great, it doesn’t match Samsung’s own high standards set by its counterparts in the smartphone and tablet space, especially in brightness. The low brightness could have been for cost reasons or battery concerns, but I think it has more to do with fear of image retention, also known as burn-in, which larger OLED screens are more susceptible to due to having more icons on screen.

S PEN EXPERIENCE

The S Pen, which is included with the laptop, really brought out the best in this 2-in-1 notebook. In terms of size and weight, it really resembles a real pen and is very convenient to use. The screen’s response time to the pen does seem just a tad slower than that of the Galaxy S21 Ultra or the more recent Note series phones however, but the overall precision of the S Pen did feel close to scribbling on real paper. The larger screen on the notebook, which can be folded all the way back, also invites more use of the S Pen when it is used as a tablet or in calendar mode.

The S Pen can also be attached to the magnet underneath the front covering over the screen. This kind of magnet is placed in every laptop so that they can be folded shut properly, so I am unsure whether it was Samsung’s intention to have the stylus be attached this way or it was just a happy accident. 

The S Pen can be attached to where the magnet is while you are using the Pro 360 for something else, which can be convenient at times. But the magnetism isn’t strong enough for you to just thoughtlessly stick the pen on the cover and carry around the notebook willy-nilly, so you will need to put the pen in a separate compartment in bags or your jacket pocket when on the move. When using the device, I did wish there was a dedicated port for the pen in the vein of the Galaxy Note smartphones so that this wouldn’t be a worry.

spen-laptop.png
Image: Cho Mu-Hyun/ZDNet

SAMSUNG APPS

It’s great that tried-and-true Samsung apps are now included in Samsung’s notebook line, especially if you already have a bunch of the company’s devices and need a Windows notebook. As a long time user of the Galaxy Note series, it was great to have apps like Samsung Notes offered on a bigger screen.

But the important question here is: Does the Pro 360, with its inclusion of Samsung apps and what the company calls the expansion of its ecosystem, succeed in offering something more than your usual PC experience to draw in others besides Samsung fans?

Samsung obviously wants its ecosystem to come together with Microsoft’s, and apps like Links to Windows and Your Phone are there for that. The Pro 360 succeeds in bringing them together, yes, but I didn’t feel that their convergence brought more to the table than what each company already offers on their own. In other words, the whole didn’t seem greater than the sum of its parts.

CONCLUSION

Overall, I’ve loved using the Pro 360. It is a great multi-tasker and, if anything, it shows that Samsung is excellent at designing great hardware for mobile devices. Notebooks have not been Samsung’s strong suit, but, with the Pro 360, the company has really stepped up its game and succeeds in integrating its expertise from smartphones to the laptop space.

The best time I had with the Pro 360 was for Zoom calls, which included a three-hour Bat Mitzvah for a friend’s daughter. The Pro 360’s strengths, like its portability, AMOLED screen, hardware, and audio really came together for video calls. If you are looking for a general-purpose notebook above the cut for entertainment, work, and for some light creative work, that is offered at a compelling price, the Pro 360 is a great option for you. But if you are looking for the ultimate experience in a notebook, the Pro 360 doesn’t really fit the bill. 

20210614-064009.jpg
Image: Cho Mu-Hyun/ZDNet  

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Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/using-the-galaxy-book-pro-360-for-a-month-a-great-swiss-knife-that-could-be-sharper/#ftag=RSSbaffb68

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